Stye: What Is It, Causes, Treatment & Prevention- VyWhy

Last updated on 2022-06-01 13:38:31

2022-02-11

A stye is a painful, small and red lump that develops from your eyelash follicle or from an oil-producing gland under your eyelid(s).

A stye, also known as a hordeolum, is a painful, small and red lump that develops from your eyelash follicle or from an oil-producing gland under your eyelid(s). This lump is tender to the touch and has pus. Yellow or white discharge might ooze out from your eyes as well.

Stye

EXTERNAL                                                            INTERNAL

Types of styes

There are two kinds of styes owing to differences in their underlying causes.

  • External stye: This is a stye that starts at the base of your eyelash, usually due to an infection in the eyelash follicle. An internal stye might look like a pimple.
  • Internal stye: This is a stye inside your eyelid, typically owing to an infection in an oil-producing gland in your eyelid.

Your eyelid would generally be red, and tender to the touch after you first get a stye. You might suffer from sore and itchy eyes as a result.

If you have blepharitis (a condition that makes your eyelids at the base of the eyelashes red and swollen), you can also develop a stye and notice red and swollen eyelids at the base of your eyelashes. Your eyelid margin might feel crusty, and you might tear more frequently than usual due to your stye.

How do you prevent a stye?

Take better care of your eyelids, by getting rid of the germs and dead skin cells that bacteria like to feed on. Use a cotton swab to delicately wipe a mixture of mild baby shampoo and warm water solution along the base of your eyelashes, while keeping your eyes closed, for about 30seconds per eye. Alternatively, purchase over the counter lid scrubs from your nearby drugstore to clean your eyelids.

Avoid putting on expired or someone else’s makeup, used towels, or touching your eyelids with dirty hands.

Look out for early warning signs of styes, such as tender spots near your eyelashes. Upon detecting such early signs, apply a warm compress and then slowly massage the area to prevent the stye from developing. If symptoms still persist despite trying warm compress, please see an ophthalmologist (eye doctor) at the earliest opportunity.

How can you seek treatment for your stye?

Warm compress and eyelid scrub

Soak a clean washcloth in warm water and keep it onto your eyelid for 10–15 minutes at a time, 3–5 times daily. This warm compress opens and drains clogged oil glands to deal with styes.

Use a cotton swab to delicately wipe a mixture of mild baby shampoo and warm water solution along the base of your eyelashes, while keeping your eyes closed, for about 30seconds per eye.

Alternatively, purchase over-the-counter lid scrubs from your nearby drugstore to clean your eyelids.

Antibiotics

Your eye doctor may prescribe an antibiotic ointment for your stye to help combat bacteria causing the infection.

Surgery

If it reduces the quality of your vision, you might need surgery to drain it. Your doctor could conduct the surgery in the office using local anesthesia.

Bear in mind that if you suffer from a recurring one, your eye doctor might need to perform a biopsy. A biopsy is a process whereby your doctor extracts a tiny piece of tissue from the infected area to study it to determine the types of bacteria causing the recurrence or if you are suffering from a more deep-rooted eye problem.

Do not squeeze

However tempting it might appear to be, squeezing a stye could spread the infection into your eyelid. Also, avoid wearing eye makeup or lenses when infected. Sign up for an eye check appointment with planoEyecheck to determine if you have a stye or other eye diseases.

References

American Academy of Ophthalmology. 2022. What Are Styes and Chalazia?. [online] Available at: [Accessed 15 January 2022].

WebMD. 2022. Styes: How Do You Prevent Them?. [online] Available at: [Accessed 15 January 2022].

WebMD. 2022. Chalazion. [online] Available at: [Accessed 15 January 2022].

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How to read your eyeglass prescription

19-10-2021 · This article will help you make sense of these numbers and letters and guide you to read your eyeglass prescription. Dioptres. Dioptres (D) is the unit used to measure the …

19-10-2021

Regular eye checks are an important part of keeping your eyes healthy and vision clear. If your vision needs to be corrected, your eye care professional (ECP) will give you a prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses and recommend the degree of the lens that you need to see clearly. Eye prescriptions contain various numbers and letters that can be confusing at first. This article will help you make sense of these numbers and letters and guide you to read your eyeglass prescription.

Dioptres

Dioptres (D) is the unit used to measure the degree or power of the corrective lens required for clear vision. The further away a number is from 0, the more correction or stronger prescription is needed to produce clear vision for distance and reading. Sphere power, cylinder power, and add power are written in decimal form in quarter dioptre increments (0.25D).

OU: an abbreviation for oculus uterque, Latin phrase for both eyes

OD: an abbreviation for oculus dexter, Latin phrase for right eye

OS: an abbreviation for oculus sinister, Latin phrase for left eye

Instead of OD and OS, some ECPs use RE (right eye) and LE (left eye).

Sphere

Sphere (SPH) indicates the amount of lens power prescribed to correct myopia (short-sightedness) or hypermetropia (long-sightedness). A minus sign (-) means that you are short-sighted and require concave lenses to correct your vision. A plus sign ( ) means you are long-sighted and require convex lenses to correct your vision.

For example,

-2.00: represents 2 dioptres of short-sightedness

-6.25: represents 6 and ¼ dioptres of short-sightedness

3.00: represents 3 dioptres of long-sightedness

Cylinder

Cylinder (CYL) indicates the amount of lens power needed to correct astigmatism. CYL always follows the SPH power on an eye prescription. The number in the cylinder column can be negative (minus) or positive (plus). When a prescription for astigmatism is written in a positive or plus format, the ECP will convert it into a minus cylinder format by using a formula.

For example:

-2.00×180: represents 2 dioptres of astigmatism at an axis of 180 degrees

5.00×90: represents 5 dioptres of astigmatism at an axis of 90 degrees

Axis

Axis is a number between 0 and 180 degrees that indicates the orientation of the astigmatism. For people with astigmatism, there will be 3 numbers in your prescription: Sph / Cyl x Axis. For example, -2.00/-1.00×180 means 2D of short-sightedness, 1D of astigmatism at an axis of 180 degrees. If you don’t have astigmatism, the cylinder and axis boxes will be empty or only one value is written on the prescription. For example, -1.00D indicates the presence of only 1 dioptre of short-sightedness with no astigmatism.

Figure 1. Vision of a person with and without astigmatism.

Near addition

Near addition (ADD) indicates the additional lens power needed to correct presbyopia. The value appearing in this section is always a plus power, even if there is no sign to indicate that. ADD is usually the same for both eyes. You may also have an Intermediate ADD, indicating the lens power needed for computer vision or tasks performed at that distance. While an ADD lens power can differ between individuals, ECPs use an age-based table as a guide when doing a refraction test, as seen below:

Age (years) Near addition at 40cm
40 to 45 Less than 1.00D
45 to 50 1.25 to 1.50D
50 to 55 2.00D to 2.25D
55 to 60 2.25D to 2.50D
60 to 65 2.50D to 2.75D
More than 65 More than 3.00D

Prism

Prism indicates the amount of prismatic power that your eyeglasses need to compensate for a difference in the alignment of your eyes. If present, along with the amount of prism, the direction of the prism is indicated by noting the position of the base.

Here are the four abbreviations used to indicate prism direction:

  • BU=base up
  • BD=base down
  • BI=base in
  • BO=base.

For example, -2.00D with prism 0.50BD means 2 dioptres of short-sightedness and 0.5 or half a dioptre of prism power at a base down orientation.

Inter-pupillary distance

Inter-pupillary distance (PD) is the distance (in millimeters) between both pupils in the eyes. Monocular PD indicates the distance from your pupil to the middle of your nose. Binocular PD indicates the distance from one pupil to the other.

Visual acuity

Visual acuity (VA) indicates how well you can see with the degree of lenses written in the prescription.

Can I use an eyeglasses prescription to buy contact lenses?

The short answer is no. A prescription for eyeglasses does not contain information for a contact lens prescription. Eyeglasses are positioned at a distance from the eyes, while contact lenses sit directly on the surface of your eyes. The distance affects the power of the lens required to produce clear vision. A contact lens prescription must specify the base curve and diameter of the contact lens.

Example of how to read your eyeglass prescription

Compiling all the components mentioned above, here is an example of what an eye prescription looks like:

SPH CYL Axis ADD Prism
OD -3.00 2.00 1BD
OS -2.00 -1.00 180 2.00 1BU

In the right eye (OD), the ECP prescribed:

  • -3.00D for the correction of short-sightedness
  • There is no cylinder power or axis, which means that there is no astigmatism, as indicated with a dash symbol.. Some ECPs may choose to leave it empty or write SPH, indicating that there is only sphere power and no cylinder

In the left eye (OS), the ECP prescribed:

  • -2.00D for the correction of short-sightedness
  • -1.00D cylinder for the correction of astigmatism
  • A cylinder power with an axis of 180 degrees

Both eyes are prescribed with:

  • Near addition or ADD of 2.00D for the correction of presbyopia
  • Prism correction of 0.5 prism dioptre in each eye. In the right eye, the prism is base down (BD) and in the left eye, the prism is base up (BU)

We hope that this article has been helpful for you to better understand how to read your eyeglass prescription. This article is only a guide and is not intended to replace the information that you may have already received from your ECP. As always, it is always best to seek advice directly from your ECP if you have any queries about your eye check visit.

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Eye Twitching - What It Could Mean And What You Should Do ...

28-04-2021 · Usually, our eyes twitch because they are tired and this can be caused by too much stress, eye strain and fatigue, dry eyes and allergies. The most common cause of eye twitching is stress and eye strain , especially when we spend a prolonged duration of time staring at our digital screens with no periods of rest in between.

28-04-2021

green eyes

Have you ever experienced eye twitching? It could mean more than a muscle spasm.

Why does my eye twitch?

eye twitching

Medically known as ‘myokymia’, some of us may have experienced eye twitching and it’s when our eyes suddenly go into a spasm for reasons beyond our comprehension. It usually goes away after a while, but it can be annoying. At worst, it can persist for days. Usually, our eyes twitch because they are tired and this can be caused by too much stress, eye strain and fatigue, dry eyes and allergies.

The most common cause of eye twitching is stress and eye strain, especially when we spend a prolonged duration of time staring at our digital screens with no periods of rest in between. As a result, though you might not feel it, your eyes are under the weight of a lot of stress which causes them to twitch. When this happens, it’s your eye’s way of telling you to take an eye break, fast! During this time, it’s important to look away from your screen, close your eyes for a minute or two, and simply breathe.

eye strain

Dry eyes are another common source of myokymia. When we stare at the screen for excessive periods of time, our blink rate actually decreases. Our eyes aren’t lubricated enough which results in dry eyes. When this happens, your eyes can sometimes twitch as a natural response to the lack of moisture therefore, it’s important for you to grab some eye drops and restore moisture in your eyes.

If you have allergies, it’s necessary for you to take note of the cause of them. Eye allergies can show very serious symptoms such as redness, swelling, and eye twitching and sometimes, all at once. Over-the-counter eyedrops do help alleviate these symptoms, but it’s important to consult an eye doctor for a proper prescription to prevent them.

When it’s time to see an eye doctor

Eye twitching doesn’t just occur in adults, it can occur in children too. For our children growing up in the digital age, their eyes will be the first to experience the consequences of excessive screen time – think myopia, digital eye strain, and yes, eye twitching!

With their young eyes being so vulnerable to these symptoms, it’s important to get their eyes checked annually. As a parent, you can book a comprehensive eye check up at your nearest optometrist for your child at planoeyecheck.com*!

As our children’s eyes are still developing, it’s important we safeguard them and prevent any eye health problems from arising. After all, as parents, we want them to grow up free of any health and vision problems.

*Only available in Singapore. Plano eyecheck is a booking platform with partnerships with W Optics, Nanyang Optical, Videre Eyecare and Optic Point. You can choose from a wide range of outlets located all across Singapore to book your child’s next eye exam at a convenient location near you at any time.

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