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Why Does Aluminum Free Deodorant Not Work And What Should ...

Here are some reasons why aluminum-free deodorants don’t work for you: Temporary Overproduction of Bacteria & Sweat When you switch from aluminum based deodorant, huge sweat and bacteria will be released within a short period of time that has been locked up for years due to the aluminum.

That happened to me…I just switched to natural deodorant and I stink! So, I was desperately looking for reasons and solutions. And I figured it out!

Turns out…among other issues. natural deodorant requires an adjustment period!

So, if you wondering why does aluminum free deodorant not work like I used to and how to make it work, this article should help you out.

Why Doesn’t Aluminum Free Deodorant Work?

aluminum free deodorant

It does work but it takes longer time. Brands put aluminum in their deodorants to see faster result by blocking the pores from where people sweat.

Natural deodorants don’t have it, so, taking a longer time is normal.

So, if no natural brands work for you, I am pretty sure you did not give them enough time.

Here are some reasons why aluminum-free deodorants don’t work for you:

  • Temporary Overproduction of Bacteria & Sweat

When you switch from aluminum based deodorant, huge sweat and bacteria will be released within a short period of time that has been locked up for years due to the aluminum.

That will produce huge body odor and your natural deodorant won’t be able to fight the door at least for a short period. Sometimes, it takes between 2 to 4 weeks depending on your body chemistry.

So, you should not get frustrated for the first few weeks at least. After that time period, your body will adjust to this new normal and you should see the results!

  • You Are Using Wrong Natural Deodorant!

The truth is not every natural deodorant is made equal and it’s very easy to choose the wrong one considering the aggressive marketing stand they put out there.

There are different types of natural deodorant with different ingredients. Some contain baking soda too and your body may not welcome that at all.

Also, even the strong smelling natural deodorant may work for you if it does not have necessary antibacterial properties.

You need to find something that contains charcoal, zinc, or magnesium instead of baking soda. So, you need to go through a trial and error method before you find the right one for you.

Lume Deodorant

Did you know your sweat alone can’t cause any body odor? Yea…that’s right!

When the bacteria interact with sweat, we smell the foul body odor.

If we can find a way to neutralize the bacteria, there won’t be BO in the first place!

The best way to fight such bacteria living our underarms is by using antibacterial soaps!

So, not using such antibacterial soap may be another reason why your natural deodorant is not working for you!

  • Your Clothes Might Be The Culprit!

We often forget that. Due to nature of the weave, your synthetic clothes might hold onto the odor.

Instead, you should wear clothes made of cotton, bamboo fibers, or linen where odor can move through easily.

Also, if you wear close-fit clothes on a hot day, your deodorant may not work at all!

  • You Are Applying It WRONG

Not just you, most of us are used to apply deodorant right before we head out for the day. But the right time of deodorant application is at night when our skin is dry.

So, if you apply it on your damp underarm even at night, it won’t work either. The moisture of your underarm won’t allow the formula of your deodorant to absorb properly.

That’s why applying it on your clean and dry underarm at night is critical. That way, your deodorant will have a better chance of fighting against wetness and odor.

How To Transition To Aluminum-free Deodorant?

natural deodorant

It may sound weird but you need to detox from aluminum and switch to natural gradually.

And there is something to learn for this slow transition.

Here is what you should do:

  • Ditch The Aluminum From Week 1

Your pores preserve the aluminum even after you ditch antiperspirant for a while.

For the first couple of days, you may not sweat or smell awful due to that. So, keep that in mind.

From week 1, you can begin applying your natural deodorant. But you should not feel any itching or see redness or rashes.

If you do, your deodorant probably contains baking soda. Read the ingredients. Switch to another natural deodorant that does not contain baking soda.

  • Continue Deodorant Detox From Week 2

Your body will release most of those accumulated aluminum at the end of week 1. Keep applying your natural deodorant on your clean and dry armpits.

Whenever you smell your BO, wipe your underarms with wet wipes and re-apply deodorant. It may sound difficult to follow but you will have to do this for few days only and it helps a lot for the smooth transition.

Your body will release most of the accumulated toxins by now and most of the aluminum should be gone as well.

Since, there is almost no aluminum, your body may sweat even more at least temporarily. You should wear breathable shirts to lessen the sweating.

Also, keep using those wet wipes to clean your underarms before you apply the deodorant in this stage. Some people will be perfectly adjusted from week 3, but it depends on body chemistry.

  • Entering The New Normal From Week 4

Your body should be fully adjusted with natural deodorant from week 4 since it has purged all the toxins from it. It happens for most of the people at least with a few exceptions.

As you keep using the deodorant, it will become more accustomed to your body and you will have significantly less BO from week 4. Also, you will notice you are sweating insignificantly as well.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Do aluminum-free deodorants really work?

Of course, they do work! It may require some adjustment time and preparation from your part but they will work like a charm.

What happens when you stop using deodorant with aluminum?

Your skin will naturally shed aluminum from your body over time when you stop using such deodorant – Dr. Joshua Zeichner (New York-based dermatologist).

Why do I still smell after using natural deodorant?

When bacteria get trapped within the moisture of your armpits, it will cause the foul odor. Your natural deodorant needs 2 to 4 weeks to properly adjust with your skin chemistry to fight the smell.

How long does it take to detox from aluminum deodorant?

Of course, our skin chemistry varies but it takes somewhere between 2 to 4 weeks to detox from aluminum deodorant.

Does aluminum free deodorant make you smell worse?

No. They smell as good as aluminum deodorant. But it takes longer time to see the result due to the absence of aluminum in natural deodorants.

So, does aluminum-free deodorant work??

Well, buy now you should understand that they work perfectly. They just need more time than aluminum enriched deodorant to adjust with your skin chemistry.

So, it’s not really the question of why doesn’t aluminum free deodorant work; it’s all about how you switch to natural deodorants.

Switch to any good brand and stick to it for a while (I would suggest 2 weeks at least) before you get frustrated.

Share your experience with natural deodorant in the comment box. I will be happy to include them in this article.

Why does aluminum free deodorant not work?

02-09-2021 · Why does aluminum free deodorant not work? “If something’s not working for you right away, it’s because it’s adjusted to the old way of doing things ,” says Guzzo. Give a new product a few weeks to start fully working, but if it’s still leaving you stinking after that, it’s probably not the right formulation for your skin chemistry.

02-09-2021

“If something’s not working for you right away, it’s because it’s adjusted to the old way of doing things,” says Guzzo. Give a new product a few weeks to start fully working, but if it’s still leaving you stinking after that, it’s probably not the right formulation for your skin chemistry.

Moreover, Does degree make an aluminum free deodorant? Degree is known for creating antiperspirants that withstand the toughest conditions, like athletic competitions and high-stress meetings. It’s no surprise that the brand’s 0% aluminum and alcohol deodorant would do the same.

Is it worth switching to natural deodorant? According to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, conventional antiperspirant deodorants are safe — so there’s no need to worry or switch to a natural deodorant on account of your overall health. … A natural deodorant will help with armpit odor, but not sweat.

In this manner, What happens when you switch to aluminum free deodorant?

You might hear a lot of people say they have to “detox” their armpits when they switch to a natural deodorant. Many of our customers do experience an adjustment period when they switch. During this period, many of them report they smell and / or sweat more than usual.

Why do you smell when switching to natural deodorant?

Why you smell while switching to natural deodorant

It’s the bacteria that grows on sweat that causes odor,” says Katie Sturino, founder of Megababe. (The brand’s aluminum-free deodorant, Rosy Pits, is one of my personal favorites.) … It’s not that your all-natural roll-on isn’t working; it’s that your body is. Hard.

Is Degree for Men aluminum free?

Degree Men Aluminum Free Deodorant Stick Mandarin & Vetiver 2.6 OZ. … DEGREE WON’T LET YOU DOWN: this aluminum free underarm deodorant doesn’t quit with 48-hour ultimate odor protection and a zesty, fresh scent.

Does Secret aluminum free work?

The Secret Aluminum Free Deodorant for Women was totally ineffective for me. There was very little odor protection and to be effective the product needed to be applied through the day.

Most armpit detoxes use a homemade mask of bentonite clay and apple cider vinegar. Some also include water to dilute the vinegar. Others use equal parts bentonite clay and coconut oil for a more soothing, hydrating mix that still has some antibacterial properties, thanks to the coconut oil.

How long should you detox your armpits before switching to natural deodorant?

Expect to Detox

If you’ve been using conventional deodorant or antiperspirant for years, it can take 2-4 weeks to detox and release all of the aluminum in your pits that’s been preventing you from sweating. During this time, you might notice that you’re a little more stinky than usual.

Is there a natural deodorant that actually works?

Best overall natural deodorant

While some natural deodorants can have a gritty feel, Ursa Major has a smooth, gel-like consistency that glides on the skin like a conventional deodorant. Its easy-to-use stick, sweat-absorbing ingredients, and clean, unisex scent makes it a favorite of three of our experts.

How do you detox your armpits?

Mix 1 tbsp clay powder and 1 teaspoon ACV in a glass bowl (add some water if you need to thin it), then spread a thin layer over each armpit and chill like that. If you feel any pain, rinse it off immediately, but most likely you’ll just feel a slight tingling or warming as blood flow to the area increases.

How long does it take your body to detox from aluminum deodorant?

Expect to Detox

If you’ve been using conventional deodorant or antiperspirant for years, it can take 2-4 weeks to detox and release all of the aluminum in your pits that’s been preventing you from sweating. During this time, you might notice that you’re a little more stinky than usual.

Why do armpits still smell after shower?

The odor can be caused by poor hygiene or not using the right products. Or there may be an underlying medical condition that needs to be treated. Using an over-the-counter (OTC) antiperspirant or deodorant (or a combination antiperspirant-deodorant) daily, after your shower, can help remedy armpit odor.

How do I permanently get rid of armpit odor?

Baking Soda

Also, it has anti-bacterial properties that can remove the foul smell creating bacteria from your armpits. All you need to do is to mix 1 tablespoon of baking soda and 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. Apply the mixture on your underarms and wait for around 3 minutes. Then, take a shower.

Is Aluminium zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex Gly safe?

Antiperspirants: Should You Worry? In short: No. There is no real scientific evidence that aluminum or any of the other ingredients in these products pose any threat to human health. “These products can be used with high confidence of their safety.

Does degree for men contain aluminum?

DEGREE FOR MEN CLEAN ANTIPERSPIRANT AND DEODORANT- aluminum zirconium tetrachlorohydrex gly stick.

Which Degree deodorant is best?

Our top choice of antiperspirant deodorant, as well as our selection for best deodorant for women overall, is Degree – MotionSense. This product combines a strong, sweat-stopping antiperspirant with a pleasantly scented deodorant, providing both excellent moisture and odor control throughout the day.

Which Secret deodorant is best?

Secret Clinical Strength is our best protection that goes on dry and absorbs odor while releasing a scent to keep you smelling. Plus, it gives you 4X* better stress sweat protection verses the protection required of an ordinary antiperspirant. It’s also a great alternative to a prescription antiperspirant.

Can a man use Secret deodorant?

Then there is Secret deodorant. The product, marketed to women, is widely bought and used by men, says Sarchar. It boasts a slightly floral scent similar to many soaps.

What does aluminum do to the body?

Previous studies have linked frequent exposure to high levels of aluminum to neurotoxicity (adverse health effects on the central or peripheral nervous system or both), Alzheimer’s disease, and breast cancer.

Why do my armpits stink even after I shower?

The odor can be caused by poor hygiene or not using the right products. Or there may be an underlying medical condition that needs to be treated. Using an over-the-counter (OTC) antiperspirant or deodorant (or a combination antiperspirant-deodorant) daily, after your shower, can help remedy armpit odor.

Why does my BO smell so bad?

During puberty, sweat glands and hormones become more active, which can cause BO. If you’ve been working out, excessive sweat may be the culprit. If you don’t wear antiperspirant or practice healthy hygiene habits, sweat can mix with bacteria, causing an unpleasant smell.

Why do I stink with natural deodorant?

Why you smell while switching to natural deodorant

It’s the bacteria that grows on sweat that causes odor,” says Katie Sturino, founder of Megababe. (The brand’s aluminum-free deodorant, Rosy Pits, is one of my personal favorites.)

Why You Should Use Aluminum-Free Deodorant

22-05-2015 · Deodorants contain aluminum and synthetic fragrances, undesirable components many people are sensitive to. If you find that your underarms are irritated, it may be an allergic reaction to the aluminum which is toxic to the body. Aluminum has been associated with a variety of health issues, including: Breast Cancer; Alzheimer's Disease

22-05-2015
Aluminum free deodorant doesn't contain harsh chemicals that can be harmful to the body.

There are times in life when we need added protection against body odor. Whether at the gym or in an important meeting, it’s very likely that, without some type of deodorant, we’ll sweat and let out a little odor. Not a pleasant topic, but it can’t be ignored. Choosing the right deodorant is just as important as wearing it regularly. You need to find one that will not only provide lasting protection, but will also be free of toxins.

The Difference Between Antiperspirants and Deodorants

While most people use the terms antiperspirant and deodorant interchangeably, the two are not the same. Antiperspirants work by preventing perspiration from occurring. Deodorants allow perspiration but block odor. Deodorants accomplish this by killing the bacteria that cause odor. From a purely natural standpoint, it makes more sense for us to use deodorants, as it is a more natural process.

Of course none of us wants to emit an unpleasant, offensive odor, and some of us don’t particularly enjoy sweating. The fact is many personal care products that deal with these concerns contain aluminum as an active ingredient. Aluminum is also a known neurotoxin. Aluminum-free deodorants are perhaps the best alternative, and these products are growing considerably in both availability and number.

The Dangers of Using Products Containing Aluminum

Deodorants contain aluminum and synthetic fragrances, undesirable components many people are sensitive to. [1] If you find that your underarms are irritated, it may be an allergic reaction to the aluminum which is toxic to the body.

Aluminum has been associated with a variety of health issues, [2][3][4] including:

  • Breast Cancer
  • Alzheimer's Disease
  • Bone Disorders
  • Kidney Concerns

What to Look for in an Aluminum-Free Deodorant

Aluminum-free deodorants should consist of essential oils and all natural ingredients. Aluminum free alone may not be enough as some aluminum-free deodorants are still high risk, according to the Environmental Working Group, and can contain chemicals like triclosan and propylene glycol. Triclosan is perhaps a more fierce endocrine disruptor than propylene glycol, so try to avoid it. This article contains a recipe for making your own deodorant using natural ingredients like baking soda and coconut oil.

The Take Home

With new evidence and reports of adverse reactions staring us in the face, it is difficult to ignore the potential danger of so many health and beauty items on the market. What it boils down to, however, is that each of us has to take the initiative and actively seek out the products that are healthier for us.

References (4)

†Results may vary. Information and statements made are for education purposes and are not intended to replace the advice of your doctor. If you have a severe medical condition or health concern, see your physician.


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  • Why you should use an aluminum free deodorant?

    Why You Should Use Natural DeodorantAnalyzing Aluminum. Aluminum is the active ingredient antiperspirants rely on to keep our underarms fresh. ...Aluminum-Free Deodorants. The most concerning risk factor for many of these ingredients—especially aluminum—is long-term exposure.Natural Deodorant OptionsDeodorant Ingredients to Avoid. ...
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  • Why is it better to use aluminum free deodorant?

    Why is it better to use aluminum free deodorant? Deodorants do not contain aluminum, and they don’t stop you from sweating. … The aluminum compounds found in antiperspirants, Schueller says, not only reduce wetness by blocking your underarm sweat ducts, but they also minimize body odor by inhibiting the bacteria that feed on your sweat and ...

    Underarm sweat can be smelly, sticky and annoying. Antiperspirants contain aluminum salts to prevent sweat from reaching the skin’s surface, while aluminum-free deodorants help fight odor without blocking pores.

    What happens when you switch to aluminum-free deodorant?

    As your body continues to become accustomed to living without aluminum, its sweat and odor levels will self-regulate and begin to function normally. That means you’ll sweat slightly more than when you used antiperspirant, but considerably less than if you were to use nothing at all.

    Is it bad to use deodorant with aluminum?

    Antiperspirants contain aluminum to help you sweat less. Deodorants, for the most part, don’t use aluminum as an ingredient. Medical research shows that aluminum from antiperspirants can build up in your body. There’s no scientific evidence that directly links aluminum to cancers and other health conditions, though.

    Is aluminum-free deodorant better?

    The major difference between deodorant without aluminum and deodorant with aluminum is that the former blocks odor whereas the latter blocks sweat. Antiperspirants do not attack odor-causing bacteria, but instead use aluminum ingredients to alter the body’s natural perspiration process and block sweat from the start.

    Why is aluminum bad for your armpits?

    A few studies in recent years have theorized that aluminum-based antiperspirants may increase the risk for breast cancer. According to the authors of these studies, most breast cancers develop in the upper outer part of the breast — the area closest to the armpit, which is where antiperspirants are applied.

    Is it worth switching to natural deodorant?

    According to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, conventional antiperspirant deodorants are safe — so there’s no need to worry or switch to a natural deodorant on account of your overall health. A natural deodorant will help with armpit odor, but not sweat.

    Why do you smell when switching to natural deodorant?

    Why you smell while switching to natural deodorant “It’s the bacteria that grows on sweat that causes odor,” says Katie Sturino, founder of Megababe. (The brand’s aluminum-free deodorant, Rosy Pits, is one of my personal favorites.) It’s not that your all-natural roll-on isn’t working; it’s that your body is. Hard.

    What aluminum does to your body?

    Previous studies have linked frequent exposure to high levels of aluminum to neurotoxicity (adverse health effects on the central or peripheral nervous system or both), Alzheimer’s disease, and breast cancer.

    Why does aluminum free deodorant not work?

    “If something’s not working for you right away, it’s because it’s adjusted to the old way of doing things,” says Guzzo. Give a new product a few weeks to start fully working, but if it’s still leaving you stinking after that, it’s probably not the right formulation for your skin chemistry.

    What is the safest underarm deodorant to use?

    The Best Aluminum-Free Deodorants 1 Chemistry AHA Serum Deodorant. Kosas. 2 Zero Aluminum Pomegranate & Lemon Verbena Deodorant. Dove Beauty. No Essential Oils. 4 0% Aluminum Odor Protect Deodorant Stick. 5 The Deodorant. Fragrance-Free. 7 Secret Aluminum Free Deodorant Lavender. 8 Sunny Pits Daily Deodorant.

    How do you detox your armpits?

    Most armpit detoxes use a homemade mask of bentonite clay and apple cider vinegar. Some also include water to dilute the vinegar. Others use equal parts bentonite clay and coconut oil for a more soothing, hydrating mix that still has some antibacterial properties, thanks to the coconut oil.

    Why do they put aluminum in deodorant?

    Aluminum compounds are used extensively in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. In antiperspirants, aluminum salts are the ingredients that prevent sweating. The salts need to dissolve to block sweat from forming on the surface of your pores.

    Is aluminum free deodorant natural?

    On the other hand, natural deodorants are typically made without aluminum. They’re designed to keep you smelling fresh for hours with bacteria-sopping ingredients, including familiar favorites like baking soda.

    What are the symptoms of aluminum toxicity?

    Symptoms Confusion. Muscle weakness. Bone pain, deformities, and fractures. Seizures. Speech problems. Slow growth—in children.

    Does aluminum cause dementia?

    Current research provides no convincing evidence that exposure to trace elements of aluminum is connected to the development of dementia. Aluminum has been studied for over 40 years as a substance that might be linked to dementia.

    Does aluminum make your armpits dark?

    Body odour is a common problem in the summer and many deodorants contain aluminum salts that dry out the sweat but in turn clog the pores, often leading to darkening of the underarms.

    How long do you smell after switching to natural deodorant?

    Your body should have fully adjusted to natural deodorant. It can take up to 30 days for your body to regulate itself, though for some people the detox stage is shorter. You can now continue using natural deodorant every day to neutralise the smell of daily body odour.

    What happens to your body when you switch to natural deodorant?

    During the transition to using a natural deodorant, you may find that you get a reaction (itchy pits, or a rash). If you’ve been using conventional deodorant or antiperspirant for years, it can take 2-4 weeks to detox and release all of the aluminum in your pits that’s been preventing you from sweating.

    How long should you detox your armpits before switching to natural deodorant?

    Your body should have fully adjusted to natural deodorant. It can take up to 30 days for your body to regulate itself, though for some people the detox stage is shorter. You can now continue using natural deodorant every day to neutralize the smell of daily body odor.

    Why do my armpits smell no matter what deodorant I use?

    The odor can be caused by poor hygiene or not using the right products. Or there may be an underlying medical condition that needs to be treated. Using an over-the-counter (OTC) antiperspirant or deodorant (or a combination antiperspirant-deodorant) daily, after your shower, can help remedy armpit odor.

    Do you have to detox before using natural deodorant?

    Conventional deodorants filled with harmful chemicals clog up your pores and prevent your body from natural detoxing, a.k.a sweating. Years of using pore-clogging deodorant changes your body’s bacteria and will require a detox and a switch to a more natural solution.

    Why is it better to use natural deodorant?

    One of the benefits of natural deodorant is that it may even help your health. The natural ingredients make it less likely that you’ll have skin issues, but the lack of pore-blocking ingredients mean good bacteria works better and may prevent odor even when you have no deodorant on at all.

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    Why is it better to use aluminum free deodorant ...
  • What are the benefits of aluminum free deodorant?

    Some benefits of using an aluminum-free deodorant may include:Allowing your body to sweat freely using its natural process.Avoiding aluminum in your beauty products.Unclogged armpit pores.Less armpit irritation.Increased natural detoxification of the body through sweating.Odor masking and prevention with pleasant, often natural fragrances such as lavender, citrus and rosemary. More items...

    Key takeaways:

    • Some ingredients in popular deodorants and antiperspirants have been loosely associated with certain health conditions, like breast cancer. 

    • Most studies don’t show a definitive link between these ingredients and conditions like cancer, but more research needs to be done.

    • Switching to natural deodorant can be a good option for people concerned about any health risks. 

    Deodorants and antiperspirants are a part of most people’s daily routine. Some common ingredients in them, including aluminum and parabens, have been linked with different health conditions, like breast cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. So far, most studies haven’t proven these associations, but many people are switching to more natural products. 

    Here, we’ll review the differences between deodorants and antiperspirants, the ingredients that have been linked to health problems, and how to switch to a more natural product. 

    Yes. In general, deodorants and antiperspirants are safe when used as directed. But there have been concerns about certain ingredients being linked to some health problems, causing people to switch to more natural products. 

    Before reviewing some of these concerns, it’s helpful to understand the differences between deodorants and antiperspirants and why we use them. 

    What causes body odor?

    Sweating can be hard to deal with, but it’s a normal and healthy part of life. The main reason you sweat is to cool off, but it also happens in response to things like stress and hormones.

    You have millions of sweat glands over your entire body. Most of them are eccrine glands, which are everywhere, but most are concentrated on your palms and soles. The other type of sweat gland, called apocrine glands, is located mainly in your armpits and genital area.

    Sweat itself doesn’t actually have an odor. Smell develops when sweat from apocrine glands comes into contact with bacteria that live on your skin. These bacteria break down parts of sweat, which produces the characteristic odor we know as “body odor.”

    Difference between antiperspirants and deodorants

    Deodorants and antiperspirants do different things. Deodorants reduce smell, while antiperspirants reduce sweat. Here’s how they work:

    • Deodorants eliminate or reduce bacteria with alcohol or other chemicals that kill bacteria (called antimicrobial). They can also have fragrances or other compounds to mask odors.

    • Antiperspirants use compounds like aluminum to block sweat. The aluminum reacts with sweat and forms a plug inside the sweat duct, keeping sweat from coming out. Antiperspirants also treat excessive sweating (called hyperhidrosis). They are available in over-the-counter and prescription strengths.

    Are deodorants and antiperspirants regulated? 

    Yes. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates deodorants as cosmetic products and antiperspirants as over-the-counter drugs. This means they have the same FDA rules as other over-the counter medications.

    As mentioned above, aluminum is the main active ingredient in antiperspirants because it works well to prevent sweating. It comes in different strengths and can be listed under different names, including:

    • Aluminum chlorohydrate

    • Aluminum zirconium

    • Aluminum dichlorohydrex

    Keep in mind that you’re exposed to aluminum in many ways other than just antiperspirants. Aluminum is present naturally in certain foods and water, and it’s also used in:

    • Processed foods

    • Household items (like aluminum foil and cooking utensils)

    • Cosmetic products (like antiperspirants and toothpaste)

    • Medications (like antacids)

    Studies have shown that very little aluminum (0.012%) is actually absorbed through the skin from antiperspirants, but this may vary from person to person. 

    There have been various health concerns associated with antiperspirants and deodorants. Most of them have to do with aluminum exposure, but some are about other potentially harmful ingredients.

    We’ll review some of the main health concerns here. 

    Breast cancer risk 

    The link between aluminum in antiperspirants and breast cancer has been questioned for many years. There has been concern that the aluminum accumulates in breast tissue, where it can act like estrogen, a hormone linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. 

    Several studies have looked at this question. Most have shown that there is no increased risk of cancer from using deodorants or antiperspirants. Some studies, including a more recent one, have pointed to a possible increased risk of breast cancer when underarm products are started at a younger age. But the studies weren’t conclusive, and scientists need more accurate data before they can definitively answer this question.

    At this point, no definitive link has been established that these products can cause cancer, but more research needs to be done looking at this question.

    Alzheimer’s disease

    Exposure to aluminum has also been associated with Alzheimer’s disease. One reason for this is that aluminum was found in brain lesions (called amyloid plaques) that can cause Alzheimer’s disease. But aluminum has also been found in normal, healthy brains, so it’s not clear what the relationship is — if any — between aluminum and Alzheimer’s.

    Several studies have also looked at this association. One showed that drinking water with high levels of aluminum could be a risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease, but most other studies have not proven this link.

    So far, the research doesn’t show any definitive link between aluminum exposure and Alzheimer’s disease.

    Kidney disease

    There have also been concerns about too much aluminum exposure in people with kidney disease, because their kidneys may not be able to remove it. In reality, the risk for this is very low, but people with late-stage chronic kidney disease should talk to their provider before using an antiperspirant.

    Other chemicals

    Some of these chemicals in deodorants and antiperspirants have also been linked to different health problems:

    • Parabens are artificial preservatives. Some research shows that parabens may affect hormones (like estrogen), which could lead to breast cancer. So far, though, studies haven’t shown this to be definitively true. 

    • Triclosan is a chemical used to kill bacteria that may be linked to reproductive and thyroid problems, as well as an increased risk of asthma. 

    • Phthalates are compounds that help deodorant stick to the skin. They may affect how your body produces and uses the testosterone hormone and how your baby develops if you’re pregnant. 

    • Fragrance is a common ingredient in scented products, but it doesn’t specifically mean one thing. It could refer to many different chemicals, and it’s a common cause of skin allergies. 

    So far, studies don’t prove that popular deodorants and antiperspirants are bad for our health. But people may still switch to natural deodorants for many different reasons: 

    • To avoid a certain chemical ingredient

    • To lower their exposure to different chemicals and potential toxins

    • To avoid any skin irritation they may have with antiperspirants 

    • For peace of mind

    Keep in mind that the term “natural” on cosmetics is not defined or regulated by the FDA. This means that natural products could still have problematic ingredients in them or contain different chemicals. 

    What are some common ingredients in natural deodorant and how do they work?

    If you’re shopping for natural deodorants, knowing what’s in them can be helpful. The Environmental Working Group has a database where you can search for products and review their ingredients.

    Here are some common ingredients in natural deodorant and how they work:

    • Absorbent ingredients include different powders, like baking soda and arrowroot, to absorb wetness. 

    • Essential oils, like rosemary, tea tree oil, and sage, provide fragrance and may also kill bacteria.

    • Natural oils like coconut oil may form the base of the deodorant. 

    Like with traditional deodorants and antiperspirants, you may need to try different natural products before you find one that works for you. 

    Some ingredients in popular deodorants and antiperspirants have been associated with different health conditions, like breast cancer. Most studies so far don’t prove this association, but more research needs to be done. Switching to natural deodorant may be a good option for people concerned about any health risks. 

    What Are The Benefits Of Aluminum Free Deodorant?
  • Why aluminum in deodorant is so dangerous?

    Why aluminum in deodorant is so dangerous? Aluminum is the primary ingredient included in antiperspirant deodorants. This metal is used to “block” the sweat glands, decreasing a person’s sweat by an average of 20%. The problem with aluminum is that it can pose serious health risks, like Alzheimer’s Disease and breast cancer .

    Yesterday evening over a glass of wine, the conversation turned (as well it might on a humid New York day) to sweat and the need for any self-respecting woman in a designer blouse to protect her underarms at all costs. But could the cost be too high? As my friend pointed out, deodorant commonly contains aluminum. "Everyone I know is scared of aluminum", she said.

    Europeans don't like aluminum much. Aluminum cookware is considered toxic. But is it the same kind of aluminum in deodorant? My bathroom cabinet revealed a roll-on made by Clinique ( for 2oz). It contains a 20% concentration of the active ingredient aluminum chlorohydrate.

    What Is Aluminum in Deodorant? Is Aluminum in Deodorant Harmful?

    Aluminum chlorohydrate is a group of salts that is made by reacting aluminum with hydrochloric acid. Its most common use is in deodorants and antiperspirants because it alters the pH balance of the skin and the production of sweat. There was a scare a few years ago that aluminum chlorohydrate caused breast cancer. In 2002, the National Cancer Institute said there was no link.

    Since then, deodorant makers have used aluminum with impunity. The thing is that while aluminum in deodorant  may not cause cancer, it is well proven that aluminum is a neurotoxin that can alter the function of the blood-brain barrier. There was a study on this as long ago as 1989 and many more since (although no one seems to know what the basis for it being a toxin is).

    Auminum is poorly absorbed and efficiently eliminated. If, however, it is absorbed then it gets to the lungs, liver and kidneys. The Risk Assessment Information System, sponsored by the US Dept of Energy, says that it "may be involved" in Alzheimer's and Parkinsons.

    Is Aluminum in Deodorant Worth the Risks?

    So is using a deodorant with aluminum in it worth whatever health risk there might be? Probably not. According to one German study on 97 adults, it doesn't even work that well at preventing perspiration (and if applied whilst perspiring doesn't work at all). Another study showed an aluminum-based deodorant to be 38% effective — at best. This was a lotion. The stick form didn't work at all.

    Alternatives to Deodorants with Aluminum

    On balance, I have decided to trash my Clinique roll-on. But what to replace it with? Weleda does a nice natural one with lemon. However, it really just keeps odor at bay; it doesn't keep you dry. In fact, that appears to be true for most "natural" and/or aluminum-free products. They even proclaim proudly that you will sweat, that sweating is normal and even good for you (expels toxins). Forget that. I want to be dry. More research is needed but I have seen a good review of Alvera Aloe Based Roll-on.

    UPDATE 6/22: I've just put Alvera Aloe Based Roll-on to the test (27-minute workout on the rowing machine). It is good at neutralizing pongs but absolutely hopeless at keeping armpits dry.

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    Is Aluminum in Deodorant Dangerous - Truth In Aging
The Benefits of Natural (Aluminum-Free) Deodorant ...

Deodorants eliminate or reduce bacteria with alcohol or other chemicals that kill bacteria (called antimicrobial). They can also have fragrances or other compounds to mask odors. Antiperspirants use compounds like aluminum to block sweat. The aluminum reacts with sweat and forms a plug inside the sweat duct, keeping sweat from coming out.

Key takeaways:

  • Some ingredients in popular deodorants and antiperspirants have been loosely associated with certain health conditions, like breast cancer. 

  • Most studies don’t show a definitive link between these ingredients and conditions like cancer, but more research needs to be done.

  • Switching to natural deodorant can be a good option for people concerned about any health risks. 

Deodorants and antiperspirants are a part of most people’s daily routine. Some common ingredients in them, including aluminum and parabens, have been linked with different health conditions, like breast cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. So far, most studies haven’t proven these associations, but many people are switching to more natural products. 

Here, we’ll review the differences between deodorants and antiperspirants, the ingredients that have been linked to health problems, and how to switch to a more natural product. 

Yes. In general, deodorants and antiperspirants are safe when used as directed. But there have been concerns about certain ingredients being linked to some health problems, causing people to switch to more natural products. 

Before reviewing some of these concerns, it’s helpful to understand the differences between deodorants and antiperspirants and why we use them. 

What causes body odor?

Sweating can be hard to deal with, but it’s a normal and healthy part of life. The main reason you sweat is to cool off, but it also happens in response to things like stress and hormones.

You have millions of sweat glands over your entire body. Most of them are eccrine glands, which are everywhere, but most are concentrated on your palms and soles. The other type of sweat gland, called apocrine glands, is located mainly in your armpits and genital area.

Sweat itself doesn’t actually have an odor. Smell develops when sweat from apocrine glands comes into contact with bacteria that live on your skin. These bacteria break down parts of sweat, which produces the characteristic odor we know as “body odor.”

Difference between antiperspirants and deodorants

Deodorants and antiperspirants do different things. Deodorants reduce smell, while antiperspirants reduce sweat. Here’s how they work:

  • Deodorants eliminate or reduce bacteria with alcohol or other chemicals that kill bacteria (called antimicrobial). They can also have fragrances or other compounds to mask odors.

  • Antiperspirants use compounds like aluminum to block sweat. The aluminum reacts with sweat and forms a plug inside the sweat duct, keeping sweat from coming out. Antiperspirants also treat excessive sweating (called hyperhidrosis). They are available in over-the-counter and prescription strengths.

Are deodorants and antiperspirants regulated? 

Yes. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates deodorants as cosmetic products and antiperspirants as over-the-counter drugs. This means they have the same FDA rules as other over-the counter medications.

As mentioned above, aluminum is the main active ingredient in antiperspirants because it works well to prevent sweating. It comes in different strengths and can be listed under different names, including:

  • Aluminum chlorohydrate

  • Aluminum zirconium

  • Aluminum dichlorohydrex

Keep in mind that you’re exposed to aluminum in many ways other than just antiperspirants. Aluminum is present naturally in certain foods and water, and it’s also used in:

  • Processed foods

  • Household items (like aluminum foil and cooking utensils)

  • Cosmetic products (like antiperspirants and toothpaste)

  • Medications (like antacids)

Studies have shown that very little aluminum (0.012%) is actually absorbed through the skin from antiperspirants, but this may vary from person to person. 

There have been various health concerns associated with antiperspirants and deodorants. Most of them have to do with aluminum exposure, but some are about other potentially harmful ingredients.

We’ll review some of the main health concerns here. 

Breast cancer risk 

The link between aluminum in antiperspirants and breast cancer has been questioned for many years. There has been concern that the aluminum accumulates in breast tissue, where it can act like estrogen, a hormone linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. 

Several studies have looked at this question. Most have shown that there is no increased risk of cancer from using deodorants or antiperspirants. Some studies, including a more recent one, have pointed to a possible increased risk of breast cancer when underarm products are started at a younger age. But the studies weren’t conclusive, and scientists need more accurate data before they can definitively answer this question.

At this point, no definitive link has been established that these products can cause cancer, but more research needs to be done looking at this question.

Alzheimer’s disease

Exposure to aluminum has also been associated with Alzheimer’s disease. One reason for this is that aluminum was found in brain lesions (called amyloid plaques) that can cause Alzheimer’s disease. But aluminum has also been found in normal, healthy brains, so it’s not clear what the relationship is — if any — between aluminum and Alzheimer’s.

Several studies have also looked at this association. One showed that drinking water with high levels of aluminum could be a risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease, but most other studies have not proven this link.

So far, the research doesn’t show any definitive link between aluminum exposure and Alzheimer’s disease.

Kidney disease

There have also been concerns about too much aluminum exposure in people with kidney disease, because their kidneys may not be able to remove it. In reality, the risk for this is very low, but people with late-stage chronic kidney disease should talk to their provider before using an antiperspirant.

Other chemicals

Some of these chemicals in deodorants and antiperspirants have also been linked to different health problems:

  • Parabens are artificial preservatives. Some research shows that parabens may affect hormones (like estrogen), which could lead to breast cancer. So far, though, studies haven’t shown this to be definitively true. 

  • Triclosan is a chemical used to kill bacteria that may be linked to reproductive and thyroid problems, as well as an increased risk of asthma. 

  • Phthalates are compounds that help deodorant stick to the skin. They may affect how your body produces and uses the testosterone hormone and how your baby develops if you’re pregnant. 

  • Fragrance is a common ingredient in scented products, but it doesn’t specifically mean one thing. It could refer to many different chemicals, and it’s a common cause of skin allergies. 

So far, studies don’t prove that popular deodorants and antiperspirants are bad for our health. But people may still switch to natural deodorants for many different reasons: 

  • To avoid a certain chemical ingredient

  • To lower their exposure to different chemicals and potential toxins

  • To avoid any skin irritation they may have with antiperspirants 

  • For peace of mind

Keep in mind that the term “natural” on cosmetics is not defined or regulated by the FDA. This means that natural products could still have problematic ingredients in them or contain different chemicals. 

What are some common ingredients in natural deodorant and how do they work?

If you’re shopping for natural deodorants, knowing what’s in them can be helpful. The Environmental Working Group has a database where you can search for products and review their ingredients.

Here are some common ingredients in natural deodorant and how they work:

  • Absorbent ingredients include different powders, like baking soda and arrowroot, to absorb wetness. 

  • Essential oils, like rosemary, tea tree oil, and sage, provide fragrance and may also kill bacteria.

  • Natural oils like coconut oil may form the base of the deodorant. 

Like with traditional deodorants and antiperspirants, you may need to try different natural products before you find one that works for you. 

Some ingredients in popular deodorants and antiperspirants have been associated with different health conditions, like breast cancer. Most studies so far don’t prove this association, but more research needs to be done. Switching to natural deodorant may be a good option for people concerned about any health risks. 

Is Aluminum in Deodorant and Does It Matter?

30-09-2020 · Deodorants, for the most part, don’t use aluminum as an ingredient. Medical research shows that aluminum from antiperspirants can build up in …

30-09-2020

A lot of people use deodorant or antiperspirant every day. These two products are both effective ways to manage sweating, but they work differently:

  • Deodorants deodorize, or make sweat smell “better.”
  • Antiperspirants make you sweat, or perspire, less.

Aluminum isn’t normally found in deodorants. Most antiperspirants, on the other hand, do contain aluminum.

Person holding two kinds of deodorant trying to decide what to buyShare on Pinterest
sergeyryzhov/Getty Images

Two-in-one products — meaning they’re both a deodorant and an antiperspirant — will also include aluminum.

Antiperspirants help you sweat less by blocking your pores, the tiny openings in your skin that sweat comes out of. These antisweating products contain many ingredients, including aluminum salts.

Aluminum salts are also called aluminum chlorohydrate. The salts dissolve on your skin and “melt” into your pores. This helps plug up your pores and stop some of your sweat.

Doctors and dermatologists use prescription antiperspirants to treat health conditions, like hyperhidrosis, that cause too much sweating. This medicated antiperspirant has about 10 to 30 percent aluminum salts — much higher than the amount of aluminum in drugstore antiperspirants.

The most common concern about aluminum in antiperspirants and other skin care products is that it’s linked to breast cancers.

The American Cancer Society notes that there’s no scientific evidence that using antiperspirants causes or worsens breast cancers. What is known, however, is that aluminum salts from antiperspirants may be absorbed through your skin and collect in breast tissue.

A 2018 medical study shows that too much aluminum may change how the body makes or responds to the female hormone estrogen. Changes in the endocrine (hormone) system can be harmful for your body over time.

Another medical study from 2017 asked 209 women with breast cancer and 209 women without breast cancer how often they used antiperspirants and for how long. The group with breast cancer self-reported that they used antiperspirants several times a day, beginning before age 30.

The control group of women without breast cancer self-reported that they used antiperspirants less. Both groups had aluminum salts in their breast tissue; however, women who said they used antiperspirants often had a higher concentration of aluminum salts.

Medical research on whether aluminum causes cancer isn’t clear.

summary

Aluminum from antiperspirants may build up in breast tissue after years of use. Aluminum does have the ability to disrupt your endocrine system, but there’s no scientific evidence to show that aluminum from antiperspirants causes breast cancer. More research is needed.

Kidney disease

Your kidneys help get rid of aluminum and other waste products in your body. The National Kidney Foundation advises that it’s not possible to absorb enough aluminum through your skin to damage your kidneys.

precautions if you have chronic kidney disease

The National Kidney Foundation advises avoiding skin care products with aluminum if you already have chronic stage 4 kidney disease. Kidneys that are working at a level of only 30 percent can’t clear out aluminum fast enough. This may allow it to build up in your body and trigger health problems.

Memory problems

According to the National Kidney Foundation, scientists noticed that some people with chronic kidney disease and high levels of aluminum in their bodies also developed dementia, an age-related memory condition. But most of these patients had high aluminum from medications, not from antiperspirants.

A 2018 meta-analysis found that adults with Alzheimer’s disease had higher levels of metals like aluminum, mercury, and cadmium in their blood. These metals were thought to be from their environment, however, not from antiperspirant.

More research is needed to find out whether aluminum or other metals in the body are linked to these memory conditions.

summary

While groups with memory conditions have been shown in scientific research to also have higher levels of aluminum in their system, the sources impacting those levels are more likely to relate to medication and diet.

Antiperspirants contain aluminum to help you sweat less. Deodorants, for the most part, don’t use aluminum as an ingredient.

Medical research shows that aluminum from antiperspirants can build up in your body. There’s no scientific evidence that directly links aluminum to cancers and other health conditions, though. Plus, you’re more likely to get aluminum from other sources.

Still, this medical evidence leads experts to advise that antiperspirant use isn’t a good idea for everyone, especially those with severe chronic kidney disease.

Be sure to always check the ingredients on your skin care products before buying or using them.

Ask a Dermatologist: Why Is Aluminum in Deodorant Bad?

Does Aluminum in Antiperspirants Have Any Negative Side Effects? You may feel hotter: According to Zalka, the plugging of sweat ducts impedes the natural physiologic process of... Underarm irritation: You may find that aluminum-containing deodorants can lead to …

We’ve all been there: We run out of our favorite deodorant only to head to the store (or hop online) to mindlessly pick up a refill. After all, if you’ve used it for years, why quit? Well, if new deodorant launches are any indication, one reason to switch things up is to avoid certain ingredients (ahem, aluminum) in favor of a cleaner, greener, potentially safer underarm routine. But, is it really necessary? We chatted with a couple of dermatologists to find out. Ahead, learn what aluminum is, how it works, whether or not it’s safe, and more.

Meet the Expert

  • Alicia Zalka is a board-certified dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Yale School of Medicine. She's also the founder of dermatologist-developed "anti-odorant" brand Surface Deep.
  • Michele Green is a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and Yale graduate based on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Additionally, she's been named one of New York Magazine's Best Doctors in NYC.

Aluminum is not only an element, it’s also the most abundant metal on earth, existing naturally within the earth’s core. As much as we love talking about mother nature, today we’re here to focus on aluminum as it pertains to deodorant. With this in mind, Zalka points out that aluminum salts, such as aluminum chloride, aluminum zirconium, and aluminum chlorohydrate are the most common ingredients in antiperspirants.

The reason these salts are used so prevalently is because of their sweat- and odor-blocking properties.

While the term deodorant is used as a catchall term, Green explains that true deodorants don’t contain aluminum, nor do they prevent sweating—it’s antiperspirants that do. Instead, deodorants are solely-designed to control odor. 

Nevertheless, let’s speak to the safety of aluminum in underarm products. According to Zalka, there is no clear-cut answer about whether or not aluminum is safe or not. “Some theories have linked aluminum in antiperspirants to both breast cancer and Alzheimer’s disease,” she points out. “However, to date, there have been no clear-cut medical studies that have proved a cause and effect link.”

Because there’s no hard conclusion, Green says that aluminum is plenty safe in antiperspirants (remember: while users might refer to antiperspirants as deodorants, true deodorants don't contain aluminum). 

If you’ve ever used an antiperspirant, you’ve experienced first-hand how the product helps to reduce sweat and odor. But how? “Simply put, aluminum, when exposed to sweat, creates a gel-like substance that plugs up sweat ducts in the skin, thus temporarily blocking the ability of sweat to reach the skin surface,” Zalka explains. While that’s certainly helpful in the moment, we can’t help but wonder the effect that has long term. Which helps us segue into the next section.

  • You may feel hotter: According to Zalka, the plugging of sweat ducts impedes the natural physiologic process of sweating, which is the body's natural process for cooling off. By plugging these sweat ducts, you may find yourself overheating more easily.
  • Underarm irritation: You may find that aluminum-containing deodorants can lead to irritation, rashes, little underarm pimples, and even color changes of the skin, though even this is inconclusive (as antiperspirants often contain fragrance or other potential allergens as well).
Aluminum often stains: What’s more, if you’ve ever wondered why you can’t seem to keep a white tee looking white, aluminum is to blame. Some claim that when the ingredient combines with sweat, it creates a yellow tint that can be nearly impossible to remove. So, if your main goal is to keep your whites crisp as can be, it’s time to ditch antiperspirant in favor of aluminum-free deo.

Stains aside, Zalka takes us back to the main point. “My premise is, sweat is intentional, odor is preventable,” she begins. “If you sweat a normal amount and do not suffer from the medical condition known as hyperhidrosis, why block sweat glands unnecessarily?”

The undeniable benefit of aluminum in antiperspirants is that it prevents moisture on the skin, Zalka says point-blank. “Sweating can be embarrassing at times so using antiperspirants containing aluminum can help prevent those embarrassing moments,” Green adds.

And since Green says that there are no recent indications that these products could actually cause any harm—given they’ve been studied for decades and have never been proven—if your goal is to block odor and sweat, aluminum in deodorant is a safe option to consider.

The simple possibility or hint of negative side effects, paired with the beauty industry’s ever-growing pursuit to become more natural, has led to many brands ditching aluminum in favor of greener underarm odor fighters. To save you from endlessly scanning the backs of deodorant tubes, ahead you’ll find five of our faves. 

Drunk Elephant Sweet Pitti Deodorant Cream

Drunk Elephant Sweet Pitti

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This aluminum-free deodorant not only keeps odor under wraps, it soothes underarms while delivering a delicious almond scent in the process.

Necessaire Deodorant

Nécessaire The Deodorant

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Designed with a fresh eucalyptus scent, Nécessaire’s aluminum-free deodorant uses a series of safe acids (like lactic and mandelic) and minerals (like silica and kaolin clay) meant to keep body odor under control.

Native Deodorant

Native Women’s Deodorant

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The coolest part about this aluminum-free deodorant is that it comes with the option to create a custom scent based on a quick questionnaire. Prefer to pick a pre-made scent? Choose from a variety of classic and seasonal scents.

Surface Deep Anti-Odorant Pads

Surface Deep Anti-Odorant Pads

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Formulated with glycolic acid, these aluminum-free deodorant pads are designed to keep odor at bay for up to 24 hours. They promise to gently exfoliate dead skin and build-up to inhibit bacteria from harboring under the arms.

Myro Deodorant

Myro Plant-Powered Deodorant

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Available in six delicious scents, this aluminum-free deodorant is super fun for anyone who loves a pop of color, as you get to pick the color of the minimalist, label-free tube it comes in.

Byrdie takes every opportunity to use high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial guidelines to learn more about how we keep our content accurate, reliable and trustworthy.

  1. Kanlayavattanakul M, Lourith N. Body malodours and their topical treatment agents. Int J Cosmet Sci. 2011;33(4):298-311. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2494.2011.00649.x

  2. Karsai S, Weiß C, Lütgerath C, Ott I, Faulhaber J. Comparison of Novel Aluminium Lactate Versus Aluminium Chloride-based Antiperspirant in Excessive Axillary Perspiration: First Prospective Cohort Study. Dermatol Ther. 2021;34(4):e15020. doi:10.1111/dth.15020

Is Aluminum in Deodorant Bad for You? How Aluminum Affects ...

16-08-2021 · The aluminum doesn't actually make you produce less sweat, but it makes sure your underarms don't get wet. Aluminum in deodorant typically comes in the form of aluminum chlorohydrate.

16-08-2021
is aluminum deodorant bad for you

nastya_phGetty Images

On "wellness" websites and in gossip between friends, a strange trend has taken hold: something as banal and every day as swiping on antiperspirant has become as taboo as smoking a pack of cigarettes or lying in a tanning bed. The reason? Aluminum. "Natural" and "aluminum-free" deodorants have begun cropping up everywhere, even in mainstay antiperspirant brands like Secret and Dove. Below, find out what aluminum is, why the ingredient has become so controversial, and whether or not you should swap out your normal deodorant for a natural one.

What is aluminum, and why is it in deodorants?

Aluminum is a metal that's used in antiperspirants — which are different from deodorant. "Antiperspirants are products designed to reduce wetness on the skin, while deodorants neutralize odor," says Dr. Joshua Zeichner, MD, Associate Professor of Dermatology and Director of Cosmetic & Clinical Research in Dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Deodorants don't help block sweat like antiperspirants do — they just help mask odor.

"Antiperspirants contain aluminum base salts that form a plug within the sweat gland, physically blocking sweat from reaching the surface of the skin," says Dr. Zeichner. The aluminum doesn't actually make you produce less sweat, but it makes sure your underarms don't get wet. Aluminum in deodorant typically comes in the form of aluminum chlorohydrate.

Is aluminum in antiperspirants harmful?

When it comes to being worried about aluminum in deodorant, the two main concerns are breast cancer and Alzheimer's disease.

  • Alzheimer's disease: "There have been studies that show increased aluminum deposits in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's, but that doesn't mean that the aluminum is necessarily coming from deodorant or antiperspirant use," says Dr. Elizabeth Comen, M.D., medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.
  • Breast cancer: There is a retrospective study that shows there is an earlier age for breast cancer diagnosis with patients who use aluminum-based antiperspirants more frequently, but since the study was retrospective, it has been deemed inconclusive. Other studies look at the incidence of breast cancer in the upper quadrant of the breast near the underarm, and whether that correlates to antiperspirant use.

Can aluminum-based antiperspirant cause breast cancer or Alzheimer's?

"Despite much media attention, there’s no data showing a causal relationship between the use of aluminum containing anti-perspirant and harmful effects to your skin," says Dr. Zeichner.

According to Dr. Comen, many of the studies that have come out surrounding concerns about breast cancer or Alzheimer's disease are flawed — either because they're retrospective, which always risks recall bias, or they assume that correlation implies causation. "There's simply no evidence that aluminum causes breast cancer or [that] it causes Alzheimer's," she agrees.

If you're worried about your body absorbing aluminum through your underarms, you can take comfort in knowing that it's highly unlikely your body is absorbing any significant degree of aluminum through the skin, especially if you only use antiperspirant in a small area and on unbroken skin, according to Dr. Zeichner. In fact, one study found that only 0.012 percent of the aluminum in deodorant is absorbed through underarms — which is significantly less than you would absorb from eating aluminum-rich food (think fish, vegetables and roots).

Should I switch to natural deodorant?

At this point, both Dr. Zeichner and Dr. Comen say that it isn't necessary to switch to natural deodorant. It all depends on your personal concerns and what you'll feel comfortable with. "If wetness is an issue, then I do recommend aluminum-based antiperspirants," says Dr. Zeichner. "If body odor is your main concern, then an aluminum-free deodorant may be the right option."

This it true even if you have the BRCA gene or are actively being treated for breast cancer — though in the case of the former, make sure you speak to your doctor, as your skin might be extra sensitive to many ingredients, including aluminum.

Of course, there's no harm in switching to a natural deodorant if you're worried. "If people are really concerned, even despite the evidence against specific evidence linking aluminum to breast cancer, people can make the choice to use deodorants without aluminum," says Dr. Comen. You can also choose to switch off, and only use aluminum-containing deodorant on occasions where you may sweat more (like running a race or going to a workout class).

What other ways can I prevent cancer and disease?

Often, fears surrounding deodorant are tied to legitimate fears of getting a scary diagnosis. There are plenty of ways to try to maintain your health, like eating a healthy diet, exercising and reducing your alcohol consumption. "The same woman that may be obsessing about her deodorant might be having three glasses of wine at night, not knowing that wine is a proven carcinogen," says Dr. Comen. It's also helpful to know your family history, and talk to your doctor about how to make healthy choices based on your personal risk factors.

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Is Switching to Aluminum Free Deodorant Going to Be Easy ...

Itching, burning, rash. Apparently, you go through a form of armpit detox when switching to aluminum free deodorant. This was something I’d never even heard of, because, well, I didn’t know anyone who’d done this. When I began noticing that I couldn’t stop scratching my armpits, I began to worry. It was so bad that I discussed with my ...

This post contains affiliate links which may earn me commissions should you click through them and take certain actions. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. See full disclosure here.

Switching to aluminum free deodorant was no easy feat.  Can you believe it took me a year to find the best natural deodorant that didn’t give me a rash OR make me stink?

Last year, I told you a bit about motherhood with an autoimmune disease.  I may have even bored you with some sciency details about Hashimoto’s.  I’d planned on continuing the series to help moms with health issues feel understood and seek appropriate care for themselves.

The truth about that health phase is the content I was writing I just didn’t feel very passionate about.  I mean, on a personal level, sure I enjoyed hearing all the sciency crap my doctor spewed at me as we’d commiserate over my latest round of lab work.  But, I didn’t really enjoy how I was presenting it to you, so I stopped.

I’ve realized I just want to share the daily struggles and triumphs I find in living my new semi-crunchy life.

You see, living with autoimmunity and several other health concerns, you begin to see life in a new way.  When conventional medicine fails or simply doesn’t treat or improve your quality of life, you begin to question everything you ever knew about health.  And, you start seeing chemical-laden products as another way to get yourself killed.  Yes, I went into a very dark, morbid space.

2017 brought about many changes in my life, including completely revamping my beauty and cleaning routines.  I threw out many “good” products in favor of less harmful ones.  I’ve tossed hundreds of dollars of conventional, grocery-store brand makeup products and ditched toxic toothpaste, all in favor of leading a less toxic lifestyle.  But, in the search for healthier daily practices, the one I struggled with the most was switching to aluminum free deodorant!

You probably wouldn’t believe that it took me almost an entire year to find a non-toxic deodorant that was comfortable and didn’t make me smell like a hobo.  It took some serious determination and will power to not just give up and switch back to conventional, toxic deodorant.

Switching to aluminum free deodorant wasn't an easy feat. The trials I experienced in the year searching for the best natural deodorant | www.sahmplus.com

The problems with switching to aluminum free deodorant

When you begin to think about making the switch to a natural deodorant, you probably think “if it’s natural, it’s automatically good.”  Well, that was my mentality, anyway.  I’d naively assumed that switching to a natural deodorant was going to be an easy process.  Hell, I didn’t even think it would be a process.  I was certain I could just pick something off the shelf at my local health food store and be good to go.

It didn’t even remotely go as planned.

A few products in the hunt for the best natural deodorant

I’m missing a couple deodorants I tried in the search for the best natural deodorant

Itching, burning, rash

Apparently, you go through a form of armpit detox when switching to aluminum free deodorant.  This was something I’d never even heard of, because, well, I didn’t know anyone who’d done this.

When I began noticing that I couldn’t stop scratching my armpits, I began to worry.  It was so bad that I discussed with my doctor that I felt like something was wrong.

You see, I noticed a rash with my itching and thought it was razor burn, so I stopped shaving as frequently.  When that didn’t clear it up, I switched back to my conventional deodorant for a couple days and noticed less itching, but not completely gone.

So I quickly found a new aluminum free deodorant and the itching got worse.

It was so bad my husband thought I was crazy because I just couldn’t keep my hands out of my pits.  And I seriously thought I was going to die.  I’d nearly convinced myself I was developing more health problems.  So I switched again.

The stench after switching to aluminum free deodorant

My next switch was to an aluminum free, hypoallergenic deodorant.  Eventually, with this one, the itching stopped and I was thoroughly excited.  But, the excitement was squashed shortly after this switch when I began to smell horrible body odor.

My memory isn’t always the greatest, so I sometimes questioned whether or not I remembered to put on deodorant in the morning.  I had to make mental notes of actually putting it on and realized I wasn’t missing it in my morning routine.

About mid-day, the deodorant would just stop working and I’d smell horrible.  I began to feel really self-conscious about it.  If I had to see people, I’d squeeze my arms tighter hoping the smell wouldn’t emanate past me.  Then I’d worry that someone would catch on to it and think I didn’t bathe.  Or worse yet, I’d become the serious hippy chick that doesn’t even use deodorant.

Eventually I banished this deodorant after finding out that this was a specific complaint of this kind of deodorant from many people.

ditching yucky deodorant in favor of switching to aluminum free deodorant | www.sahmplus.com

I ditched conventional deodorant and the stuff that made me stink!

I almost switched back

I took a couple weeks off from the hunt for natural deodorant, switching back to my reliable (and toxic) conventional deodorant.  I was mildly disappointed in myself, but at the same time, relished in the fact I could easily get my Shipt shopper to pick up my deodorant instead of making a special trip out to a health food store.  And, I wouldn’t have to worry about completely wasting more money on an expensive natural deodorant that would make me question my health and or sanity again.

But, as luck would have it, MommyCon sent me a mystery box of products to try out in August and tucked inside among all the other healthy goodies was a fabulous lavender smelling aluminum free deodorant.

I couldn’t decide if this was fate or the universe teasing me about the months I spent insanely itching and stinking for the sake of reducing another toxin in my life.  But, I figured there was no harm in trying [easyazon_link identifier=”B071S2LHKW” locale=”US” nw=”y” nf=”y” tag=”ivsvabasaan0a-20″ cart=”n” cloak=”n” localize=”y” popups=”n”]North Coast Organics[/easyazon_link] since it didn’t cost me anything.  And I told myself I would immediately switch back if I noticed any signs of itching or irritation.

[easyazon_image align=”center” cart=”y” cloak=”n” height=”500″ identifier=”B071S2LHKW” locale=”US” localize=”y” nw=”y” nf=”y” src=”https://www.sahmplus.com/wp-content/uploads/412BVPJajV2BL.jpg” tag=”ivsvabasaan0a-20″ width=”500″]

Miraculously though, I was not only hooked on the scent, I never experienced itching, rashes, or body odor from this deodorant.

Switching to aluminum free deodorant wasn't an easy feat. The trials I experienced in the year searching for the best natural deodorant | www.sahmplus.comFinding the best natural deodorant wasn't easy! Here's the crazy year I spent switching to aluminum free deodorant and what I found to work ... finally | www.sahmplus.com

Exciting for kids, easy for parents!
5 Benefits of Switching To Aluminum-Free Deodorant

Thinking about switching to an aluminum-free deodorant? Here are 5 benefits you'll want to consider.

When walking down the grooming aisle, in person or online, you can’t help but notice the growing array of aluminum-free deodorant options. Why do people like them so much? And can switching to aluminum-free deodorant be a healthy alternative to your current routine? Let’s cover the basics first. 

Antiperspirant vs. Conventional Deodorant vs. Natural, Aluminum-Free Deodorant

Antiperspirants are the aluminum-laced products that natural deodorants aim to replace. Antiperspirants trap sweat inside your sweat glands before it’s released, so it never mixes with underarm bacteria to create body odor. Typically, these products use aluminum (yes, like the foil) ground up very finely and incorporate it into a paste. Once it’s applied, body heat and moisture emulsify the mixture. As the area dries, the mixture gets sucked up into the sweat gland and forms a physical plug, which keeps sweat from escaping. Hence the public’s health concerns and why the benefits of aluminum-free deodorant—also called natural deodorant—are becoming so popular.

Deodorants, on the other hand, are products that fight odor and are generally aluminum-free. Most don’t claim to prevent sweat—but many conventional deodorants still use harsh chemicals that can cause your skin to react or become irritated. Some examples of these harsh chemicals are: sulfates that strip moisture and oils from your skin, irritating fragrances that can cause reactions, estrogen-mimicking preservatives like parabens, and, especially in products that act as deodorants and antiperspirants, pore-clogging metals. 

Finally, we have natural deodorants. These products are aluminum-free and aim to fight odor and absorb sweat like conventional deodorants, except that they use naturally derived ingredients to do so.

With so much information available, and much of it conflicting, it’s hard to know if switching to natural, aluminum-free deodorant is right for you. Here’s what to consider. 

5 Benefits of Switching to Aluminum-Free Deodorant

Man holding aluminum free deodorant outside on a beach

1. It’s Gentle on Skin

If you’ve ever had skin issues like rashes and inflammation, you might find relief by switching to a natural, aluminum-free deodorant. A recent study showed that antiperspirants—but not deodorants—have a clear negative effect on the human microbiome, the naturally occurring microbes that keep our skin healthy. 

Switching to an aluminum-free deodorant can certainly be a good first step to prevent irritation. However, some aluminum-free deodorants contain astringents like alcohol that kill all the bacteria on your skin to prevent odor. Alcohol is very drying for skin, and over time can lead to skin issues like rashes and inflammation. That’s why our aluminum-free deodorants use natural botanicals to control odor-causing bacteria without alcohol or other drying chemicals. It also has natural starches to control sweat quickly without pore-clogging metals—plus aloe vera to soothe your skin. 

2. For Peace of Mind

More people are being mindful of the ingredients that go into their everyday products like deodorants. Although the American Cancer Association has said there’s no concrete scientific link between aluminum-based products and cancer, for many using a natural deodorant simply puts their mind at ease by avoiding that risk altogether.

For others, aluminum-free deodorants can be a more gentle alternative to prevent reactions in sensitive skin. Ultimately it’s a personal choice, and there’s no bad reason for wanting to try aluminum-free deodorant. 

Of course it’s worth noting that no product is guaranteed to be compatible with all skin, even aluminum-free, natural deodorants. Be sure to spot test products on a small patch of skin before fully applying.

3. No More Pit Stains 

Did you know it’s the aluminum in antiperspirant that causes dark or yellow stains on your shirts? When aluminum mixes with your sweat and rubs off onto your clothing, over time it leaves behind stains that are nearly impossible to get out. Natural deodorant doesn’t contain aluminum so it’ll never leave behind unsightly stains. 

But some aluminum-free deodorants will still leave behind white marks on your clothes. To avoid them, look for deodorants without ingredients that tend to cake under your arm like talc and baking soda. Our aluminum-free deodorants have no baking soda or talc and go on clear—with no sticky or tacky texture under your arms. They also dry clear to create an invisible line of defense against odor and excess sweat. 

4. You Can Still Control Sweat

Most deodorants don’t have aluminum and don’t claim to combat sweat. But there are a few natural ingredients that let you keep sweat in check without the use of metals. 

DeAndre Hopkins controls sweat while working out with aluminum free deodorant

Our aluminum-free deodorants use cornstarch to absorb excess moisture without clumping. And our newest unscented deodorant has a different formula that uses another natural sweat-absorbing starch, arrowroot powder. They both provide powerful, natural sweat control that’s an effective alternative to the most common products. Of course they aren’t clogging your sweat glands, so you may still sweat a little—but significantly less than aluminum-free deodorant with no sweat-control ingredients. Many people actually tend to sweat less over time after they switch to a natural deodorant.

5. Because Naturally Derived Ingredients Work

Odor and sweat are nothing that our naturally derived ingredients can’t handle. From the cornstarch that absorbs sweat to the botanicals that help control odor-causing bacteria to the Aloe Vera that will soothe your skin, our ingredients are effective but still gentle on skin. 

If you’ve used antiperspirants with aluminum for years, try an aluminum-free deodorant for a few weeks. During this detox period, your body will purge all of the aluminum from your sweat glands. Be patient while your skin adjusts to the product and soon you’ll get the full benefits of using aluminum-free deodorant. 

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Is Aluminum in Deodorant Bad? Everything You Need to Know ...

05-07-2017 · There are two main health issues usually cited when talking about aluminum in deodorant: Alzheimer’s disease and breast cancer. Aluminum Deodorant and Alzheimer's Disease

05-07-2017

And aside from the cancer factor, some people are simply concerned that aluminum, and antiperspirants in general, keep the body from sweating out toxins that need to be released. “We believe sweating is a normal body function and essential to not only regulating the body temperature but ridding the body of toxins and working to keep the body healthy,” Danielle Raynor, founder of Lavanila, a natural beauty brand that offers aluminum-free deodorant, tells Teen Vogue.

What's the Argument for Aluminum in Deodorant and Antiperspirant?

Here's the thing: Thae fact that there have been studies here and there indicating links between aluminum and certain diseases doesn’t mean those links are accepted in the scientific and medical communities. As Schueller noted, that 1990 study indicating a causal link between aluminum and Alzheimer’s was discredited. And, he said, there have been more reliable studies indicating the opposite.

Fargo made the same point. “Since [those first studies in the '60s and '70s], studies have failed to confirm any role for aluminum in causing Alzheimer’s,” he says. “Experts today focus on other areas of research, and few believe that everyday sources of aluminum pose any threat.”

As for the talk of a potential link to breast cancer, experts — including the American Cancer Society — cite problems with the studies that have made that connection and the reasoning behind the various claims. “The long-standing myth around aluminum in antiperspirants operates under the belief that the aluminum present enters the body through your sweat glands,” Robert Korn, medical director of Northwell-GoHealth Urgent Care, tells Teen Vogue. “This is false, as skin acts as a barrier to your internal systems and bloodstreams, keeping the substance from getting through.... Additionally, there is no conclusive evidence to suggest a link between breast cancer and aluminum in antiperspirants.”

For its part, Secret, which sells antiperspirants containing aluminum, points to the many organizations that have denied any definite link between aluminum and cancer or Alzheimer’s disease. “An overview of the extensive research conducted on antiperspirant safety can be found on sweathelp.org, where there are quotes from the likes of the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, Alzheimer’s Association, and breastcancer.org,” Susan Biehle, a principal scientist at Procter & Gamble, which makes Secret, tells Teen Vogue. “All of these organizations report there is no scientific proof of a connection between the aluminum in antiperspirants and any of the respective diseases studied.”

And the whole “sweating out toxins” thing? Well, your body does release some toxins when you sweat, but it’s a fairly negligible amount. The real purpose of sweat is to regulate your body temperature and cool it down as needed. If you have toxins inside, those are filtered out by your liver and kidneys, and they leave your body when you go to the bathroom.

Do I Need to Start Buying Aluminum-Free Deodorant?

Right now, the overwhelming scientific and medical opinion is that you don’t have anything to worry about. “The bottom line, despite all the fearmongering you hear about aluminum in cosmetics products, [is that] the best evidence to date shows that there are no significant health concerns,” Schueller says. In terms of Alzheimer’s, specifically, although Fargo echoed Schueller’s earlier statement, he did also note that “the Alzheimer’s Association’s position is that we need more research about the actual causes of, and risk factors for, Alzheimer’s and other dementias.”

11 Weird Reasons Why Your Deodorant Might Not Be Working ...

13-04-2021 · If you find that your go-to deodorant just isn’t cutting it anymore, here are 10 reasons why your formula may no longer be working as it should.

13-04-2021

Finding the right deodorant can be a tricky task: Aluminum or no aluminum? Gel or cream? Normal or clinical strength? Just when we think we’ve nailed the perfect formula for our picky underarms, a heatwave comes along to disprove everything. 

If you find that your go-to deodorant is not working anymore, or no deodorant works at all, here are 11 common reasons why it probably isn’t doing the job it should.

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You Might Not Be Using the Right Formula

Shopping for deodorants can be ultimately confusing, especially because there are so many brands to choose from. However, New York plastic surgeon Melissa A. Doft, MD, notes that deodorant usually falls into two categories: deodorants and antiperspirants. Mary Further, founder of Kaia Naturals, a brand specializing in all-natural deodorants, says this difference is critical to understand: “The role of deodorant is to top you from smelling, while the role of antiperspirants is to stop you from sweating.”

But which one works better? Dr. Doft states that antiperspirants are usually recommended for those who sweat more, while deodorants are more helpful in neutralizing underarm bacteria and odor.

Dove dermatologist Dr. Alicia Barba adds, “If you’re looking for both odor and wetness protection, I recommend an antiperspirant with aluminum salts [her favorite is a tie between Dove Dry Spray () or Dove Advanced Care ()] that help control the flow of seat under the arms, along with deodorant to mask the smell,” she says. “If you’re looking for odor protection, Dove 0% Aluminum Deodorant () is for you.”

You Might Have Hyperhidrosis

Without a doubt, sweating is a normal part of life. However, if you find yourself perspiring more than others, you may have a genetic condition called hyperhidrosis. Some warning signs include an excessive amount of sweat, which can affect the hands, feet and armpits. “For hyperhidrosis, deodorant alone is not going to help,” explains Nanuet, NY dermatologist Heidi Waldorf, MD, who usually recommends patients with the condition start with an over-the-counter formula containing a high concentration of aluminum zirconium, plus moisturizing ingredients. The doctor’s favorites: Dove Clinical Strength Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex Gly (20 percent) or Secret Clinical Strength (also 20 percent). “Ideally the product is used at night before bed. In the morning, the patient can use a regular antiperspirant or non-antiperspirant deodorant,” says Dr. Waldorf.

If you find that you sweat more than the average person, it’s wise to have a conversation with your doctor about treatment options, as conditions like this usually aren’t treated with antiperspirants and deodorant. “You may need to take internal medication for your sweating,” says New York dermatologist Debra Jaliman, MD. “For some people, the sweating is so intense that they need to take a pill every day, called anticholinergics, to decrease the swelling.”

You Might Need an Acid-Infused Option

Deodorant brands are increasingly adding acids, particular alphahydroxy acids, into their formulas for one specific reason: “When these fruit- and plant-derived acids are added to deodorants, it’s meant to lower the pH balance of the skin, and thus limit odor-producing bacteria from growing,” explains Bay Harbor Islands dermatologist Stacy Chimento, MD. In other words, odor isn’t being masked, it’s being eliminated.

Clean beauty brand Kosas is the latest to jump onto the acid-spiked deo bandwagon with their Chemistry Deodorant (), which is also infused with hyaluronic acid, aloe and peptides. “Our end goal was to create a clean deodorant that not only keeps you from smelling, but also treats the skin with nourishing ingredients so it’s smoother, more evenly toned and bump-free,” says founder Sheena Yaitanes. “It’s a completely different approach to deodorant.”

While Dr. Chimento contends that the AHA levels in these types of products are typically low and safe to use, she does flag that if you are someone who is highly sensitive to hydroxy acids, a conversation with your dermatologist or a patch test is the best option.

You Aren’t Applying Your Formula at Night

Most of us habitually apply our deodorant onto our underarms before heading out for the day, but experts like Drs. Jaliman and Waldorf find that the best time for antiperspirant application is at night, right before bed. “Antiperspirants work best at night when the skin is dry,” says Dr. Jaliman. “The aluminum-based ingredient can easily get to the sweat gland to effectively plug the pore. It then can reduce sweating for up to 24 hours.”

Dr. Waldorf agrees, explaining a clinical-strength antiperspirant should be applied before bed to reduce overall sweat, and an antiperspirant-deodorant or deodorant should be applied alone in the morning.

Secret Deodorant launched a Night Time Treatment version (it’s lavender-scented!) of their coveted Clinical Strength deo for this very reason. “We learned from clinical testing that while Secret Clinical Strength works great when applied in the morning, it works even better when applied at night,” says Dr. Maiysha D. Jones, P&G Personal Care scientific communications manager. “Secret Clinical Strength Night Treatment () was created to make the benefit of night time application clear to the consumer. At night, your body temperature is naturally lower, and your sweat rate is too. This allows your antiperspirant to provide a stronger barrier against sweat.”

You’re Going Through a “Detox” Phase

If you recently made the popular swap from a traditional antiperspirant to an all-natural, aluminum-free deodorant, Further says we should allow our bodies 30 days or so to completely transition out of using antiperspirant. “The detox phase allows your pores to breathe again after they’ve been plugged every day for several years,” she says. “We need to let them breathe and allow what was blocked out to be released.” After about a month or so, it should be smooth sailing.

If you’re transitioning into an AHA-infused deodorant, Yaitanes says you might also go through a similar detox. “Everyone is different, so some will see results right away and some pits need a bit time to detox and adapt to the new environment,” she explains, recommending about five days or so to see full benefits.

You’re Not Treating Bacteria

Believe it or not, sweat isn’t what smells—it’s the bacteria forming in our underarms that does. “If you manage the bacteria, you’ll manage the odor,” says Further. One way to combat this smell: using an antibacterial soap before applying deodorant, “paying close attention to scrubbing the area to eliminate any bacteria,” she says. 

“To reduce foul-smelling odor, try cleansing the underarms and groin areas twice daily and after exercise/sweating with Lasercyn Spray, aka stabilized hypochlorous, which is a very safe, effective and nonirritating anti-microbial,” adds Dr. Waldorf. “We routinely use it to prepare the skin for injectables and to clean wounds. If that is not effective, see your dermatologist.”

Your Clothes Might be Making the Situation Worse

Enter another odor-inducing issue we never gave a second thought: our clothing. Further contends that synthetic fibers hold onto odor due to the nature of the weave, but “natural fibers like cotton, linen and bamboo are woven differently and allow odor to move through the fibers instead of trapping it.”

Another thing to keep in mind? The fit. “If you’re wearing a close-cut rayon blouse on a hot day with natural deodorant on, it’s very likely you’re going to begin to smell for two reasons,” she says. “One, the tight fit will create friction in the underarm and grab onto the moisture, and two, the odor will be trapped in the fabric.”

You’re Applying on a Damp Underarm

According to Dr. Barba, before applying an antiperspirant or deodorant, we should make sure the underarm is clean and dry. If the area is wet, the moisture can fail to allow your formula to be properly absorbed.

Skin-care expert Xiomi Frans-Cuber agrees, adding that sweat and moisture usually prohibit odor and sweat-fighting ingredients from effectively penetrating the skin. “The moisture and sweat on your underarms can completely wash away your formula.”

Stress May Be to Blame

Stress can also be a surprising cause of your deodorant fails. Frans-Cuber explains that stress produces hormonal changes, which can ultimately cause an increase in odor-causing bacteria. So, while your deodorant may not exactly be to blame in this case, it’s helpful to be aware of how stress hormones can affect the performance of your deodorant.

“Hormonal changes can lead to an increase in sweat output and create a worse odor than you are probably accustomed to,” says Frans-Cuber. “So in this situation, it may not be the deodorant, but rather just a case of stress hormones.” 

Your Formula May Not Be Strong Enough

While it probably makes sense to find the strongest-smelling deodorant possible, sometimes even the most pleasant-scented products can lack the necessary antibacterial properties to neutralize any existing bacteria. If you find that that your deodorant fades too fast, try talking to doctor about treatments, which can help alleviate the problem.

“If your deodorant does not have any or the necessary antibacterial properties, it could be difficult to kill the odor-producing bacteria and minimize body odor,” explains Beverly Hills, CA, dermatologist Tsippora Shainhouse, MD. “If the odor persists after switching deodorants, see your dermatologist about prescription anti-bacterial treatments that can help reduce the bacterial load.”

You Haven’t Tried a Prescription Formula

Another one of your options includes switching to prescription formulas, which are often stronger than over-the-counter products. These formulas often contain higher concentrations of sweat-busting ingredients and work better for those who sweat a lot.

“For some people, over-the-counter antiperspirants are not strong enough and they require prescriptions,” adds Dr. Jaliman. “These are stronger antiperspirants that work better, as they have higher concentrations of the active ingredient.”

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Injections Are an Option

But, if you are looking for stronger underarm relief, Botox Cosmetic can be valid solution to excessive perspiration. Injected into the sweat glands, Newton, MA, plastic surgeon Joseph A. Russo, MD says that Botox Cosmetic effectively reduces excessive sweating by deactivating the glands responsible for perspiration. This leaves your underarms drier and free of bacteria.

“Botox can be injected into the sweat glands, which block chemical signals from key nerve endings to effectively deactivate the glands and reduce excessive sweating,” adds Dr. Russo. “It is most commonly used to control perspiration in the underarms.”

seniorcare2share.com

30-09-2021 · The Best Aluminum-Free Deodorants 1 Chemistry AHA Serum Deodorant. Kosas. 2 Zero Aluminum Pomegranate & Lemon Verbena Deodorant. Dove Beauty. No Essential Oils. 4 0% Aluminum Odor Protect Deodorant Stick. 5 The Deodorant. Fragrance-Free. 7 Secret Aluminum Free Deodorant Lavender. 8 Sunny Pits Daily Deodorant.

30-09-2021

Underarm sweat can be smelly, sticky and annoying. Antiperspirants contain aluminum salts to prevent sweat from reaching the skin’s surface, while aluminum-free deodorants help fight odor without blocking pores.

What happens when you switch to aluminum-free deodorant?

As your body continues to become accustomed to living without aluminum, its sweat and odor levels will self-regulate and begin to function normally. That means you’ll sweat slightly more than when you used antiperspirant, but considerably less than if you were to use nothing at all.

Is it bad to use deodorant with aluminum?

Antiperspirants contain aluminum to help you sweat less. Deodorants, for the most part, don’t use aluminum as an ingredient. Medical research shows that aluminum from antiperspirants can build up in your body. There’s no scientific evidence that directly links aluminum to cancers and other health conditions, though.

Is aluminum-free deodorant better?

The major difference between deodorant without aluminum and deodorant with aluminum is that the former blocks odor whereas the latter blocks sweat. Antiperspirants do not attack odor-causing bacteria, but instead use aluminum ingredients to alter the body’s natural perspiration process and block sweat from the start.

Why is aluminum bad for your armpits?

A few studies in recent years have theorized that aluminum-based antiperspirants may increase the risk for breast cancer. According to the authors of these studies, most breast cancers develop in the upper outer part of the breast — the area closest to the armpit, which is where antiperspirants are applied.

Is it worth switching to natural deodorant?

According to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, conventional antiperspirant deodorants are safe — so there’s no need to worry or switch to a natural deodorant on account of your overall health. A natural deodorant will help with armpit odor, but not sweat.

Why do you smell when switching to natural deodorant?

Why you smell while switching to natural deodorant “It’s the bacteria that grows on sweat that causes odor,” says Katie Sturino, founder of Megababe. (The brand’s aluminum-free deodorant, Rosy Pits, is one of my personal favorites.) It’s not that your all-natural roll-on isn’t working; it’s that your body is. Hard.

What aluminum does to your body?

Previous studies have linked frequent exposure to high levels of aluminum to neurotoxicity (adverse health effects on the central or peripheral nervous system or both), Alzheimer’s disease, and breast cancer.

Why does aluminum free deodorant not work?

“If something’s not working for you right away, it’s because it’s adjusted to the old way of doing things,” says Guzzo. Give a new product a few weeks to start fully working, but if it’s still leaving you stinking after that, it’s probably not the right formulation for your skin chemistry.

What is the safest underarm deodorant to use?

The Best Aluminum-Free Deodorants 1 Chemistry AHA Serum Deodorant. Kosas. 2 Zero Aluminum Pomegranate & Lemon Verbena Deodorant. Dove Beauty. No Essential Oils. 4 0% Aluminum Odor Protect Deodorant Stick. 5 The Deodorant. Fragrance-Free. 7 Secret Aluminum Free Deodorant Lavender. 8 Sunny Pits Daily Deodorant.

How do you detox your armpits?

Most armpit detoxes use a homemade mask of bentonite clay and apple cider vinegar. Some also include water to dilute the vinegar. Others use equal parts bentonite clay and coconut oil for a more soothing, hydrating mix that still has some antibacterial properties, thanks to the coconut oil.

Why do they put aluminum in deodorant?

Aluminum compounds are used extensively in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. In antiperspirants, aluminum salts are the ingredients that prevent sweating. The salts need to dissolve to block sweat from forming on the surface of your pores.

Is aluminum free deodorant natural?

On the other hand, natural deodorants are typically made without aluminum. They’re designed to keep you smelling fresh for hours with bacteria-sopping ingredients, including familiar favorites like baking soda.

What are the symptoms of aluminum toxicity?

Symptoms Confusion. Muscle weakness. Bone pain, deformities, and fractures. Seizures. Speech problems. Slow growth—in children.

Does aluminum cause dementia?

Current research provides no convincing evidence that exposure to trace elements of aluminum is connected to the development of dementia. Aluminum has been studied for over 40 years as a substance that might be linked to dementia.

Does aluminum make your armpits dark?

Body odour is a common problem in the summer and many deodorants contain aluminum salts that dry out the sweat but in turn clog the pores, often leading to darkening of the underarms.

How long do you smell after switching to natural deodorant?

Your body should have fully adjusted to natural deodorant. It can take up to 30 days for your body to regulate itself, though for some people the detox stage is shorter. You can now continue using natural deodorant every day to neutralise the smell of daily body odour.

What happens to your body when you switch to natural deodorant?

During the transition to using a natural deodorant, you may find that you get a reaction (itchy pits, or a rash). If you’ve been using conventional deodorant or antiperspirant for years, it can take 2-4 weeks to detox and release all of the aluminum in your pits that’s been preventing you from sweating.

How long should you detox your armpits before switching to natural deodorant?

Your body should have fully adjusted to natural deodorant. It can take up to 30 days for your body to regulate itself, though for some people the detox stage is shorter. You can now continue using natural deodorant every day to neutralize the smell of daily body odor.

Why do my armpits smell no matter what deodorant I use?

The odor can be caused by poor hygiene or not using the right products. Or there may be an underlying medical condition that needs to be treated. Using an over-the-counter (OTC) antiperspirant or deodorant (or a combination antiperspirant-deodorant) daily, after your shower, can help remedy armpit odor.

Do you have to detox before using natural deodorant?

Conventional deodorants filled with harmful chemicals clog up your pores and prevent your body from natural detoxing, a.k.a sweating. Years of using pore-clogging deodorant changes your body’s bacteria and will require a detox and a switch to a more natural solution.

Why is it better to use natural deodorant?

One of the benefits of natural deodorant is that it may even help your health. The natural ingredients make it less likely that you’ll have skin issues, but the lack of pore-blocking ingredients mean good bacteria works better and may prevent odor even when you have no deodorant on at all.

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Benefits of Aluminum-free Deodorant: Why You Should Go ...

13-07-2016 · Benefits of using an aluminum-free deodorant: 1. Avoid a potential breast cancer risk. While there’s a lack of no conclusive evidence that aluminum-based deodorants are directly linked to an increased risk of developing breast cancer, I’d rather be safe than sorry — especially if I don’t need the aluminum just to smell nice.

13-07-2016

Say No to AluminumOver the past few years I’ve heard many things about aluminum-based deodorants and antiperspirants that made me want to stop using them. That’s when I started experimenting with making my own aluminum-free, completely natural deodorant. Almost immediately after making the switch to what would later become Korina Natural Deodorant, I could feel an intense cleansing effect. In the first few days after switching, my armpits were especially sweaty. But it was only a few days until this subsided and my body had regulated itself. Of course, I still sweat sometimes, but I’m happy knowing that I’m no longer clogging my pores with a toxic ingredient — I was odor-free and aluminum-free and it felt great!

But what, exactly, are the benefits of aluminum-free deodorant? Let’s look at these benefits one at a time:

Benefits of using an aluminum-free deodorant:

1. Avoid a potential breast cancer risk

While there’s a lack of no conclusive evidence that aluminum-based deodorants are directly linked to an increased risk of developing breast cancer, I’d rather be safe than sorry — especially if I don’t need the aluminum just to smell nice. The jury is still out and more clinical tests need to be done to know the direct link between breast cancer and using aluminum deodorant.

Here’s more on aluminum deodorants and the potential link to breast cancer, from the American Cancer Society (emphasis mine):

“A study published in 2003 looked at responses from questionnaires sent out to women who had breast cancer. The researcher reported that women who were diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age said they used antiperspirant and started shaving their underarms earlier and shaved more often than women who were diagnosed when they were older. But the study design did not include a control group of women without breast cancer and has been criticized by experts as not relevant to the safety of these underarm hygiene practices.”

The few studies that have been conducted have been inconclusive. Still, to me it’s a simple decision to remove as many potentially risky chemicals from my daily regimen as possible.

2. Keep your underarm pores clear

Everyone knows that clear pores are better than clogged pores. The latter of course can lead to acne and other dermatological problems. But wait a minute, that’s exactly what aluminum-based antiperspirants are designed to do: clog your pores! Aluminum-based antiperspirants “work by forming a chemical reaction with the water in the sweat to form a physical plug… which is deposited in the sweat duct, producing a blockage in the areas that it’s applied,” David Pariser, MD, a professor of dermatology at Eastern Virginia Medical School, told WebMD in an interview.  Wow, who really feels comfortable clogging their pores with toxins on a daily basis? Meanwhile, aluminum-free deodorants don’t clog your pores at all — I’d call that a benefit!

3. Allow for healthy sweating

You underarm pores were designed to excrete sweat. In addition to removing excess heat, such as when you’re exercising, sweat helps rid the body of toxins, including those you consume and environmental pollution that attaches to your body. When you block your pores from sweating with aluminum-based antiperspirant, you aren’t doing yourself a favor. Just like you need to breathe, so do you pores.

4. Avoid irritation from aluminum

When my husband was fighting hyperhidrosis — a condition where your sweat glands are overactive, causing you to sweat much more than the average person — he was given prescription-strength anti-perspirant. The medication contained four times the amount of aluminum chloride found in standard over the counter anti-perspirant and caused him extreme pain in the hours following application. Considering the directions indicate this stuff needs to be applied at night, just before bedtime, you can imagine how uncomfortable he was, trying to get to sleep while his armpits were burning! Now, he uses Korina aluminum-free deodorant, and has no irritation and no sweat! (Read more in “Our Story.”)

5. Beat odor with natural ingredients 

When you have an effective natural deodorant that really works using natural essential oils and bacteria fighting ingredients, like coconut oil and beeswax, there’s no need to use aluminum to stay odor-free!

Think you’re ready to give aluminum-free deodorant a shot? Shop for Korina Natural Deodorant and see what you think. We’ll give you a full refund if you don’t love it!

Original Photo By Unknown, CC BY 3.0, Modified

6 Benefits of Aluminum-Free Deodorant

Deodorant itself isn’t dangerous, but the most common modern forms of deodorant, especially aluminum-based antiperspirants, are bad news. As a health-conscious consumer, you want — deserve! — to know what you’re putting on and in your body. Aluminum-free deodorant is the best choice for your skin, your wallet, and your health.

Aluminum-Free Deodorant

What’s your morning routine? You climb out of bed, brush your teeth, tame your hair, and get dressed. If you’re among the 95% of adults who wear deodorant, you also grab an antiperspirant and swipe it on your underarms.

Most of us consider deodorant an absolutely essential part of our morning routine. Honestly, leaving the house without deodorant can feel just as embarrassing as arriving to work without pants.

But there’s a major problem with this ritual. Deodorant itself isn’t dangerous, but the most common modern forms of deodorant, especially aluminum-based antiperspirants, are bad news. As a health-conscious consumer, you want — deserve! — to know what you’re putting on and in your body.

Aluminum-free deodorant is the best choice for your skin, your wallet, and your health.

The Problems With Normal Antiperspirant Deodorants

Take a look at your stick of deodorant. Chances are that it isn’t just labeled “deodorant,” but “antiperspirant and deodorant.” In other words, your deodorant doesn’t just deodorize the odor of your sweat; it stops you from sweating altogether.

That sounds like a great perk — no wet armpits on hot summer days! — but in reality it does your body a major disservice.

The Importance of Sweat

Sweating is more than just an inconvenience! It’s an essential body function. Two types of sweat glands exist all over your body. The first, eccrine glands, are spread over your forehead, arms, legs, and other common surfaces. Eccrine glands cool your body by producing the clear, salty, odorless sweat you’d expect to feel dripping down your face during a 10-mile run.

It’s the second type of sweat glands, the apocrine glands, that cause trouble. Apocrine glands are concentrated in areas of dense hair growth like your armpits, and instead of releasing clear, odorless sweat, they produce a thicker type of sweat into nearby hair follicles. The dark and moist environment of your underarms is a haven for bacteria. As your body temperature rises, those bacteria break down your sweat into substances like thioalcohols that carry rather unpleasant odors.

Despite the embarrassment of body odor, sweating is still a critical body function. In addition to lowering your core body temperature, sweating also flushes toxins from your body and purges your pores. Research even shows that some toxins are only released through sweat, not blood or urine. When your antiperspirant stops that sweating process, your body can’t purge toxins. Toxins stay trapped in your tissue and ultimately travel into your lymph nodes and trigger cellular damage.

Antiperspirant Deodorant Danger #1: Aluminum

When deodorants double as antiperspirants, they use aluminum compounds like aluminum chlorohydrate and aluminum zirconium to block sweat production in your underarms by plugging your sweat ducts. The FDA has approved a total of 18 aluminum-based ingredients for use in antiperspirant products, making it very easy for manufacturers to formulate and sell these dangerous products.

Unfortunately, research links aluminum to a range of diseases like Alzheimer’s and cancer.

Every mainstream antiperspirant company denies the link between aluminum and serious health conditions based on the assumption that skin creates an effective barrier to the absorption of aluminum. However, this assumption has very little data to support the claim. Instead, a growing body of research demonstrates the correlation between the use of aluminum deodorant and chronic health problems.

Aluminum Is Linked to Breast Cancer

The use of aluminum-based antiperspirants has caused aluminum to be measured at higher levels in breast structures than in the blood. Such potent levels of aluminum are believed to trigger gene instability in breast tissue that may promote the growth of tumors and cancer cells.

Maybe this helps to explain why more than 40,000 women in the United States are expected to die from breast cancer each year. Considering that breast cancer has become one of the two most commonly diagnosed cancers among American women, we can’t ignore the potential common denominator of aluminum-based antiperspirant deodorants.

Aluminum-Free Deodorant

Aluminum Is Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease

Aluminum is also closely linked to Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Research shows that aluminum functions as a neurotoxin in the following ways:

  • Sneaks into the brain using other transport mechanisms
  • Accumulates in selective tissues in the brain
  • Promotes inflammation in the brain
  • Causes cellular energy deficits
  • Triggers neurodegenerative hallmarks that define dementia

Given all of this information, why is aluminum in deodorant at all? Manufacturers have convinced us that sweating is bad, and aluminum makes it possible to keep our armpits dry all day long. However, now you know the truth: sweating is essential to your health, and using a natural deodorant without aluminum makes it possible to benefit from your natural sweating process without getting stinky.

Antiperspirant Deodorant Danger #2: Triclosan

Triclosan is an ingredient added to many common consumer products, especially personal care products like deodorant and toothpaste. It’s so ubiquitous that 75% of the US population is exposed to triclosan on a regular basis! Manufacturers that use triclosan in their products claim that triclosan reduces or prevents bacterial contamination, but research shows that the dangers of triclosan outweigh any potential benefits.

Even the FDA has stated that triclosan is “not generally recognized as safe” due to insufficient proof of its long-term benefits, and in 2016 it was banned from soap products. However, triclosan still lurks in high concentrations in most personal care products. This should concern all of us considering the results of triclosan research:

  • Levels of triclosan absorbed into human skin are comparable to the levels associated with mitochondrial dysfunction
  • Triclosan may nurture antibiotic-resistant bacteria
  • Triclosan can interfere with thyroid hormone production

Only a natural deodorant formulated without triclosan can protect your body from these serious health risks. This is especially important if you have young children about to hit puberty. Do you really want them slathering on an antiperspirant that has the potential to interfere with their hormone production and influence their health in the future?

Antiperspirant Deodorant Danger #3: It Makes You Smell Worse!

I know what you’re thinking — Uhh... what? My antiperspirant definitely doesn’t make my pits smell worse. But consider this — since normal antiperspirant deodorants use antimicrobial substances to kill bacteria and plug sweat glands, they disrupt the natural bacteria living in your underarms.

Sure, those natural bacteria cause your armpits to smell, but recent research suggests that interrupting armpit bacteria could make odors worse in the long run. As you kill bacteria and block sweat, you directly change the habitat of your armpit bacteria, potentially causing worse, even smellier bacteria to appear in response. (And nobody wants that.)

Studies have found that antiperspirants kill off less potent bacteria, which then allows aggressive and odor-intensive bacteria to dominate in their place. This creates a vicious circle of dependency on the products that cause your stink problem in the first place!

There’s only one logical solution: detoxify your sweat glands with natural deodorant. New skin cells take about one month to develop, so don’t be alarmed if it takes that long for all of your extra-smelly sweat and bacteria to work their way out of your body. If you can survive those few weeks, you’ll be able to enjoy the rest of your life using safe and effective natural deodorant.

The Six Benefits of Aluminum-Free Deodorant

By choosing a deodorant without aluminum, you can protect yourself from the many dangers of traditional antiperspirants and improve your armpit health. Consider these six incredible benefits of using a natural aluminum-free deodorant.

Natural Deodorant Ingredients Are Safe

I probably don’t need to remind you that aluminum, triclosan, and other common antiperspirant deodorant ingredients are bad news. Using a deodorant without aluminum automatically protects your body from the threats of Alzheimer’s disease, breast cancer, hormone disruption, and so much more.

Look for a natural deodorant with ingredients that enhance your health, like hemp seed oil, essential oils, activated charcoal, and coconut oil.

Cultivates Your Natural Biome

Your personal microbiome ecosystem is a vital part of your overall health. The microbiome of your armpits is created by the trillions of bacteria and other microorganisms that coexist peacefully. Unlike antiperspirants that disrupt your natural microbiome with toxins and chemicals that kill bacteria, a natural aluminum-free deodorant helps your microbiome thrive and supports the balance of healthy bacteria.

This is important because happy, healthy bacteria smell much better than angry and aggressive bacteria pushed out of balance. When you choose a natural deodorant that enhances your natural biome, you can sweat healthy and smell fresh.

Aluminum-Free Deodorant

Saves Some Money

You might not think that purchasing an aluminum-free natural deodorant can save you money, but it’s true. Most normal antiperspirants require 9 or 10 swipes per armpit to keep you dry and odorless, and you might even need to reapply halfway through the day. That means you go through a whole lot of deodorant each week and probably need to restock on a monthly basis.

A natural aluminum-free deodorant works differently. You only need 2 or 3 swipes per side to enjoy the best results and smell fresh all day. Why? The best natural deodorants only contain the active ingredients that work with your body to reduce odor, helping one single deodorant stick last two to three times longer!

Even if your natural deodorant does cost a few dollars more than your average commercial brand, you ultimately save money while also investing in your health and avoiding the consequences of toxic ingredients. Sounds like a win-win to me.

Helps the Environment

Hey, it’s not just your body that you care about; it’s the environment as well! Most of the best all-natural deodorants use packaging that support sustainability with renewable sources and recyclable materials. Cardboard containers in particular demonstrate a natural deodorant brand’s desire to maintain a smaller carbon footprint.

Becomes More Effective Over Time

Most people weighing the decision to switch to a natural aluminum-free deodorant are concerned about the efficiency of natural deodorant. If you’re one of them, you’ll be surprised to learn that natural deodorant is more effective than standard aluminum-based deodorant, as long as you give your body a few weeks to adjust.

When you start transitioning to natural deodorant, your pores and cells need a few weeks to detox aluminum, parabens, and other common chemicals lurking in your old deodorant. It takes time and patience, but it’s completely worth it in the end to enjoy a deodorant that delivers results without harming your health.

As your natural deodorant recalibrates your armpit biome, cultivates healthy bacteria, and enhances your overall wellness, you’ll notice the odor of your natural sweat diminish. The Stick Up natural deodorant even contains activated charcoal to help cleanse tissues and absorb 1,000 times its own weight in moisture! This absorbent shield between your skin and your shirt keeps your feeling drier, longer.

Natural Ingredients Can Improve Your Skin

You might like to flaunt your legs or your smile, but your armpits? Not so much. After slathering toxic deodorant on your armpits for the last few decades, your skin under there might be dry, damaged, or covered in razor burn.

Believe it or not, the nourishing ingredients in all-natural deodorant can improve the quality of your skin and help you feel a bit less dread when raising your arm to wave hello or finish a bench press. Ingredients like essential oils, hemp seed oil, coconut oil, and plant extracts will kill bacteria hiding in your armpits and keep your skin strong, healthy, and toxin-free.

Ingredients to Look for in Your Deodorant

Keep in mind that the term “natural” isn’t regulated by the FDA, so it’s easy for companies to claim their products are “natural,” even if they’re anything but. This makes finding the best natural deodorant tricky, so look for the following ingredients on the label.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most essential yet underrated nutrients out there. It’s needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions, which means that magnesium deficiency causes a wide range of serious health problems. Believe it or not, low magnesium levels may even cause your sweat to smell worse.

By selecting a natural deodorant that contains magnesium, you effortlessly supplement your body’s magnesium, which helps fight pit odor internally. The more you use it, the better your body can fight internal odor. Applying magnesium-based deodorant directly on your pits also fights odor externally by killing bad bacteria, all without the risks involved with aluminum and other toxic ingredients!

Zinc Oxide

Zinc oxide is a mineral that’s popular as an alternative to triclosan and baking soda in natural products like sunscreen, diaper cream, and shampoo. It works externally by converting the short fatty acids that produce odor-creating bacteria into odorless zinc salts. This safely creates a protective barrier on the skin and reduces odor-causing bacteria by minimizing the growth of new bacteria.

Aluminum-Free Deodorant

Kaolin and Bentonite Clay

Kaolin clay is a very gentle clay with absorptive properties that pull impurities from the skin without over-drying. It even stimulates circulation to enhance healing of the skin. A natural deodorant containing kaolin clay will leave your armpits feeling silky smooth.

Bentonite clay is another awesome ingredient to find in your deodorant. Bentonite clay is a soft clay composed of aged volcanic ash. Like most powerful natural remedies, bentonite clay has been used since ancient times to protect the body from disease and injury. Several native cultures living in Central Africa, Australia, and the Andes rely on bentonite clay to address health concerns and detoxify the body.

More than anything else, the impressive power of bentonite clay comes from its negatively charged molecules. Those molecules attract positively-charged toxins and heavy metals. This makes it possible for bentonite clay to latch on to dangerous toxins and draw and push them out of the body.

This ingredient does more than detoxify, too! It also functions as a barrier on the skin by preventing toxic compounds from entering while moisturizing the affected skin.

Activated Charcoal

Activated charcoal is an exciting ingredient to find in your deodorant! This porous natural substance acts like a filter to absorb anything toxic in your body. Its negative charge immediately attracts positively charged molecules like toxins and gases.

Hemp Seed

Hemp seed is the newest ingredient in my Stick Up natural deodorant, and I’m pretty excited to share it! Hemp seeds are the seeds of Cannabis sativa, the hemp plant. The powerful fatty acids found in hemp seeds can enhance the immune response of your body and relieve dry, itchy skin. It even fights odor to keep you smelling lovely!

The Bottom Line

Why risk your health with aluminum-based deodorants, when natural aluminum-free deodorants offer so many benefits? The right combination of natural and super effective ingredients creates the results you want without the threats posed by toxic ingredients. I sweat healthy — and now you can too.

Primal Life Organics offers a line of hand-crafted natural, aluminum-free deodorants that fight stink, inflammation, and bacteria to give you the freshest pits ever. Don’t let your commercial deodorant get the best of you!

Resources:

1. https://www.livescience.com/26351-no-smell-gene-wear-deodorant.html2. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2417043. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/210577824. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/cfrsearch.cfm?fr=350.105. https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(04)00694-1/fulltext6. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S01620134130016087. https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/statistics8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/211570189. https://universityhealthnews.com/daily/memory/aluminum-linked-to-alzheimers-disease/10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2918246411. https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/InformationbyDrugClass/ucm445063.htm12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6126357/13. https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm205999.htm14. https://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2014/08/antiperspirants_alter        _your_armpit_bacteria_and_could_actually_make_you_smell_worse.html15. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/09e9/212f610dcda65cd5ef54e92a711cea84372e.pdf

16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5632318/

Deodorants With or Without Aluminum - Why Choose Aluminum ...

The aluminum in deodorants is often mentioned among substances to avoid in skin care products and switching to an aluminum-free deodorant is a common step when going green in your skin care routine. The reason is claims that aluminum cause breast cancer. There are, however, many scientists that disagree and consider it an urban myth. That there are no connections whatsoever …

Deodorant with or without aluminium?

The aluminum in deodorants is often mentioned among substances to avoid in skin care products and switching to an aluminum-free deodorant is a common step when going green in your skin care routine. The reason is claims that aluminum cause breast cancer. There are, however, many scientists that disagree and consider it an urban myth. That there are no connections whatsoever between deodorant use and breast cancer. This was also the conclusion reached by the EC's Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) in 2014 when they found that none of the studies done so far on the subject deodorants and breast cancer were performed according to good laboratory practice and therefore impossible to draw conclusions from [1]. So what is the truth? Are there any scientific proofs behind these claims? We have gone through the scientific reports in question as well as looked at the newer studies published after 2014. Even if we in many cases agree with the EC report, we find some of the new results that have emerged on the subject clearly distressing. Even if there are no clear proofs, on the basis of current data,  it is hard to state that the aluminum in deodorants are completely harmless and it might be a good idea to play it safe and avoid aluminum deodorants.

Why These Suspicions About Underarm Cosmetics as a Cause of Breast Cancer?

The first sign that something is wrong when it comes to deodorants is that a majority of all breast cancer cases starts in the upper, outer quadrant of the breast. We are talking figures varying from 35-60% from report to report, while the other quadrants are responsible for about 5-15% of the cases. This is extremely disturbing figures and there are studies that try to explain this with that in the upper, outer region of the breast there is more tissue of the type that is involved in breast cancer [2]. The problem with this explanation is that the number of breast cancer cases starting in the upper, outer quadrant has increased since the late 1970s [3]. Maybe not linearly as the authors of the report try to argue but the numbers do show a clear rise between the 1970s and the 1990s, which then appears to stagnate until the present day. This among the cases reported in Scotland, England and Wales. Most marked is the increase among the youngest women, those diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 50. A more recent study confirms the increase in England but fails to see as clear a trend in corresponding American data [4].

Rise in Breast Cancer Cases Worldwide

Breast cancer is more common in the West than the rest of the world and has doubled in the number of cases per 100,000 people since the 1970s and almost tripled since 1940s [4,5]. Known risk factors are genetic predisposition, estrogen treatments, alcohol consumption, BMI and age at the first pregnancy. About half of the cases cannot be linked to any known risk factor why there is a search for other lifestyle factors.

Epidemiological Studies With Contradictory Results

While deodorants only disguise bad odors, antiperspirants inhibit transpiration. Virtually all antiperspirants contain aluminum salts, most commonly aluminum chlorohydrate or aluminum chloride. The mechanism for how aluminum inhibits transpiration is not perfectly clear but the belief is that it forms a plug that blocks the sweet ducts. So far, four studies have tried to see a connection between the use of deodorants / antiperspirants and breast cancer [5-8]. The two earliest, one from the US and one from Iraq, simply looked at how many breast cancer patients used antiperspirants or deodorants compared to a control group. Both these studies failed to see any increased risk for breast cancer from use of underarm cosmetics [6,8]. Another study from 2003 focused instead on the usage pattern of antiperspirants, deodorants as well as underarm shaving in breast cancer patients and compared with the patients age at diagnosis [5]. The patients were divided into four groups based on how often they used antiperspirants or deodorants where the Max-group corresponded to use 2-5 times/week combined with shaving at least 3 times/week. The study saw a gradual decrease of the age at diagnosis with increased use of antiperspirants. Between the Max-group and the Non-group, i.e. no antiperspirant, no shaving, the difference was astounding, all of 15 years differed between the group's average age when breast cancer was diagnosed. In addition, when they looked only at the Max-group, they could within the group see a difference of 19 years between those who started to use antiperspirants before the age of 16 and those who started later in life. A very recent study has looked more closely at the frequency of antiperspirant use and also measured the concentration of aluminum in breast tissue in breast cancer patients and compared with age matched controls. [6]. This study saw a clear increased risk from use of antiperspirants several times a day before the age of 30. After compensation for other risk factors was the increased risk from use of antiperspirants almost 4 times. The amount of aluminum in breast tissue was significantly linked to the frequency of antiperspirant use. Measurement of aluminum showed significantly more aluminum in the breast tissue of the patients compared with the controls. Additionally could the scientist see a significantly increased amount of aluminum in the patients whose tumors were localized to the in the upper, outer quadrant compared to patients with tumors in other quadrants.

Uptake of Aluminum Through the Skin

Unlike other metals such as iron, copper, zinc, manganese and cobalt, aluminum is not a trace element and is not necessary for the body. On the other hand, aluminum is not a heavy metal either. Nonetheless, many studies indicate that aluminum is toxic for us and point to a link between aluminum and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's [9,10].

The substances in an antiperspirant are not rinsed away in the same way as the content in shampoo and shower gel but stays on the skin until your next shower. Therefore it constitutes a continuous exposure. What's more, the habit to shave just before applying antiperspirants causes small nicks and abrasions, which increases the uptake of the substances in the antiperspirant.

There seems to be a common misconception that Aluminum chlorohydrate is too big a molecule to be taken up by the skin. However, aluminum chlorohydrate is highly soluble in water, in fact more soluble than table salt (50g versus 36g/100 ml at room temperature) meaning that it disperses into free ions in water. It has been shown that aluminum is taken up through the skin [11-13]. The uptake was higher in damaged skin shown by so-called tape stripping, a method where the outmost layers of cells are removed with the help of a tape [11]. The same study also showed that the aluminum applied as an aerosol was more efficiently taken up than the aluminum in roll-on or stick deodorants.

Aluminum has been found in breast tissue [14] as well as breast milk [15]. There are also some studies that indicate that the amount of aluminum is higher in cancerous breast tissue than in non-cancerous [16,17]. Aluminum concentrations many times higher than in blood sera has been measured in cystic fluid in patients with benign breast cysts [15]. Unfortunately, no attempts were made to correlate this result with usage patterns of aluminum antiperspirants. Yet another study suggests increased amounts of aluminum in breast nipple fluid in breast cancer patients but the study was performed on a very small group of women (18 cancer patients and 16 controls), which makes it difficult to draw any strong conclusions [18].

One should, however, bear in mind that we also take up aluminum via the food and the presence of aluminum in breast tissue and breast milk not necessarily is a result of aluminum containing antiperspirants.

Aluminum and Estrogenic Effects

Dr. Philippa Darbre is one of the scientists who has almost relentlessly pursued the question of a link between aluminum and breast cancer and she has put up with a great deal of criticism from colleagues for her research. Dr. Darbre has with her research tried to show that aluminum chloride och aluminum chlorohydrate have a direct hormone disrupting effect on the estrogen receptor [19]. The study is, however, badly substantiated and based on only three single experiments, which she does not repeat to exclude chance. The concentrations of aluminum used to show competition with estrogen for its receptor were sky high and completely unreasonable in the context. We are talking about amounts 2,5-10 million times higher than estrogen. The same goes for the attempt to show effects on growth of breast cancer cells. Estrogen normally has a growth stimulating effect on breast cancer cells but the high doses of aluminum used in the experiment only causes the cells to grow slower than normal. Finally, Dr. Darbre makes an attempt to show that aluminum can affect the estrogen effect, i.e. she uses a system where positive binding to the estrogen receptor (binding and activation) results in a measurable effect. In the study estrogen is compared with 10,000 times higher doses of aluminum. She then observes an increased effect with aluminum by its own and a strong effect of estrogen and aluminum together. The problem is the complete lack of controls. Normally this type of study should be verified in the absence of the receptor to rule out that the measured effect is not caused in some other way, i.e. is an artifact. Furthermore, if the estrogen effect was real, the treatment of breast cancer cells with aluminum should have caused a growth stimulation.

These results do not eliminate the possibility of aluminum having a causal effect on breast cancer, they only suggest it is not very likely to occur via the estrogen receptor. 

Aluminum and Breast Cancer

Aluminum is not directly mutagenic. Attempts to show that aluminum can directly cause mutations have failed. [20]. Regardless, presence of aluminum seems to result in increased DNA damage in the form of double strand breaks [20]. A serious type of damage to DNA  that is particularly difficult to repair correctly since both the strands are broken and there is no longer any template to follow. There is also a study that shows that aluminum seems to affect normal cells to display cells a more oncogenic behavior [20]. Long-term treatment of breast cells with aluminum chlorohydrate and aluminum chloride resulted in a loss of contact inhibition and anchor-independent growth, two typical attributes for oncogenic cells. Yet another long-term study indicated that aluminum increased the migration of the cells and resulted in a tendency for invasive behavior, in other words, their propensity to spread and metastasize [21]. These last experiments on cell migration and invasion were not repeated though and one should be careful not to draw to strong conclusions based on them.


A study from the US on a small group of breast cancer patients showed increased genetic instability in the outer region of the breast in non-carcinogenous tissue [22]. No difference could be seen between the upper and lower region though. Genetic instability can, of course, be caused by various reasons but one possibility is impaired repair of DNA damage. A very recent study has found a connection between a protein extremely important for correct repair of  DNA damage, namely BRCA1, whose gene is also called the breast cancer gene. BRCA1 is part of a complex that repairs DNA double strand breaks. Mutations that result in loss of function of BRCA1 protein increase the risk for developing breast cancer at some point in your life to 80%. The study in question found that treatment of cells with either aluminum chlorohydrate or aluminum chloride dramatically decreased the amount of BRCA1 proteins in the cells [23]. However, the study is only done on cells in a laboratory and the results need to be verified on human tissue, preferably in correlation with aluminum deodorant use. But if the connection between aluminum and BRCA1 holds true, it is extremely serious and would definitely constitute a mechanism for how aluminum in deodorants can increase the risk for breast cancer.

Avoid Aluminum in Deodorants

Taken together, the recent scientific reports indicate that aluminum in deodorants is not completely harmless. Even if the outcome so far not inconclusively points to aluminum as a risk factor in breast cancer are the results distressing and clearly question the general opinion that aluminum is safe.This is particularly alarming considering the widespread use of aluminum deodorants in the West. So even if aluminum is not yet proven toxic it is better to take no chances and to completely avoid deodorants containing either aluminum chloride or aluminum chlorohydrate, at least until proven otherwise.

Crystal Deodorants – To Avoid or Not?

Potassium alum alternatively Ammonium alum (Chemically; Potassium aluminum sulfate; KAl(SO4)2 or Ammonium aluminum sulfate; NH4)Al(SO4)2) are common in many alternative, natural deodorants, sometimes marketed as aluminum-free, which, of course, is incorrect.
Alum is a naturally available salt possessing antibacterial, constringent and blood-stopping properties and has traditionally been used as a deodorant in various parts of the world. The big difference between deodorants containing alum compared with aluminum chloride or aluminum chlorohydrate is that alum has antibacterial but no antiperspirant properties or at least is a much weaker antiperspirant than the other two salts. Possibly this is due to a lesser uptake of alum compared with the other two salts but since the mechanism behind the antiperspirant effect aluminum salts is not completely understood it is difficult to say if this the case. Unfortunately none of the studies that have looked at uptake of aluminum chloride and aluminum chlorohydrate included alum in the tests and at present there are no physiological studies done on this salt. The solubility in water at room temperature is about 3.5 times less for alum in comparison to the other aluminum salts, which could entail that the uptake through the skin is lower but would hardly prevent it from being taken up at all. Considering that the increased risk for breast cancer development was only seen at excessive use of antiperspirants it may be a question of concentration. Until this is fully investigated we would like to urge for caution regarding crystal deodorants and natural deodorants containing potassium alum or ammonium alum, especially among those that already are at higher risk for other reasons, for example has a family history of breast cancer or are using estrogen supplements. In addition, teenagers, pregnant women and nursing mothers would also be wise to avoid crystal deodorants.

References

  1. Lee, A.H., Why is carcinoma of the breast more frequent in the upper outer quadrant? A case series based on needle core biopsy diagnoses. Breast, 2005. 14(2): 151-2.
  2. Darbre, P.D., Recorded quadrant incidence of female breast cancer in Great Britain suggests a disproportionate increase in the upper outer quadrant of the breast. Anticancer Res, 2005. 25(3c): 2543-50.
  3. Bright, C.J. et al., Comparison of quadrant-specific breast cancer incidence trends in the United States and England between 1975 and 2013. Cancer Epidemiol, 2016. 44: 186-194.
  4. McGrath, K.G., An earlier age of breast cancer diagnosis related to more frequent use of antiperspirants/deodorants and underarm shaving. Eur J Cancer Prev, 2003. 12(6): 479-85.
  5. Fakri, S. et al., Antiperspirant use as a risk factor for breast cancer in Iraq. East Mediterr Health J, 2006. 12(3-4): 478-82.
  6. Linhart, C. et al., Use of Underarm Cosmetic Products in Relation to Risk of Breast Cancer: A Case-Control Study. EBioMedicine, 2017. 21: 79-85.
  7. Mirick, D.K. et al., Antiperspirant use and the risk of breast cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst, 2002. 94(20): 1578-80.
  8. Maya, S. et al., Multifaceted effects of aluminum in neurodegenerative diseases: A review. Biomed Pharmacother, 2016. 83: 746-754.
  9. Colomina, M.T. and Peris-Sampedro, F., Aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease. Adv Neurobiol, 2017. 18: 183-197.
  10. Pineau, A. et al., In vitro study of percutaneous absorption of aluminum from antiperspirants through human skin in the Franz diffusion cell. J Inorg Biochem, 2012. 110: 21-6.
  11. Flarend, R. et al., A preliminary study of the dermal absorption of aluminum from antiperspirants using aluminum-26. Food Chem Toxicol, 2001. 39(2): 163-8.
  12. Anane, R. et al., Bioaccumulation of water soluble aluminum chloride in the hippocampus after transdermal uptake in mice. Arch Toxicol, 1995. 69(8): 568-71.
  13. Exley, C. et al., Aluminum in human breast tissue. J Inorg Biochem, 2007. 101(9): 1344-6.
  14. Mannello, F. et al., Concentration of Aluminum in breast cyst fluids collected from women affected by gross cystic breast disease. J Appl Toxicol, 2009. 29(1): 1-6.
  15. Mulay, I.L. et al., Trace-metal analyais of cancerous and noncancerous human tissues. J Natl Cancer Inst, 1971. 47(1): 1-13.
  16. Ng, K.H. et al., Elevated trace element concentrations in malignant breast tissues. Br J Radiol, 1997. 70(832): 375-82.
  17. Mannello, F. et al., Analysis of aluminum content and iron homeostasis in nipple aspirate fluids from healthy women and breast cancer-affected patients. J Appl Toxicol, 2011. 31(3): 262-9.
  18. Darbre, P.D., Aluminum, antiperspirants and breast cancer. J Inorg Biochem, 2005. 99(9): 1912-9.
  19. Sappino, A.P. et al., Aluminum chloride promotes anchorage-independent growth in human mammary epithelial cells. J Appl Toxicol, 2012. 32(3): 233-43.
  20. Darbre, P.D. et al., Effect of aluminum on migratory and invasive properties of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in culture. J Inorg Biochem, 2013. 128: 245-9.
  21. Ellsworth, D.L. et al., Outer breast quadrants demonstrate increased levels of genomic instability. Ann Surg Oncol, 2004. 11(9): 861-8.
  22. Farasani, A. and Darbre, P.D., Effects of aluminum chloride and aluminum chlorohydrate on DNA repair in MCF10A immortalised non-transformed human breast epithelial cells. J Inorg Biochem, 2015. 152: 186-9.

Read more about Toxins in Skin Care

Why Aluminum Free Deodorant

Aluminum free deodorants, like Love Beauty and Planet plant-based, aluminum free deodorant for women, attacks these odor-causing bacteria that interact with sweat protein, ultimately getting rid of underarm odor. Antiperspirants do not attack odor-causing bacteria, but instead use aluminum ingredients to alter the body’s natural perspiration process and block sweat from the start.

2. flexible usage

There are certain situations when using a deodorant instead of an antiperspirant makes the most sense. Aluminum free deodorant is more flexible in terms of where and when to apply it. As long as your underarms are towel-dried after your shower, you can feel free to apply your deodorant. There are a bit more rules when it comes to antiperspirant deodorants with aluminum. Antiperspirants work by having their aluminum salts create a gel layer on your underarms that block sweat from coming in. But, this process takes some time to kick in, and it is generally recommended that you should only use antiperspirants at night if you’re looking for the best results. If you don’t allow time during sleep when your sweat glands are at rest for the aluminum to block sweat, the antiperspirant won’t really work. If you prefer a morning shower, stick to aluminum free deodorant!

3. ingredient-forward

Antiperspirants use aluminum salts to block your apocrine sweat glands from stimulating underarm sweat. Aluminum free deodorants, as these are focused on blocking odor versus blocking sweat, contain antibacterial ingredients to kill those odor-causing bacteria that live off your sweat protein. Antibacterial ingredients are often plant-based ingredients, like coconut oil and cornstarch. So if you are looking for natural options with real, plant-based ingredients, deodorant without aluminum are the most fitting choice. 

The Essential Guide: Switching to An Aluminum-Free Deodorant

While deodorant isn’t always top of mind, many of us rely on it to get us through our busy days, odor-free. It can be confusing to navigate which product to use, but there are a number of reasons why you may want to consider using a natural deodorant.

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Are you considering trying a natural deodorant for the first time? Or maybe you’ve tried one or two (or seven) and none of them have worked? Before making the switch, it’s helpful to understand what happens when you stop using antiperspirant and start using an aluminum-free deodorant.

Here are the things you need to know about making the switch:

How does antiperspirant work?
In order to understand what it takes to adjust to an aluminum-free deodorant, you need to understand how antiperspirant works.

Antiperspirant contains aluminum to help prevent perspiration (or sweating). The aluminum disrupts your body's natural sweating process by absorbing into your sweat duct and forming a temporary gel-like plug that prevents sweat from coming out.

What happens when you switch to aluminum-free deodorant?
You might hear a lot of people say they have to “detox” their armpits when they switch to a natural deodorant. Many of our customers do experience an adjustment period when they switch. During this period, many of them report they smell and / or sweat more than usual. The good news is that this is a temporary inconvenience for the vast majority of people we’ve heard from.

How long does it take to adjust?
It depends! For most people who report experiencing an adjustment period, it can be anywhere from 2-4 weeks. And then there are some lucky folks that adjust right away! The moral of the story is to stick it out, at least for one month to see if it will work for you.

How much more will I sweat with aluminum-free deodorant?
Most aluminum-free deodorants contain powders to help absorb wetness - Each & Every contains tapioca starch to help with wetness on the surface of the skin, and we think it does a pretty good job! Some of our customers also note that they sweat less after the adjustment period.

With that said, these powders are not going to have the same effect as aluminum, so you will likely sweat more. For some of our customers, this is occasional and only occurs when it’s hot and humid. Others notice more perspiration daily. And others report that Each & Every keeps them dry pretty much all the time! Getting used to sweat can take some time, but it’s helpful to remember that sweating is a natural process and is beneficial in regulating your body temperature.

Tips for getting through the adjustment period:
We asked some of our VIPs what tips they have for getting through the adjustment period. And here’s what they had to say:

  1. Wear breathable fabrics until your body adjusts. Go for natural fabrics such as cotton, linen, bamboo, hemp, and wool. Avoid synthetic fabrics, such as polyester, which don’t absorb sweat and can in turn cause more odor-causing bacteria.
  2. Apply more often in the first 2-4 weeks. Applying at night can help reduce odor-causing bacteria. Additionally, a travel size or mini deodorant with you in your purse so you can touch up throughout the day if you notice odor. Our 4 piece and 8 piece mini discovery sets are a lifesaver!
  3. Use a good antibacterial soap in the shower to help with the odor causing bacteria. Make sure to dry your underarms well after getting out of the shower, as excess moisture can make odor worse.
  4. Take hot baths or spend some time running hot water on your underarms in the shower to help open your pores.
  5. Choose a cooler, less humid time of the year to make the switch. Fall, Winter and Spring are all great times to switch!
  6. Stay hydrated during the adjustment period. Drinking enough water is important, especially since you may be sweating more in the first few weeks.
  7. Be patient! Give it at least a month to ensure your body has had enough time to adjust.

Why choose Each & Every?
There are a ton of natural deodorants on the market, so it can be daunting and confusing to determine which you should choose. We recommend regardless of what you choose that you do research, because there are no regulations around claiming a product is “clean”, and some of the aluminum-free deodorants on the market still contain ingredients that aren’t so natural. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) Skin Deep Database is a great resource while you’re researching brands and ingredients.

Here are a few things that differentiate Each & Every from the others on the market.

  1. EWG Verified - We are one of a select few to be verified by the EWG. This means its free of EWG’s chemicals of concern and meets their strictest standards for health. It means full transparency for both ingredients and manufacturing standards.
  2. Designed with sensitive skin in mind - We leave out ingredients that can cause irritation, such as baking soda and synthetic fragrances.
  3. Easy, smooth application - Many other deodorants on the market are grainy and tough to apply - kind of like rubbing a dry bar of soap on your skin! But E&E has a smooth, creamy and luxe feel, making it easy to apply and preventing any irritation of tugging.
  4. Natural Fragrance - Our deodorants are scented with essential oils and absolutely no synthetic or engineered fragrances. We source these from all over the world depending on the type of oil - for example, French lavender oil, citrus oils from Italy, and pine from Canada - ensuring we use only top quality oils in our deodorants.
  5. No stains - Our deodorant goes on clear, on every skin tone. Just apply, wait a few seconds for it to dry, and get dressed. No white marks, no yellow stains, and no dark pits.
  6. Cruelty-free and vegan - E&E is certified vegan and cruelty-free. We don’t use any animal byproducts (such as beeswax) and we do absolutely NO animal testing.

You can shop our best sellers below. And if you’ve given E&E a try for a month and it’s not working for you, rest assured that we have a money-back guarantee. You can contact us at [email protected]

USD .00 ( VALUE)
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2.5 oz (70g)

Our Top Three Scents
Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver and Coconut & Lime

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0.5 oz (14g)

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Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver, Coconut & Lime, Rose & Vanilla, Cedar & Vanilla, Cannabis & Green Tea, Cardamom & Ginger, Black Spruce & Fir, Juniper & Mint, Sandalwood & Black Pepper, Geranium & Snow Mushroom, Unscented & Fragrance Free

USD .00 ( VALUE)
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

Choose Any Three Scents
Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver, Coconut & Lime, Rose & Vanilla, Cedar & Vanilla, Cannabis & Green Tea, Cardamom & Ginger, Geranium & Snow Mushroom, Unscented & Fragrance Free

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Deodorant

0.5 oz (14g)

Try Them All
Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver, Coconut & Lime, Rose & Vanilla, Cedar & Vanilla, Cannabis & Green Tea, Cardamom & Ginger, Unscented & Fragrance Free

USD .00
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2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00 ( VALUE)
Deodorant
1.7 oz (48.19g)

8 Count Variety
Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver, Coconut & Lime, Rose & Vanilla, Cedar & Vanilla, Cannabis & Green Tea, Cardamom & Ginger, Unscented & Fragrance Free

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Lavender & Lemon
Deodorant
2.5 oz (14g)

Lavender
Solid Shampoo Bar
3.5 oz (100g)

USD .00 ( VALUE)
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

Our Top Three Scents
Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver and Coconut & Lime

USD .00
Deodorant

0.5 oz (14g)

Choose Any Four Scents
Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver, Coconut & Lime, Rose & Vanilla, Cedar & Vanilla, Cannabis & Green Tea, Cardamom & Ginger, Black Spruce & Fir, Juniper & Mint, Sandalwood & Black Pepper, Geranium & Snow Mushroom, Unscented & Fragrance Free

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant
2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant

2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant

2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant

2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant

2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant

2.5 oz (70g)

USD .00
Deodorant

0.5 oz (45.5g)

Try Them All
Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver, Coconut & Lime, Rose & Vanilla, Cedar & Vanilla, Cannabis & Green Tea, Cardamom & Ginger, Unscented & Fragrance Free

USD .00 ( VALUE)
Deodorant

1.7 oz (48.19g)

8 Count Variety
Lavender & Lemon, Citrus & Vetiver, Coconut & Lime, Rose & Vanilla, Cedar & Vanilla, Cannabis & Green Tea, Cardamom & Ginger, Unscented & Fragrance Free

USD .00 ( VALUE)

Lavender & Lemon
Deodorant
2.5 oz (14g)

Lavender
Solid Shampoo Bar
3.5 oz (100g) 

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Here's the Deal With Aluminum-Free Deodorant (and Why You ...

04-02-2019 · Why are aluminum based deodorants bad for us? Lisa Feb 16, 2019 at 10:37 am . Would like to see articles that substantiate any claims as well. jeanw6179 Feb 16, 2019 at 4:55 am . I am allergic to the aluminum in deodorant. I appreciate hearing about new, aluminum-free deodorants. Jennifer Feb 15, 2019 at 7:18 pm . Aluminum based antiperspirants are not harmful. Years ago people unscientificly ...

04-02-2019
Feature Image by Love Beauty and Planet

Aluminum-free deodorant has been on the market for years, but it’s picked up steam as people are more conscious of the products they’re putting both in and on their bodies.

So, why the switch? Well, for starters, aluminum-free deodorants only include the ingredients you need to smell good. Plus, when you shop Love Beauty and Planet, you can rest assured that you’re also giving a little love to the planet.

Not convinced? Here are four reasons why you should use aluminum-free deodorant.

Thoughtful ingredients
Aluminum-free deodorant clearly makes mindful choices when it comes to its ingredients list. Love Beauty and Planet’s deodorants, for example, are infused with organic coconut oil and made with plant-based deodorizers, which help to keep you smelling fresh for 24 hours. Not to mention, it’s vegan, not tested on animals, and free of parabens and alcohol.

Recycled packaging
Not only are you giving your body a treat when you use Love Beauty and Planet’s deodorants, but you’re also making an eco-conscious choice. The brand’s aluminum-free deodorants are fully recyclable and the canisters are made from 43 percent recycled materials to align with its brand mission to reduce waste and give a little love back to the planet.

Carbon conscious mission
Love Beauty and Planet’s goal is to reduce their carbon footprint through new technologies and formats. The brand also has a carbon tax fund ( per carbon ton goes into the fund) that goes to support third-party programs and serves as an incentive to help reduce carbon emissions.

Sensible scents
We’re obsessed with the Love Beauty and Planet Coconut & Ylang Ylang Deodorant Stick because it is infused with ylang ylang extract and delivers a fresh yet rich floral, jasmine-like scent with overtones of fruit and spice.

xx, The FabFitFun Team

About Author

3 Tips for Switching to Aluminum-Free Deodorant

The research is ongoing, but it raises enough questions that making the switch to a natural or aluminum-free deodorant makes sense to a lot of people. On the other hand, making this switch can bring up a whole bunch of concerns, like worries about smelling weird, dripping sweat constantly or developing creepy underarm rashes.

aluminum free deodorant best aluminum free deodorant

Let’s face it, it’s always easier to keep doing things the exact same way than it is to make a change — even if you know that the new routine is better for you (hello, possible links between aluminum and health risks). The research is ongoing, but it raises enough questions that making the switch to a natural or aluminum-free deodorant makes sense to a lot of people. On the other hand, making this switch can bring up a whole bunch of concerns, like worries about smelling weird, dripping sweat constantly or developing creepy underarm rashes.

But it’s hard to ignore a growing pile of research that suggests aluminum-free deodorants are a healthier, safer way to go. When you’re ready to take the plunge, here’s the right way to make the switch, and what you can expect during the changeover.

What to Expect

Maybe you've heard the rumors about a super-sweaty detox period when going aluminum free? After years (or decades) of having your sweat ducts plugged up by the aluminum salts in antiperspirants, your body needs to recalibrate and get used to sweating again. During this 'detox' or transition period - which typically lasts about 2 weeks - you may find yourself sweating more and notice a different, pungent odor from your sweat. Or maybe you're one of the luckier ones that experience no detox at all (everybody is different!).

If you do find that you're going through a detox period, hang in there and be consistent. Switching to a high-performance deodorant that keeps you protected while your body adapts can help. And, as much as you may want to revert back to your old antiperspirant on those sweatier days, try not to as it will make it harder for your body to fully adjust. Be prepared for a mid-day refresh if needed and stay the course. The detox will be over soon.

To help the detox along, you may want to try a charcoal- or clay-based mask under your arms, or a mild acid-based facial toner, to draw impurities from your skin. You can also give your skin a little extra love with some extra virgin coconut oil or Manuka honey as an overnight treatment. The good news is that a lot of people report that, once they pass through the detox period, they tend to sweat less overall.

Consider the Ingredients

Many natural deodorants rely on baking soda as a powerful odor neutralizer. While this is a great ingredient to protect against odor, not all baking soda-based formulas are created equal. Choose a formula with a lower concentration of the ingredient and a soft, smooth texture to avoid irritating delicate underarm skin. Another one to watch out for - essential oils. Many natural deodorants use loads of essential oils which can irritate your skin.

If you find that your skin is irritated when you start using your new deodorant, here are a few tips. Try splitting up when you shave and when you apply your aluminum-free deodorant, spacing it out by 20-30 minutes or shaving your underarms at night and applying your deodorant in the morning. Also you may want to try a fragrance and essential oil-free formula. And lastly, make sure to soothe and nourish your skin to reduce redness and inflammation. You can apply one of those all-star natural remedies mentioned above - extra virgin coconut oil or Manuka honey - or a skin-soothing balm with calendula flower extract to before you go to bed.

Keep It Dry

You’ve heard this one before: Bacteria thrive in warm, moist environments. Your #1 weapon to fight off the source of underarm stench? Keeping things clean and dry. When switching to an aluminum-free deodorant, be sure to carefully pat your underarms dry after you get out of the shower, before applying product.

Also, some clean beauty brands include ingredients specifically designed to safely provide a clean, dry feeling. To create Type:A’s dry-cream formula, we tested many combinations of starches, including arrowroot powder, cornstarch, and tapioca, to discover the optimal balance for the strongest naturally-based protection.

Looking for the best aluminum-free deodorant for your foray into clean personal care? Click here to learn more about Type:A’s aluminum-free deodorant, including both the natural ingredients and the safe synthetics it uses, and how its sweat-activated technology works to keep you feeling fresh during your toughest workouts.

Ready to switch to the best aluminum-free deodorant? You're in the right place.

Written by Kristen Geil

Natural Deodorant Rash: Why Your Natural Deodorant Is ...

08-04-2020 · If your natural deodorant is giving you a rash, acne (the dreaded armpit pimple!), or redness, here’s what you have to know.

08-04-2020

If you recently started using natural deodorant and then developed a rash or some other kind of skin reaction, you’re not alone. People make the switch to natural deodorant for all sorts of reasons, from concerns over specific ingredients to an appreciation for essential oils. But for a subset of people, it can also lead to some unpleasant results, like a rash, sensitivity, redness, or acne. That’s particularly true for people with sensitive skin.

That’s because, despite their “clean” marketing and aesthetics, natural deodorants are just as likely to cause irritated skin as any other product. “Many people are surprised and dismayed when they develop a rash after using a natural deodorant,” Maral K. Skelsey, M.D., clinical associate professor of dermatology at Georgetown University, tells SELF. But, she explains, “natural and nontoxic don’t mean side-effect-free.

First, a word about what we mean when we say “natural deodorant” in the first place. The term natural doesn’t actually have any kind of regulations around it, but typically when people think of natural deo, they’re thinking of deodorant that’s aluminum-free and usually coconut-oil- or baking-soda-based. As SELF has previously reported, there’s no reason to worry about or avoid using a traditional deodorant or antiperspirant containing aluminum (a common, yet thankfully unfounded, fear).

All that said, there’s nothing wrong with giving a natural deodorant a try if you’re curious, even if you do have sensitive skin. But before you do, here are a few things you should keep in mind if you want to avoid a natural-deodorant-induced rash or other type of skin reaction.

Natural deodorants can actually contain several common irritants.

First, natural deodorants often contain baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate, to help neutralize body odor, but its alkaline nature, which is more basic than the skin’s natural pH, can easily prompt a skin reaction, says Neelam Vashi, M.D., associate professor of dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine and director of the Boston University Cosmetic and Laser Center at Boston Medical Center. It’s such a known irritant, in fact, that some natural deodorant brands, whose regular formulas include baking soda, now offer baking-soda-free products for sensitive skin.

That said, baking soda isn’t the only ingredient in natural deodorants that can cause irritation. Essential oils like lemongrass, tea tree, lavender, peppermint, cloves, and sandalwood are used as fragrances in natural deodorants, but many of these oils are common irritants, especially among people with sensitive skin. If you know that certain fragrances or botanical ingredients make you break out in a rash, proceed with caution and always check the ingredient list before buying anything new, Dr. Skelsey says.

Finally, coconut oil, which usually acts as a skin conditioner in natural deodorants, also may cause allergic reactions thanks to the surfactants and emulsifiers that are added to it, Mayra Maymone, M.D., researcher at the University of Colorado dermatology department explains. She adds that lichen extract is a lesser-known plant-derived ingredient that may offer antibacterial benefits, but can similarly lead to skin irritation.

These are the types of reactions you should watch out for.

If your skin reacts to a natural deodorant, it’s most likely a case of contact dermatitis, Dr. Skelsey says, adding that any of the ingredients mentioned above can trigger this reaction. It generally looks like a red, itchy rash that scales or peels, and there are two types of contact dermatitis to be aware of.

seniorcare2share.com

30-09-2021 · Is it bad to use deodorant with aluminum? Deodorants, for the most part, don’t use aluminum as an ingredient. Medical research shows that aluminum from antiperspirants can build up in your body. There’s no scientific evidence that directly links aluminum to cancers and other health conditions, though.

30-09-2021

The most common concern about aluminum in antiperspirants and other skin care products is that it’s linked to breast cancers. Medical research on whether aluminum causes cancer isn’t clear. summary. Aluminum from antiperspirants may build up in breast tissue after years of use.

Why is it better to use aluminum free deodorant?

Underarm sweat can be smelly, sticky and annoying. Antiperspirants contain aluminum salts to prevent sweat from reaching the skin’s surface, while aluminum-free deodorants help fight odor without blocking pores.

Is aluminum free deodorant better?

The major difference between deodorant without aluminum and deodorant with aluminum is that the former blocks odor whereas the latter blocks sweat. Antiperspirants do not attack odor-causing bacteria, but instead use aluminum ingredients to alter the body’s natural perspiration process and block sweat from the start.

Why do companies put aluminum in deodorant?

What Purpose Does Aluminum Serve in Deodorants? The aluminum compounds found in antiperspirants, Schueller says, not only reduce wetness by blocking your underarm sweat ducts, but they also minimize body odor by inhibiting the bacteria that feed on your sweat and cause it.

Is aluminum in deodorant cancer causing?

However, no studies to date have confirmed any substantial adverse effects of aluminum that could contribute to increased breast cancer risks. A 2014 review concluded there was no clear evidence showing that the use of aluminum-containing underarm antiperspirants or cosmetics increases the risk of breast cancer (5).

Is it bad to use deodorant with aluminum?

Deodorants, for the most part, don’t use aluminum as an ingredient. Medical research shows that aluminum from antiperspirants can build up in your body. There’s no scientific evidence that directly links aluminum to cancers and other health conditions, though.

What is the healthiest deodorant to use?

Healthline’s picks for the best natural deodorants Distilled Bath & Body Pit Liquor Whiskey Vanilla Deodorant. Native Plastic-Free Deodorant. Weleda Citrus Deodorant. Energy Balance Crystal Deodorant. megababe Rosy Pits Daily Deodorant. Kosas Chemistry AHA Serum Deodorant. Meow Meow Tweet Lavender Bergamot Deodorant Stick.

Is it worth switching to natural deodorant?

According to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, conventional antiperspirant deodorants are safe — so there’s no need to worry or switch to a natural deodorant on account of your overall health. A natural deodorant will help with armpit odor, but not sweat.

How do you detox your armpits?

Most armpit detoxes use a homemade mask of bentonite clay and apple cider vinegar. Some also include water to dilute the vinegar. Others use equal parts bentonite clay and coconut oil for a more soothing, hydrating mix that still has some antibacterial properties, thanks to the coconut oil.

Is it better to use natural deodorant?

But experts, including an oncologist, an epidemiologist, a skin microbiome expert and several dermatologists, said that there is no definitive evidence that regular deodorants or antiperspirants are worse for your health than natural deodorants. Jun 9, 2021.

What is the safest underarm deodorant to use?

The Best Aluminum-Free Deodorants 1 Chemistry AHA Serum Deodorant. Kosas. 2 Zero Aluminum Pomegranate & Lemon Verbena Deodorant. Dove Beauty. No Essential Oils. 4 0% Aluminum Odor Protect Deodorant Stick. 5 The Deodorant. Fragrance-Free. 7 Secret Aluminum Free Deodorant Lavender. 8 Sunny Pits Daily Deodorant.

Does Dove have aluminum free deodorant?

If all you need is something to keep you feeling fresh, choose an aluminum-free deodorant instead. Our Dove 0% Deodorant gives you up to 24 hours of odor protection. If all you’re searching for is odor protection in a deodorant without aluminum, try Dove 0% Deodorant.

Is aluminum chloride safe for underarms?

According to qualified experts, aluminum chloride is safe. It’s been tested for over eight decades. Study after study demonstrates that there is no connection between antiperspirants and breast cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, kidney disease or any other malady.

Can you get cancer from deodorant?

The bottom line: No studies have confirmed any connection between the use of deodorants and antiperspirants or their ingredients to increased cancer risk, so there’s no reason to break that morning routine.

Does Secret deodorant have aluminum?

Secret deodorant for women does not contain aluminum, parabens or dyes. Instead of keeping you from sweating, Secret deodorant works to keep the bacteria under your arms from creating body odor. For many women, this product is a great option for keeping odor-free through the day.

What ingredients should you avoid in deodorant?

Is your Deodorant Dangerous? 7 Key Ingredients to Avoid ALUMINIUM COMPOUNDS AND SALTS. Aluminium is a common active ingredient in many antiperspirants, as it essentially plugs the sweat gland to minimise perspiration. ALCOHOL. PARABENS. PROPYLENE GLYCOL. TRICLOSAN. PHTHALATES. PARFUM OR FRAGRANCE.

Why does aluminum free deodorant not work?

“If something’s not working for you right away, it’s because it’s adjusted to the old way of doing things,” says Guzzo. Give a new product a few weeks to start fully working, but if it’s still leaving you stinking after that, it’s probably not the right formulation for your skin chemistry.

What aluminum does to your body?

Previous studies have linked frequent exposure to high levels of aluminum to neurotoxicity (adverse health effects on the central or peripheral nervous system or both), Alzheimer’s disease, and breast cancer.

Which deodorant should I use?

If you don’t sweat a ton, Banks recommends looking for so-called natural deodorants that have baking soda, cornstarch and essential oils like lavender and eucalyptus, rather than aluminum. If you need more sweat protection, then swipe on an antiperspirant with aluminum to temporarily block sweat glands.

What is the safest antiperspirant to use?

Real Purity Roll-On. Almay Clear Gel Anti-Perspirant – Fragrance Free (3 PACK) Speed Stick By Mennen Power Antiperspirant & Deodorant Solid – Unscented (6 PACK) Arrid XX Antiperspirant & Deodorant Solid, Unscented. DERMAdoctor Total Nonscents, Ultra-Gentle Antiperspirant.

What happens when you switch to aluminum free deodorant?

As your body continues to become accustomed to living without aluminum, its sweat and odor levels will self-regulate and begin to function normally. That means you’ll sweat slightly more than when you used antiperspirant, but considerably less than if you were to use nothing at all.

Does Secret make aluminum free deodorant?

Secret Aluminum Free Deodorant provides up to 48 hours of odor protection that is free of aluminum, parabens, dyes, and talc. The new dry stick formula is certified cruelty-free by PETA and has been designed to be gentle while providing premium odor protection.

Related Posts
Why Does Natural Deodorant Give Me a Rash?

21-08-2019 · If you’ve been using aluminum or some sort of other chemically based deodorant your entire life, switching to natural deodorant may have some side effects at first. Your armpits will undergo what is known as a “detox period”, as the body will need a little bit of time to adjust to the natural ingredients. During this detox phase, you may have noticed that natural deodorant give you a rash.

21-08-2019

If you’ve been using aluminum or some sort of other chemically based deodorant your entire life, switching to natural deodorant may have some side effects at first. Your armpits will undergo what is known as a “detox period”, as the body will need a little bit of time to adjust to the natural ingredients.

During this detox phase, you may have noticed that natural deodorant give you a rash. You first impulse will be to blame one of the ingredients in the deodorant, but you may not actually be allergic to any of them. So, what causes this rash and how can you make it go away.

Types of Rashes

Skin irritation, closeup

Just because you’re using natural deodorant doesn’t mean you’re doing everything right in terms of pit health. And even if you are, there are many external factors that can cause a rash in this particular area of your body. The five most common types of underarm rashes include:

  • Contact dermatitis – It’s typically caused when one of the ingredients in the natural deodorant that you’re using trigger a reaction for your immune system. When contact dermatitus happens, you may have to switch your natural deodorant brand with another. If you can identify the particular ingredients that’s causing the rash, simply look for a natural deodorant alternative that doesn’t contain said ingredients.
  • Irritant contact dermatitis – There are certain substances that can alter the skin’s natural pH level, or that simply damage the outer layer of the skin. Baking soda is an ingredient notorious for having this effect. Switching to natural deodorant can initially take a toll on your skin, because it alters the pH, which requires time to find balance despite the fact that you’re feeding it natural ingredients.
  • Phototoxic contact dermatitis – This usually occurs when an area as sensitive as your underarm is exposed to too much sunlight or sunburn. As this happens, you are more likely to develop a rash.
    allergic rash skin of patient arm
  • Intertrigo – Bacteria is found all over your skin. Your pits are no exception. Intertrigo is a type of rash that commonly appears in the fold of the skin that experience heavy friction plus bacteria presence. Because there is a high chance of developing a yeast infection in these areas, it’s also likely to end up with an armpit rash.
  • Prickly heat rash – This type of rash usually occurs in people that live in hot and humid areas. Sweat is your body’s way of regulating temperature, so the hotter you feel, the more likely the body is to sweat excessively. This causes the pores of your armpits to become clogged (particularly with dead skin cells), which can lead to a rash.

Baking Soda

Close-up of baking soda in a glass jar. Bicarbonate of soda.

Baking soda has a rich alkaline pH. This means that using too much baking soda on your skin can cause a reaction, such as rash. But even if the amount of baking soda in the natural deodorant you’re using is just right, you may be extra sensitive to this ingredient. It’s not the best for sensitive skin.

Your skin has a moisture barrier, one that baking soda can impair. However, this moisture barrier can also be damaged by your shower gel, as this product can contain chemicals and sulfates as well.

In order to prevent this from happening, you should consider using a mild, maybe even a natural glycerine soap for your armpits. There are plenty of natural options, with deliciously-smelling ingredients, like cocoa, coconut, mango, or rose. You can also rebuild this moisture barrier by using body butter that’s rich in essential oils and fatty acids.

Shaving

Body care. Young woman shaving her armpit

Shaving your armpits can inevitably cause little cuts on the surface of the skin. If you’ve ever applied deodorant right after shaving and felt a sting, that’s what was causing it. Naturally, this can lead to irritation in the underarm.

A good idea would be to shave in the evening and then apply deodorant in the morning. This will give your skin time to heal from these cuts. Make sure that you never use a dull razor for shaving.

Sweating

Close-up asian woman with hyperhidrosis sweating. Young asia woman with sweat stain on her clothes against grey background. Healthcare concept.

Oddly enough, people never think that their underarm rash can be caused by sweat itself. Since you’ve switched to natural deodorant, this means that your pores will no longer be clogged with aluminum, so there are no antiperspirants in effect here. Translation: natural deodorant doesn’t stop sweating.

And you don’t want it to, either. Sweat is a natural body reaction, which helps regulate the body’s temperature, while also relieving it from toxins. But those of you that sweat too much are very likely to feel and itchiness caused by the excess perspiration. Regardless of whether you’ll be scratching your skin or not, this can lead to irritation and inflammation.

Here’s how to prevent this from happening:

  • In periods when you are likely to sweat more (like in the summertime or after going to the gym), make sure that you thoroughly clean your pits, using mild or natural soap. This will prevent bacteria build-up, but also cleanses the skin from trapped sweat.
  • After showering, consider using a talc-free baby powder, as this can absorb moisture and prevents irritation and rashes.
    Portrait of young beautiful woman in white towel after shower
  • A good idea would be to avoid the use of synthetic clothes. Not only so they prevent your skin from breathing, but they don’t have the moisture wicking properties of a fabric such as cotton. Wear not just comfortable clothes, but make sure they are efficient in times of excessive sweat.

For Kids And Teens

There are some great options for natural deodorant for teens and kids that won’t give them a rash.  You don’t have to worry about the ingredients in these products because they are much more natural, which is what you want when your child has sensitive skin. These types of deodorants will also help keep their underarms dry so there’s no need to use an antiperspirant or spray on any type of product.

Bottom Line

While using natural deodorant is good, this is not the only step required for proper armpit hygiene. Even if you’re smearing natural ingredients all over your skin, there are other skincare rituals that should be sacred if you truly want to avoid a rash.

Shaving and then immediately applying deodorant, even if it’s natural, is a bad idea. It’s also important to wash your armpits daily using natural or mild soap, to kill the bacteria that reside on the surface of the skin. Also, keep in mind that even if you’re using natural deodorant, you might still be “feeding” your armpits with chemicals from shower gels.

Top Aluminum-Free Deodorants for Men from Old Spice

All Old Spice deodorants fight odor and keep you smelling fresh. On top of that, all Old Spice deodorants are aluminum-free. Old Spice antiperspirants take on an extra task – they reduce sweating at the source to help prevent wetness before it starts.

Which Old Spice sweat protection contains aluminum and why?
All Old Spice deodorants fight odor and keep you smelling fresh. On top of that, all Old Spice deodorants are aluminum-free. Old Spice antiperspirants take on an extra task – they reduce sweating at the source to help prevent wetness before it starts. Unlike deodorants, antiperspirants contain aluminum to keep you feeling dry.

Can I still block odor with an aluminum-free deodorant?

Yes, all Old Spice aluminum-free deodorants help control odor in two ways. They inhibit odor causing bacteria and contain extraordinary scents to keep you smelling fresh.

What are the best Old Spice aluminum-free deodorants?

That’s a trick question. All of Old Spice’s deodorants are free of aluminum. So, choose the scent you like and apply it daily to become a legend of confidence. If you need help finding the best one for you, we’ve got these tips:

  1. For aluminum-free deodorant with up to 48-hour odor protection: 
    If you’re looking for great protection you can count on, look no further than the #1 Recommended Odor Fighter. Our Swagger Deodorant overpowers stink and leaves you smelling like confidence.
  2. For aluminum-free deodorant with nature-inspired ingredients: 
    For those who want to smell like the earth itself, our Fiji with Palm Tree Deodorant is the perfect pick. Forged with real ingredients, this deodorant will destroy underarm odor for up to 48 hours.
  3. For aluminum-free deodorant with a long-lasting scent: 
    Get up to 48-hour odor protection and an amazing scent with our Krakengard Deodorant. It smells like citrus, fresh herbs, and the unspeakable power of the ancient ocean.
No, you shouldn’t worry about aluminum in your ...

Deodorants mask body odors and target the bacteria that make your armpits smell bad. Antiperspirants, on the other hand, decrease your sweat production. Antiperspirants containing aluminum work by forming a plug at the surface of the sweat duct and blocking the duct, preventing sweat production and release.

 aluminumdeoderant_large

Over the past few years, you may have heard growing concern over the existence of aluminum in antiperspirants and its possible links to cancer. Amid the fears and rumors, antiperspirant brands from boutique to big-name have begun to tout their aluminum-free offerings.

But should you worry?

As a dermatologist who frequently recommends aluminum-containing antiperspirants to my patients, I say, emphatically, no.

The claim that aluminum-containing antiperspirants cause cancer is a myth that has been debunked in the minds of doctors and scientists, and so it’s time to put lingering doubts for consumers to rest.

Let’s walk through how antiperspirants work, how this rumor got started and why this is one issue you shouldn’t sweat.

How antiperspirants work

There’s a major difference between deodorants and antiperspirants, and it all comes down to sweat vs. smell. Deodorants mask body odors and target the bacteria that make your armpits smell bad.

Antiperspirants, on the other hand, decrease your sweat production. Antiperspirants containing aluminum work by forming a plug at the surface of the sweat duct and blocking the duct, preventing sweat production and release.

Why people became concerned about aluminum

In the early 2000s, researchers began looking into whether aluminum in antiperspirants was linked to breast cancer. Early studies—despite offering no clear scientific evidence or proof of any correlation—raised some concern, which took off in popular media and were further spread by alarmist websites and emails.

These studies were ultimately debunked by thorough, responsible research. An exhaustive 2014 review published in Critical Reviews in Toxicology showed no correlation between aluminum-containing antiperspirants and increased cancer risk, specifically breast cancer. While one in eight women will develop breast cancer, the use of an antiperspirant is not the instigating risk factor.

Why you should feel safe using antiperspirants containing aluminum

For a compound to cause cancer, it would have to be absorbed into the bloodstream at a concentration high enough to cause toxicity. That’s not going to happen with a daily dab of antiperspirant.

You’re using only a small amount of antiperspirant at any given time, and your body isn’t absorbing the aluminum chemical—it stays outside of the body at the opening of the sweat duct. Your skin is a mighty barrier to the outside world.

So you can relax and stay dry knowing that aluminum-containing antiperspirants are a safe, convenient and effective option to stop sweating. I recommend them to my patients without hesitation.

Susan Massick is a dermatologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and an assistant professor in the Ohio State College of Medicine. Follow her on Twitter @SusanMassickMD.

What is Aluminum Free Deodorant?

What makes Native’s aluminum free deodorant different: Antiperspirants contain chemicals like parabens, sulfates, and aluminum. Native’s ingredients are effective at fighting odor, while making you feel comfortable throughout the day. Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda) & Magnesium Hydroxide: Partner to help neutralize odor-causing bacteria.

When making healthy life choices we often focus on the things we eat, drink, and generally put IN our bodies. But have you considered what goes ON your body? Take your deodorant for example! It’s one of those things that you (hopefully) put on every day, but most traditional deodorants can contain aluminum, which prevents perspiration by plugging your sweat glands.

But don’t sweat it! Using an aluminum free deodorant will help you feel fresh while using ingredients you’re already familiar with.

What makes Native’s aluminum free deodorant different: 

  • Antiperspirants contain chemicals like parabens, sulfates, and aluminum.
  • Native’s ingredients are effective at fighting odor, while making you feel comfortable throughout the day.
  • Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda) & Magnesium Hydroxide: Partner to help neutralize odor-causing bacteria
  • Tapioca Starch: Minimizes the icky feeling of sweat
  • Coconut Oil and Shea Butter: Great moisturizers rich in antioxidants and vitamins

Still need extra odor protection? You can get our deodorant in a range of scents that smell like relaxing spa days to tropical getaways. There’s an option for everyone—women, men, and even unique scents for teens!