Why Do I Pee So Often?- VyWhy

Last updated on 2021-12-24 04:14:42

2022-09-26

You went to the bathroom to pee just a few minutes ago. Now you need to go again. What’s going on? WebMD's slideshow will explain some of the more common possible reasons.

Medically Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on September 11, 2020

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It’s not just in straight H2O. You get 20-30% of water from foods, and more from other beverages. It may seem obvious, but too much water will make you pee more. That could lower the salt in your blood to unhealthy levels. Follow the “Goldilocks” rule: Drink enough to keep your urine clear or light yellow, but not so much that you spend all day in the bathroom.

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It’s the most common cause of frequent peeing. Bacteria infect your kidneys, bladder, or the tubes that connect them to each other and to the outside world. Your bladder swells and can’t hold as much urine, which may be cloudy, bloody, or strange-smelling. You might also have fever, chills, nausea, and pain in your side or lower belly. Your doctor will likely prescribe antibiotics to get rid of the infection.

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Both type 1 and type 2 raise your blood sugar. Your kidneys try to filter it out, but they can’t always keep up. So the sugar ends up in your urine. This draws more water from your body and makes you pee more. The frequent urge to go is one of the first and most common signs of diabetes. Talk to your doctor if you suddenly start to pee more than usual.

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This is a different condition from type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Here, your body can’t use or doesn’t make enough vasopressin, a hormone that normally tells your kidneys to release water into your blood when you need it. You may feel tired, nauseated, confused, and very, very thirsty. You also might pee as much as 15 liters a day, or five times more than normal. Your doctor can help you manage it with medication.

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Also known as water pills, these drugs treat high blood pressure and liver and kidney problems. They make your kidneys release more salt (sodium) into your urine, which makes you pee more. This may cause you to lose too much sodium and potassium, which could be bad for your health. You might be dizzy, achy, and nauseated. Talk to your doctor before you stop or change your dose.

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You might feel like you have to go all the time, but not much flows out. You also might have pain in your lower belly that gets worse when you pee or have sex. It seems to happen when your bladder tissue gets swollen and very sensitive. It’s not always clear what causes that. You can treat this condition, which is also called interstitial cystitis, with diet and exercise, medication, surgery, and physical therapy. 

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Minerals and salts can form tiny rocks in your kidney. You usually feel like you have to go often but don’t make much pee. You also may have nausea, fever, chills, and serious pain in your side and back that branches down to your groin in waves. Extra weight, dehydration, high-protein diets, and family history make them more likely. The stones might come out on their own, or you might need surgery.

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As your baby grows in your belly, it takes up more space and pushes on your bladder, which makes you want to go sooner. But even before that, when your baby was an embryo implanted in your uterus, it triggered your body to make a pregnancy hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin that makes you pee more. Talk to your doctor if hurts to pee or you see blood in your urine.

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It sometimes damages nerves that control your bladder. You may want to go more often, but you may not pee much. Or you might gush a lot of urine. Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, and other brain diseases may have similar effects.  Your doctor can help you change your diet and bathroom habits to lessen symptoms. You may need medication or surgery in serious cases.

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It’s when your vagina gets infected and inflamed from yeast, bacteria, viruses, medication, or hormonal changes. It also can happen from chemicals in creams, sprays, or clothes. You may itch or burn when you pee, and hurt during sex. You also might notice a discharge and a smell, and feel like you have to pee more often.

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They can act as a diuretic and flush more water out of you. They also curb your body’s production of vasopressin, a hormone that normally tells your kidneys to release more water to your body instead of sending it straight to your bladder. It’s a good idea to sip water along with your cocktail, beer, or wine. While the effects of caffeine can be serious, it takes a lot more coffee to have the same effect as alcohol. 

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That’s the area of your lower belly. When the muscles get stretched and weak, which may happen in pregnancy and childbirth, the bladder might move out of position. Or your urethra, the tube you pee through, might be stretched out. Both could cause you to leak pee.

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This is when a woman stops having their period, around age 50. Your body produces less of the hormone estrogen, and that can make you want to pee more. Your doctor might be able to help with hormone replacement therapy, diet changes, and other treatments.

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Both cancerous and benign tumors can make you pee more because they take up more space in or around your bladder. Blood in your urine is the most important sign if it’s cancer. Talk to your doctor if you see blood, notice a lump in your lower belly, or find that it hurts to pee.

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Men have a walnut-sized gland, the prostate, that can grow larger after age 25. An enlarged prostate can make your pee stream feel weak and uneven. You might feel like you have to go more, sometimes urgently. Rarely, this may be a sign of more serious conditions like cancer. Your doctor can help rule out other causes and treat your enlarged prostate.

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If you haven’t pooped in a while (constipation), your bowel could get so full that it pushes on your bladder and makes you feel like you have to pee more often or really bad. Constipation can add to the problem by weakening your pelvic floor muscles, which help control your bowel and bladder. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about how to get regular again.

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Deep sleep signals your body to make a hormone (ADH) that tells your body to hold onto water until you wake up. Sleep apnea interrupts your breathing for brief spells. This stops your body from getting to the stage where it makes ADH. Plus, your blood doesn’t get as much oxygen, which triggers your kidneys to get rid of water.

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SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Sleep Apnea,” “Bladder Cancer,” “Overactive bladder,” “Vaginitis,” “Pregnancy: Am I Pregnant?” “Urination: Frequent Urination,” “Urinary Tract Infections,” “Interstitial Cystitis (Painful Bladder Syndrome),” “What Your Bladder is Trying to Tell You About Your Health.”

Continence Foundation of Australia: “Constipation.”

Diabetes.co.uk: “Polyuria - Frequent Urination.”

Drinkaware Trust: “Why does alcohol make you pee more?”

Harvard Health Publishing: “4 tips for coping with an enlarged prostate.”

Mayo Clinic: “Kidney Stones,” “Diuretics,” “Diabetes insipidus,” “Water: How much should you drink every day?”

Nutrients: “Contribution of Water from Food and Fluids to Total Water Intake: Analysis of a French and UK Population Surveys.”

Prostate Cancer Foundation: “Prostate Cancer Signs and Symptoms.”

Urology Care Foundation: “When Nerve Damage Causes Bladder Problems: Neurogenic Bladder.”

Forteo (Teriparatide) for Treating Osteoporosis

Teriparatide ( Forteo) is a synthetic version of the human parathyroid hormone, which helps to regulate calcium metabolism. It promotes the growth of new bone, while other osteoporosis …

Medically Reviewed by David Zelman, MD on June 09, 2021

Teriparatide (Forteo) is a synthetic version of the human parathyroid hormone, which helps to regulate calcium metabolism. It promotes the growth of new bone, while other osteoporosis medications improve bone density by inhibiting bone resorption, or breakdown. It is the only osteoporosis medicine approved by the FDA that rebuilds bone.

Forteo should be used only in men with osteoporosis and postmenopausal women.

Teriparatide (Forteo) is self-injected into the skin. Because long-term safety is not yet established, it is only FDA-approved for 24 months of use. It reduces spine fractures in women with known osteoporosis, and evidence also exists that it reduces hip fractures.

Forteo is indicated for treatment of:

  • Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture
  • Men and women with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis at high risk for fracture
  • Men with primary or hypogonadal osteoporosis at high risk for fracture

High risk for fracture,is defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, multiple risk factors for fracture, or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy

Forteo is not used to prevent osteoporosis or to treat mild cases.

Forteo's side effects may include:

Other side effects are also possible. Tell your doctor if you think Forteo is having a bad effect on your well-being.

© 2021 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved. View privacy policy and trust info

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Find patient medical information for alfuzosin oral on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, interactions, pictures, warnings and user ratings.

Before taking alfuzosin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease, kidney disease, heart problems (such as chest pain/angina, heart attack), low blood pressure, certain eye problems (cataracts, glaucoma).

Alfuzosin may cause a condition that affects the heart rhythm (QT prolongation). QT prolongation can rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) fast/irregular heartbeat and other symptoms (such as severe dizziness, fainting) that need medical attention right away.

The risk of QT prolongation may be increased if you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that may cause QT prolongation. Before using alfuzosin, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take and if you have any of the following conditions: certain heart problems (heart failure, slow heartbeat, QT prolongation in the EKG), family history of certain heart problems (QT prolongation in the EKG, sudden cardiac death).

Low levels of potassium or magnesium in the blood may also increase your risk of QT prolongation. This risk may increase if you use certain drugs (such as diuretics/"water pills") or if you have conditions such as severe sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting. Talk to your doctor about using alfuzosin safely.

This drug may make you dizzy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

Before having surgery (including cataract/glaucoma eye surgery), tell your doctor or dentist if you are taking or have ever taken this medication, and about all the other products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially dizziness and low blood pressure when getting up from a sitting or lying position, and QT prolongation (see above). These side effects can also increase the risk of falling.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

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Find patient medical information for Vicks VapoInhaler nasal on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, interactions, pictures, warnings and …

How to use Vicks Vapoinhaler Inhaler

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Side Effects

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Interactions

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

Does Vicks Vapoinhaler Inhaler interact with other drugs you are taking?

Enter your medication into the WebMD interaction checker

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing , call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Notes

No monograph available at this time.

Missed Dose

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Storage

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

webmd.com

Find patient medical information for Vagisil vaginal on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, interactions, pictures, warnings and user ratings.

How to use Vagisil Cream

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Side Effects

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Interactions

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

Does Vagisil Cream interact with other drugs you are taking?

Enter your medication into the WebMD interaction checker

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing , call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Notes

No monograph available at this time.

Missed Dose

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Storage

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

Vaginal Plastic Surgery: Vaginoplasty and Labiaplasty …

Vaginoplasty is a procedure that aims to "tighten up" a vagina that's become slack or loose from vaginal childbirth or aging. Some surgeons claim it can even improve sensitivity -- a claim the...

Vaginoplasty is a procedure that aims to "tighten up" a vagina that's become slack or loose from vaginal childbirth or aging. Some surgeons claim it can even improve sensitivity -- a claim the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has strongly challenged.

While it's true that vaginal tissues can stretch, surgically tightening the vaginal tissue in itself cannot guarantee a heightened sexual response, since desire, arousal, and orgasm are complex, highly personal responses, conditioned as much by emotional, spiritual, and interpersonal factors as aesthetic ones. In addition, sexual "sensitivity" doesn't automatically lead to more pleasure - it can actually lead to pain.

Labiaplasty, plastic surgery on the labia (the “lips" surrounding the vagina), can be performed alone or with vaginoplasty. Surgery can be performed on the labia major (the larger, outer vaginal lips), or the labia minor (the smaller, inner vaginal lips). Labiaplasty changes the size or shape of the labia, typically making them smaller or correcting an asymmetry between them.

In order to decide if you should consider vaginoplasty or labiaplasty, it’s important to understand the difference between reconstructive surgery and cosmetic surgery.

Reconstructive surgery improves the function of a body part, while cosmetic surgery changes the aesthetics of essentially normal anatomy. You can think of it like a nose job: a surgeon can restructure the interior nasal cavities to help you breathe better or reshape the nose, just for the sake of appearances.

It's a critical distinction, because the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists evaluates surgeries and outcomes to fix functional problems, such as urinary incontinence. But ACOG remains skeptical and cautious about cosmetic vaginal surgery due to its risks and lack of scientific data on safety and effectiveness.

Some vaginoplasty procedures, for instance, were originally developed as reconstructive surgeries to repair birth defects when the vagina was malformed, too short, or absent (such as in vaginal agenesis), so that a girl could grow up to have normal urination, menstruation, and intercourse.

More recently, vaginoplasty has grown into a group of cosmetic surgeries marketed as "vaginal rejuvenation" and "designer vagina" procedures. Plastic surgeons and gynecologists are marketing their own array of designer vaginoplasty surgeries, claiming the same benefits to women as with other cosmetic surgeries, such as beauty, self-esteem, and confidence.

In fact, says ACOG, women's genitals naturally have a wide range of normal appearances that are anatomically correct. There's no one "look" or right way for a vagina and labia to be formed.

Recently, laser technology has been introduced by some surgeons for "vaginal rejuvenation" and other vaginal surgeries to replace the traditional scalpel.

Individual doctors who are members of the American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) offer various "vaginal rejuvenation" procedures, but the ASPS itself does not endorse particular surgeries and cautions that "vaginal rejuvenation" surgery may need further scientific study to determine efficacy and success. None of the cosmetic vaginoplasty surgeries are considered accepted, routine procedures by ACOG.

Here are some examples of "vaginal rejuvenation" and "designer vagina" procedures:

"Revirgination." The hymen, the thin tissue at the entrance to the vagina, normally "breaks" the first time a woman has intercourse. A surgery called a hymenoplasty repairs the hymen to mimic its original, virginal state, before a woman was sexually active. Because of the strong religious convictions surrounding the importance of virginity in some cultures, this is among the most controversial of cosmetic vaginal surgeries.

Clitoral unhooding. Some surgeons are marketing a procedure called clitoral unhooding, which removes the tissue that normally covers the clitoris.

G-spot amplification. The front wall of the vagina, some experts believe, holds the highly erotic G-spot, an especially sensitive stimulation site for female arousal and orgasm. The G-spot amplification procedure involves injecting collagen into the front wall of the vagina, theoretically to increase pleasure.

Women's long-term satisfaction and complication rates from vaginoplasty and labiaplasty have not been tracked. Further, because these surgeries have not been evaluated in peer-reviewed medical journals the way other surgeries have been -- some procedures are proprietary and trademarked -- ACOG considers them "unproven."

The risks of vaginal cosmetic surgery include:

  • Infection
  • Permanent changes in sensation
  • Ongoing pain
  • Scarring

The best advice for women considering vaginal surgery: talk openly with your doctor about your feelings and concerns about your genitals, as well as your expectations for surgery and any possible non-surgical options. Targeted Kegel-like exercises can tone weak, loose vaginal muscles, for instance, and enhance sexual arousal; and counseling can address issues of sexual self-esteem and confidence.

Some questions to ask your surgeon include:

  • What are the short-term and long-term risks and complications of surgery?
  • What are the benefits?
  • Will I experience reduced sensation in my vagina or clitoris after surgery?
  • Will surgery affect my ability to have an orgasm?
  • Are there any restrictions on use of feminine hygiene products, such as tampons, after surgery?
  • Will surgery affect future pregnancy and childbirth?
  • Are my expectations for surgery realistic?
  • What are the non-surgical options?

Most health insurance plans don't cover vaginoplasty, labiaplasty, or other plastic surgery that's elective rather than medically necessary. Only occasionally, according to ACOG, is labiaplasty medically necessary, such as with labia hypertrophy (overgrowth) caused by excess testosterone, congenital conditions, or chronic irritation.

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Phenibut can cause many side effects, including reduced consciousness, dizziness, nausea, poor balance, and fatigue. Taking large doses can cause trouble breathing, unconsciousness, and …

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Bryonia is a plant. People use the root for medicine. The berries of the plant are poisonous. Bryonia root is used as a laxative, to induce vomiting, for liver disease, infection, and many other ...

Francisco, J. A., Gawlak, S. L., Miller, M., Bathe, J., Russell, D., Chace, D., Mixan, B., Zhao, L., Fell, H. P., and Siegall, C. B. Expression and characterization of bryodin 1 and a bryodin 1-based single-chain immunotoxin from tobacco cell culture. Bioconjug.Chem. 1997;8(5):708-713. View abstract.

Gawlak, S. L., Neubauer, M., Klei, H. E., Chang, C. Y., Einspahr, H. M., and Siegall, C. B. Molecular, biological, and preliminary structural analysis of recombinant bryodin 1, a ribosome-inactivating protein from the plant Bryonia dioica. Biochemistry 3-18-1997;36(11):3095-3103. View abstract.

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