Why Do You Poop More On Your Period?- VyWhy

Last updated on 2021-12-18 13:34:05

2020-10-23

People often ‘forget’ to mention how much more you poo during your period. We’ve all experienced it - so let's talk about it!

Bloating, cramps and having to fight menstrual fatigue are all ordinary side effects that come with your period. You probably talk about these with your friends, letting them know you’re in pain, feeling on the tired side, or PMS-y. But among these common symptoms, people often ‘forget’ to talk about how much more frequently you poo during menstruation – we’ve all experienced it!

So why exactly do you poop more on your period?

Do you poo more on your period? Is it normal to poo more on your period?

It is completely normal to poop more on your period. The fluctuations in hormones during your menstruation means it’s natural for your body to encourage more or fewer bowel movements. But how exactly does your menstrual cycle affect your bowel movements? And what can you expect when pooing on your period?

How does your period affect your bowel movements?

Pooping more on your period

There’s actually a very simple explanation as to why you poop more on your period. When menstruating, your body increases its level of prostaglandin. This hormone is responsible for period cramps, to help shed the lining of you womb during your period. The prostaglandin also increases muscle contractions of the bowels. The more your bowels contract, the more you end up pooping. It really is that simple! With your bowels contracting more than normal it can also be common to have runnier poo or light diarrhoea in the first day or two of your period.

Pooping less on your period

While it’s common to see more poop on your period, not everybody experiences this pattern. During PMS, progesterone (the hormone for maintaining pregnancy) increases too. High levels of progesterone can cause food to move slower through your digestive system, resulting in constipation before or when your period begins.

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How can you make yourself poop more frequently?

If you’re experiencing mild constipation or just a slower pace in your bowel movements, our tips for increasing your visits to the toilet are:

  • Drink more water
  • Eat more fibrous foods like broccoli, wholegrain bread, beans, and pulses
  • Engage in some frequent light exercise

When to see a doctor?

The good news is that there’s no normal when it comes to period poo. The only time to be concerned and see/call a doctor is when your stools are coming out as liquid, containing blood or if you’re finding it painful to poo.

Want to feel fresher on-the-go after a period toilet trip? Check out our organic intimate wipes!

How to Dispose of a Tampon

08-11-2021 · If you’re new to tampons (or periods in general!), a great place to start is learning how to put a tampon in correctly, so that you can be comfortable and avoid leaks during your period. But …

08-11-2021

If you’re new to tampons (or periods in general!), a great place to start is learning how to put a tampon in correctly, so that you can be comfortable and avoid leaks during your period. But what you might not consider is what happens when you need to change them, and how to throw away used tampons. Read on to find out how to properly dispose of tampons.

Don’t flush tampons!

Let’s start with the essentials: you should never flush a tampon! Tampons do not break down quickly enough after flushing and can cause blockages. What’s worse, they can also contribute to fatbergs in sewage systems (you can read more about the problem of fatbergs here). In turn, this can cause harm to wildlife and ecosystems. This is why flushing tampons, used or otherwise, down the toilet should always be avoided. In fact, you should only ever flush the three Ps: pee, paper, and poo!

Wrap it and trash it

Instead of flushing them, you can dispose of used tampons by wrapping them in some toilet paper or the wrapper of the replacement period product and putting them in the trash. Hopefully, most bathrooms or toilet stalls you use will have designated garbage bins that you can use to throw away your tampons. In the frustrating cases where a bin isn’t provided in the bathroom, wrap your tampon up well in toilet paper and take it to your closest trashcan to dispose of it there. PSA: All bathrooms should provide adequate facilities for period waste, let the responsible person or business know if they’re falling short!

Compost your plastic free tampons

If you use compostable, plastic free tampons like Natracare tampons, you can also dispose of them in your compost!

organic non-applicator tampons

Natracare tampons are made from 100% certified organic cotton and absolutely nothing else, so they will break down in compost. Here’s everything you need to know about composting your tampons – including which types you can and cannot compost.

For more period tips, from using period products to pain relief, take a look at our period blogs!

Should Boys Be Taught About Periods?

23-08-2019 · Teaching both boys and girls about the way periods work and opening the topic up for constructive discussion is essential for clearing any of the common misconceptions, like that they are gross or that girls are in control of their bleeding. The environment. Period products are huge contributors to the tons of plastic waste created daily – one pack of conventional period pads contains the ...

23-08-2019

We recently spoke with George, our intern for the week, to find out what questions teenage boys have about periods. This process opened our eyes to the inconsistency of education across genders when it comes to people’s bodies and especially periods. 72% of boys have never been taught anything about the menstrual cycle and three quarters of children aren’t satisfied with the education on periods they receive. Typically, the details of the topic are often kept for when the boys have been scurried out the room and let outside early to play.

This evasive attitude towards period education is damaging for our society and the way in which girls and boys, and eventually women and men, interact. We think it’s high time that children are given the same level of education in all areas, including the menstrual cycle.

Understanding the science

One of the most obvious reasons period education is important for everyone regardless of gender is to gain a scientific understanding of how bodies work. Getting to grips with what the menstrual cycle is and knowing the implications of it. Understanding fertility, pregnancy and periods, will normalise what these are and what they mean. Teaching boys how periods and the menstrual cycle works helps them better understand the importance and practicalities of safe sex and contraception, which could help prevent unwanted pregnancies when they are older.

It will also better equip them for understanding problems and issues that can be experienced. For example, what period products are available, or how to reduce cramps. This will be handy when they will encounter periods directly and indirectly throughout their lives. Whether it be with family members, partners, colleagues or complete strangers – many of us menstruate! We don’t know about you, but boys knowing what they can do to help ease our pain or which period products we might need them to pick up from the store goes a long way in our books.

Reducing stigma

Ok, close your eyes for a second and imagine a world where periods weren’t a taboo. Did you see it? Was it bliss? For as long as we can remember, periods have been a punchline for the boys in school, and if you’re really unlucky, men in our adult lives also view periods with disgust. Over 90% of girls worry about going to school during their time of the month. Contributing to this is boys who lack understanding of periods and resort to humour, poking fun at girls with period-related jokes and sniggers. These jokes might seem harmless, but they perpetuate shame in young girls. This can lead to girls missing school and sacrificing their education, potentially stunting their career opportunities and self-image.

Tearing down the stigma around periods starts with education. Teaching both boys and girls about the way periods work and opening the topic up for constructive discussion is essential for clearing any of the common misconceptions, like that they are gross or that girls are in control of their bleeding.

The environment

Period products are huge contributors to the tons of plastic waste created daily – one pack of conventional period pads contains the equivalent amount of plastic as 5 plastic bags! Educating boys about periods and the different types of period products available won’t just help to improve communication and beat the stigma, it could also help to save the planet. Discussing reusable or plastic free period product options in the classroom is something that is currently missing for girls as well as boys. As plastic waste becomes more of a pressing issue for our planet and its ecosystems, it should be made a priority to help girls understand what they’re putting in their bodies and landfill, and to help boys support girls in their fight for access to periods without plastic.

period products with the planet in mind

Natracare products are plastic free and compostable – made entirely from natural materials!

Find out more

Point proven

In some areas of the world, the point is being proved that involving boys in period education helps to remove stigma, better educate all genders, and build on the sense of solidarity. Not only are boys in Kenya already being taught about periods in full, they are also being trained to educate others on the topic, smashing the stigma at its core! Dandelion Africa is a non-profit providing support and education for girls and women through the engagement of over 3,000 boys and men on a variety of topics, including periods.

Do you think boys should learn more about periods? Let us know in the comments!

natracare.com

100% certified organic cotton & nothing else. Our super tampon without applicator is ideal for medium flow days. Tampon expands widthways. Plastic free tampons. No perfume, rayon or dyes. Totally Chlorine Free. Ingredients grown without toxic pesticides. Biodegradable & compostable. Buy now.

Organic Super Non-Applicator Tampons packshotOrganic Super Non-Applicator Tampon illustrationOrganic Super Non-Applicator Tampons product photo

Our super tampon without applicator is ideal for medium flow days. Tampon expands widthways.

  • Plastic free tampons
  • No perfume, rayon or dyes
  • Totally Chlorine Free
  • Ingredients grown without toxic pesticides
  • Biodegradable & compostable

Buy now

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Ingredients: Certified organic cotton

Wrapper: BPA-free widely recycled plastic

Packaging: Recycled cardboard

Absorbency: 9-12g

Available in packs of 10 or 20

Barcodes: 0782126191038 (10pcs), 0782126002006 (20pcs)

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Our super absorbency organic tampons are made with a rolled wadding of long-fibre organic cotton – designed to gently absorb menstrual flow and expand widthways.

We only make organic tampons because most are made from a mix of rayon and non-organic cotton, and are commonly chlorine-bleached. Tampons often have a plastic wrapper, contain perfumes and even dyes. Rayon is a highly absorbent fibre which rapidly absorbs menstrual blood but at the same time can also dry out the natural protective mucous lining of the vagina.

No-one should be exposed to pesticide residues, phthalates, azo-dyes and dioxins, especially in such a sensitive and absorptive part of the body. Know exactly what you put in your body.

Non-applicator tampons are easier to use for some, it’s a matter of personal preference! If you have a retroverted uterus, inserting tampons can feel more uncomfortable using your hands. If you’re new to having periods, it might be worth trying both styles to see what works best for you and your period.

Non-applicator tampons are easy to use when you get the hang of it! With clean and dry hands, unwrap the tampon by tearing the coloured strip and pull the wrapper from both ends of the tampon. Do a quick safety tug on the tampon string to made sure it’s securely attached to the tampon. Now, hold your index finger to the base of the tampon, flaring the cotton a little.

With your other hand you might want to open the folds of skin around the vagina so you can push the tampon well into your vagina easily. Aim to push upwards and backwards towards the small of the back. If you can still feel the tampon, it might need pushing a little further inside. The tampon string should remain outside the vagina, easily accessible and ready for removal.

Video available with audio descriptions here

Always go for the lowest absorbency that you need. During your period, you may find you use different absorbencies because your flow is lighter at the beginning or end of your period.

It’s important to change your tampons regularly, every 4-6 hours, and alternate between using tampons and pads. It is not recommended that you wear a tampon when you are sleeping because you will most likely be leaving it in too long. Please read carefully the instruction leaflet found in the tampon packs for how to use tampons safely.

Natracare tampons are 100% cotton, meaning they are 100% compostable. Find out how to compost tampons here. If you don’t have access to compost at home, or aren’t comfortable doing this, we recommend disposing with your regular rubbish (ideally in a biodegradable bin liner). Don’t flush your tampons.

Want more information? Get in touch with us!

What is Hot Composting? (And How to Get Started)

29-10-2020 · Hot compost uses this to aid the process – it relies on an optimal microbial activity to help decompose organic matter at the right temperature. The result is you can end up with usable compost in around four weeks! What are the benefits of hot composting? A great benefit of hot composting is that it can take a much wider variety of food waste and compostable materials. If one of your goals ...

29-10-2020

Heard about hot composting but not sure what it is? It’s one form of composting, among many, which is particularly fast and efficient. Composting is amazing – it’s incredibly sustainable and helps keep soils healthy. Compost reduces waste otherwise destined for landfill and helps create rich material to grow food at home. So, what exactly is hot composting and how can you get started?

What is hot composting?

Hot composting is a much faster method of getting rid of organic waste compared to regular (cold bin) composting. Hot compost bins operate around temperatures between 40-65° Celsius.

Normal compost is usually noticeably warm as the process of microbes working to break things down releases thermal energy. Hot compost uses this to aid the process – it relies on an optimal microbial activity to help decompose organic matter at the right temperature. The result is you can end up with usable compost in around four weeks!

What are the benefits of hot composting?

A great benefit of hot composting is that it can take a much wider variety of food waste and compostable materials. If one of your goals is to reduce the level of waste your household produces this is a great option for increasing your sustainability footprint. Other benefits of hot-style composting include:

  • You can compost all year round – the seasons won’t hold you back
  • It creates compost quickly compared to other methods
  • A larger variety of food waste and organic material can be composted
  • The heat can kill off seeds from weeds, pathogens, and unwelcome bacteria
  • Hot composting isn’t as smelly as some other types of composting

What’s the best way to hot compost?

You’ll need a compost bin, or designated area ready to fill with organic waste in your garden or allotment. It’s best to start with all your biodegradable material chopped up and broken into smaller bits. This allows all the material to break down evenly and quickly. Also, add in a good amount of existing ready compost as a starter, it will have the microorganisms and bacteria you need to really get your compost going.

Get a compost thermometer! It’s good practice to monitor the temperature of your hot compost pile. If your compost gets too cold (below 40° C) OR it gets too hot (over 75° C) – the speed of decomposition will slow right down.

When it drops below forty, turn and mix your compost and add some water. This adds oxygen and helps reinvigorate the microbial activity in your compost. After a couple of days, you should notice things are heating back up. If it gets too hot, add more water and carbon rich materials like wood and card. Don’t turn or mix until the temperature falls back within the desired range.

The temperature of your hot composts will always depend on moisture levels, the size of your organic matter, and the size of your pile. You can experiment with different batches, adding more water and making things smaller or bigger and see the impact this has on the quality of the resulting compost.

What can you put in a hot compost bin?

To get good compost resulting in that thick, dark brown, crumbly texture, which is ready to start growing with, you need a good balance of green and brown organic waste. Hot composting has a greater capacity for types of waste as the temperature can kill harmful pathogens or unwanted seeds from weeds.

Don’t fret too much over what you put in – the good news is that anything organic will break down, eventually. You can find out about different types of compostable green and brown waste here, but there is plenty more which can be composted!

Compost your tampons?

Natracare products are made from only natural materials and zero plastic, which means you can even hot compost your period products!

Find out more

You can’t really go wrong with composting; it’s an amazing natural process and you will always end up with the same result – only the time it takes and the richness of your compost may vary.

There are many other types of composting which we haven’t mentioned in this post, these include vermicomposting, wormery composting and Bokashi composting.

All our pads, tampons, panty liners and wipes are suitable for hot composting! Take a look at our compostable products.

Periods After Miscarriage: What to Expect

05-05-2021 · You can usually expect your first period 4-6 weeks after a miscarriage. If you still haven’t had yours by this time it’s a good idea to contact a healthcare professional, especially if your cycle was regular before pregnancy. There are a few factors that may impact how long it takes for your period to return, including:

05-05-2021

If you’re recovering from a recent pregnancy loss, your mind and body have been through a lot and it may take some time to readjust. It might help to have some understanding of what to expect from your body during this time, including your period. Here’s what to expect from your first period after miscarriage:

When will I get my first period after pregnancy loss?

You can usually expect your first period 4-6 weeks after a miscarriage. If you still haven’t had yours by this time it’s a good idea to contact a healthcare professional, especially if your cycle was regular before pregnancy. There are a few factors that may impact how long it takes for your period to return, including:

  • How regular your periods have been in the past – if your cycle is usually irregular, it’s likely to remain this way. This might mean that it can take longer than the average 4-6 weeks to resume.
  • How far along you were in the pregnancy – getting your period back will depend on your HCG levels HCG increases the further into your pregnancy you are (up to 12 weeks), so periods after an early miscarriage may return sooner than after a later miscarriage.

It’s important to note that while you might have a period within six weeks, it can take longer than this for the regularity of your cycle to return. Your hormones change a lot while you’re pregnant and they’ll need some time to return to your usual cycle.

What will my first period after a miscarriage be like?

Your first period after a miscarriage might be different to the periods you’re used to. Common changes you might notice in this first period could include:

  • Heavier bleeding
  • A longer period
  • More painful than usual
  • Some discharge with an odour

After around 2-3 cycles your period should return to what was normal for you before you were pregnant. If it doesn’t, and you continue to have heavy periods or an irregular menstrual cycle after a miscarriage, be sure to check in with a healthcare professional.

Will PMS be different after a miscarriage?

After a pregnancy loss, your hormones can fluctuate significantly. This and the emotional impact of experiencing a miscarriage can both mean that PMS symptoms may be more intense than you’re used to.

During this time, it’s important to keep an eye on how you’re feeling in yourself. Seek help if you think your pain might be cause for concern or you might have depression or anxiety. Grief affects all of us differently and it’s important to get emotional support. A healthcare professional can point you to support services available and help you to explore the options available. Here is some advice from the NHS on getting support after a miscarriage.

Ovulation after miscarriage

When your period resumes after a pregnancy loss so does the rest of your menstrual cycle, often including ovulation. This means that if you don’t want to get pregnant, you should use contraception when having sex. If you do want to get pregnant, it’s a good idea to speak to a healthcare professional about how you’re feeling physically and emotionally before trying for to get pregnant after a miscarriage.

Some people may not ovulate on their first period after a miscarriage, which may make PMS more painful than you’re used to. This is because when you don’t ovulate, the endometrial lining becomes thicker, causing a heavier, more painful period.

Above all, it’s important to take some time to be gentle with and look after yourself. Your experiences and feelings are valid, and you’re not alone. If you need help processing or understanding what’s happened or what comes next, speak to your healthcare provider and they will be able to guide you or tell you about organisations that can help.

Do you have anything to add about your own experience that may help someone else? Tell us in the comments if you feel comfortable.

How to Stop Breastfeeding - AKA Weaning

11-08-2020 · Mothers sometimes feel a sense of grief and loss when they stop breastfeeding – it’s an emotional time to no longer be connected to your child in that way. Go easy on yourself, access support, whatever that looks like for you, and take your time. There are plenty of other ways to be connected to your little one. Pick your timing. Stopping breastfeeding can be stressful, so make sure that ...

11-08-2020

Breastfeeding, if you choose to do it, can be a very rewarding and bonding experience. A moment of quiet in an otherwise busy day, the exchange of the bonding hormone oxycontin, the opportunity to look down at your child’s face and see contentment… perfection.

You might feel like you’ve learnt all there is to know about breastfeeding. However, at some point, your breastfeeding journey will come to an end. It can be an emotional time, but also an exciting one, as you watch your little one take their first step into independence. So, what do you do when you want to stop breastfeeding? We’ve gathered some advice below:

baby with tongue out

When should I stop breastfeeding?

As with so many things to do with parenting (and life!), there is no right or wrong answer. Every child is different and when to stop breastfeeding depends on so many factors, i.e. is breastfeeding enjoyable and easy for you? Is your little one already eating solid food? How frequently are they feeding from you? There are lots of questions to consider.

You may have practical reasons for deciding to stop, such as going back to work, or if you’ve become pregnant again. Or you may be experiencing physical problems while feeding your child, such as painful nipples or thrush.

The World Health Organisation recommends that you breastfeed until your child is at least six months old, and suggests that you carry on up until they are two. Of course, this might not be possible for a number of reasons, and each parent will make their own decision about when to stop.

If you’re keen to carry on breastfeeding but you feel that you don’t have enough support, reach out to your health visitor or another breastfeeding specialist in your community. They will be able to provide practical advice about overcoming difficulties, and information on where you can meet other breastfeeding mums.

baby being fed with spoon

Moving onto solid food

Once they’re eating solids, your child will still need to have breast milk or formula as their main drink until they’re at least one year old. It’s important that solid food doesn’t just replace breast milk. There’s evidence that breast milk may play a part in helping the digestive system deal with solid food.

It’s also possible to give your child a mixture of breast milk and formula, rather than one or the other. This can be a great solution if the primary breast feeder is returning to work, there can be a balance of being able to breastfeed or having formula on hand.

Check with your health visitor about what is best for you, though – all children are different.

Weaning Slowly

Babies breastfeed not only when they’re hungry, but also when they are seeking comfort. Weaning them off breast milk slowly will help to make the transition as smooth as possible. Not only for your child, but for your body, too. Stopping too quickly can sometimes lead to engorged breasts. This can sometimes lead to mastitis, which is an inflammation of breast tissue.

If for some reason you do need to stop breastfeeding suddenly, you can use a pump to make sure that you’re still expressing milk and that your breasts aren’t becoming engorged or painful.

Mothers sometimes feel a sense of grief and loss when they stop breastfeeding – it’s an emotional time to no longer be connected to your child in that way. Go easy on yourself, access support, whatever that looks like for you, and take your time. There are plenty of other ways to be connected to your little one.

woman holding baby

Pick your timing

Stopping breastfeeding can be stressful, so make sure that you pick the right time. If your child is ill, or is just recovering from illness, they might be needier than usual – and also might benefit from the nutrients from breast milk more than usual.

Equally, if you’re going through something stressful in your own life, it might not be the right time to introduce this major change. It can be stressful to know that your little one is craving a feed, and your resilience might be lower if you’re already stressed, so you might find yourself giving in and breastfeeding them anyway, which will prolong the process and send mixed messages.

No matter how you plan to stop breastfeeding, or when you plan to do it, there is plenty of support available. You can find a UK directory here – and there are similar lists for other countries, too.

Do you have any tips for stopping breastfeeding? Let us know in the comments below.

Applicator vs Non-Applicator Tampon: Which Is Right For ...

13-12-2018 · Applicator tampons are exactly the same as non-applicator tampons but instead of inserting the tampon directly with your fingers, they come with either a plastic or cardboard applicator designed to help with insertion. Pros. Applicator tampons help to do the hard work by pushing the tampon in for you. They’re arguably more comfortable and ...

13-12-2018

Pads, panty liners, cups, cloth pads… there are plenty of period products out there to choose from. If you’ve picked tampons as your menstrual management companion, you’ve got another choice to make; applicator or non-applicator tampons or switch?

Before we go into the ins and outs of using the two types of tampons, have you thought about these questions?

  • Do you know what absorbency level you need? Using one that has a higher level of absorbency than you need can not only be uncomfortable, but can increase the risk of TSS. We can safely say that that’s not something you want to risk getting. Always go for the lowest possible absorbency to match your flow.
  • How well do you know your body? Everyone’s vagina is different. What works for people you know might not necessarily work for you. Bear this in mind when it comes to your period products.
  • Have you researched how tampons work and how to use them? Once you dive a little deeper into the technicalities of tampons, you might be overwhelmed by the idea of using them or suddenly want to switch from one tampon style to another?
  • Which brand will you choose? We’re not trying to be overly bias but ours are made from 100% organic cotton, are biodegradable and compostable – better for the environment and your body!

Once you think you’ve given it some thought, it’s time to check out the pros and cons of both applicator and non-applicator tampons…

Should I use non-applicator tampons?

Non-applicator tampons are inserted into your vagina using your fingers as a guide.

Pros

  • Non-applicator tampons are the more affordable choice between the two, you’ll save yourself a little money every cycle.
  • Non-applicator tampons are much smaller and easier to carry around.
  • Being smaller means less packaging and waste, which is more environmentally friendly, especially if you’re using biodegradable, organic cotton tampons.
  • You’re in total control of how a non-applicator tampon goes into your vagina, and can adjust how it sits based on what the most comfortable spot for you is.

Cons

  • Using a tampon without an applicator is messier as you use your finger to insert. It has got to go right inside your vagina for it to fit in properly, meaning more blood gets on your hands.
  • It takes a little bit more time and practise to familiarise yourself with your body to get a non-applicator tampon in smoothly. This can be seen as good practice getting comfortable with your body.

Should I use applicator tampons?

Applicator tampons are exactly the same as non-applicator tampons but instead of inserting the tampon directly with your fingers, they come with either a plastic or cardboard applicator designed to help with insertion.

Pros

  • Applicator tampons help to do the hard work by pushing the tampon in for you. They’re arguably more comfortable and easier to use!
  • If you’re new to tampons, using applicators is a safe way to know your tampon will be pushed in properly and securely.
  • Using applicator tampons can be less messy as the applicator deals with the blood, rather than your finger.

Cons

  • Applicator tampons are larger and use more materials, this means that there will be more waste overall.
  • Applicator tampons tend to be more expensive because they are manufactured using more materials and the applicator accessory.
  • Did you know about 20% of vaginas have a naturally retroverted uterus (where the uterus tilts backwards towards the spine instead of forwards)? Using an applicator can be more painful and inflexible to insert if you have one.
  • If your tampon feels uncomfortable, readjusting the position means you’ll have to use your fingers, which makes the point of using an applicator tampon redundant.

There is no right or wrong style tampon to choose. An applicator is a great starter for using tampons if you’re a beginner to them or you’re just starting your period. There’s still a learning curve but it’s definitely easier to get to grips with.

If you’re thinking more consciously about your consumption, and are no stranger the realities of period blood, then a non-applicator tampon will be the right fit for you. You might also feel easy about which tampon type you want to use and switch it up to whatever is available!

Whichever style tampon you choose, make sure you have clean hands and take a minute to feel calm and comfortable before putting one in. Read this guide on how to put tampons in (with handy videos!).

organic non-applicator tampons

Inserting a tampon

Once you’ve selected your tampon of choice, it’s important to make sure you know how to use your tampon properly. Firstly, wash your hands thoroughly with soap to avoid getting unwanted bacteria in or near your vagina. Then get into the best position to put your tampon in. Check out the rest of our guide on how to put a tampon in and prevent leaks.

Removing a tampon

You should change your tampon every 4-6 hours to maintain good period hygiene and reduce the risk of getting Toxic Shock Syndrome. When you’re ready to take your tampon out, go to the bathroom and wash your hands, and simply pull gently on the tampon string until the tampon is out. Remember to never flush your tampons, dispose of them in your bathroom waste bin instead!

Don’t be ashamed to talk to family or friends about your period – we all have them! They might have some words of wisdom or funny stories to share that’ll help with your choice. Or you can always message us on Facebook or Instagram if you have any period-related questions.

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