Why Do Cats Lick You?- VyWhy

Last updated on 2022-03-29 19:02:15

2022-03-18

Is licking behaviour in cats normal? And what to do if your cat lick you? Read to find out the health and social reasons for grooming, safety concerns and some some frequently asked questions.

It can feel uncomfortable when your cat licks your bare skin due to the backward-facing barbs on a cat’s tongue.

Our dog companions are well-known for licking people, but what about cats? Cat parents often complain of their cats licking their fingers, their feet, or even their hair.

The sensation is generally not pleasant because of the barbs on a cat’s tongue, which make things quite rough. So why do cats lick people? It turns out that there are a variety of reasons.

Normal Licking Behavior In Cats

We first need to identify what is normal versus abnormal licking behavior for a cat. Cats are some of the most fastidious groomers out there. In fact, they are so good at it that most pet cats rarely, if ever, need a bath if they are in good health. Grooming serves a variety of functions for a cat’s health and well-being.

Health Reasons for Grooming:

  • Grooming keeps the coat clean and dry.
  • It spreads around natural oils from the cat’s skin, conditioning the coat.
  • Grooming removes parasites. Cats are so good at this that it can be tough to find evidence of certain parasites, like fleas. We often have to look for things like flea dirt, instead of the actual fleas, to confirm their presence.
  • Licking also has a cooling function. Cats do not sweat and they also do not pant like dogs to dissipate heat (cats panting can be a sign of severe distress or illness). Licking applies moisture to the coat and when that evaporates it provides a cooling effect for the cat.

Social Reasons for Grooming:

  • One cat licking one another is called allogrooming. This is a much more common behavior among familiar cats than strangers. Seeing this behavior between cats in a household provides insight into the social relationships between them. It most commonly happens around the head, neck, and ears. Cats have been observed allogrooming other species, including dogs, horses, and rabbits, among others.
  • Licking provides scent distribution between cats. Scent is a crucial way that cats identify other members of their social group. That scent distribution can also help form and strengthen social bonds between the cats or between the cat and another animal.

Safety Concerns

Don’t let your cat lick lotions or creams from your skin as the ingredients in these might be dangerous for cats.

Even if your cat is licking you for normal reasons, it has the potential to be a nuisance or even dangerous. The scent of products used on your hair or skin could attract your cat and entice them to lick you. Ingredients in those products are not always safe for cats or could cause irritation to their gastrointestinal system.

Two common ingredients found in certain topical creams that are toxic to cats are NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications) and estrogen. It is important to be extra aware of your cat having access to potentially lick these products and prevent that from happening.

Cats sometimes lick hair and swallow it. This is also a concern because hair can accumulate in the intestinal tract and lead to urinary blockage.

Licking could be a sign of a gastrointestinal problem, which is not uncommon in cats. From the mental health perspective, licking can be an attention-seeking behavior or even a behavior performed due to anxiety or stress. Anxiety and stress are the least common reasons for licking so ruling out other possibilities is always the best place to start.

Also Read: 5 Visual Signs of a Stressed Cat and How to Help

As with any behavior, when there is a sudden change or it is performed with excessive frequency or intensity, it can be an indication of something else going on. In that case, the first stop should be to your veterinarian’s office to make sure your cat is in good health.

What To Do If Your Cat Licks You

If your cat is licking you too much, provide more toys and activities to help engage your cat in a healthier way.

If you want to stop your cat from licking you, the best approach is to become incredibly boring. That may sound silly, but this approach works very well. The reason is that a lot of cat behaviors are inadvertently reinforced by their family members which causes the behavior to happen more often.

Pushing your cat away, petting them, and talking to them can all be rewarding to your cat. On the other hand, unpleasant punishments can also make the problem worse. Things like yelling at your cat, using a spray bottle, or any type of physical reprimand have been shown to potentially lead to aggression and should never be used.

Being very boring is typically more effective. That means completely disengaging from your cat when they start licking you. Often, the best way to do this is to get up and walk away without looking at, speaking to, or touching your cat every time that they start to lick you.

Cats are very quick learners and it should not take long before they figure out that licking you does not get them any form of attention.

Remember that licking is a variation of a normal behavior for cats. Oral behaviors such as licking, chewing, and sucking are natural way for cats to explore the world around them. Ensuring that your cat has plenty of outlets for both physical and mental activity can go a long way to reducing unwanted behaviors like licking.

Enrichment Options to Reduce Licking

The term enrichment comes up over and over again when discussing undesirable behaviors and creating the best quality of life for pet cats. There is a good reason for that—it works!

Any enrichment is good, but in the case of licking it may be most helpful to give them appropriate options to use their mouths. Food puzzle toys are very popular and there is almost no limit to both products for sale and do-it-yourself options available.

Feeding puzzles get your cat thinking and problem solving. They can get your cat moving around more, and they also allow cats a good place to focus licking or other oral behaviors.

Food puzzles aren’t the only options, though. Cats may like chewing on safe plants like cat grass. Chew sticks are available made of silver vine or other woods that cats like. Even soft chew bones designed for puppies can be enjoyable for some cats. Be sure to supervise your cat with these items to make sure they don’t try to swallow them whole or in pieces.

That depends. If the licking does not bother you and it does not happen too often or for too long, it may be OK. However, it is very easy for licking to become a way of seeking attention and get out of hand. In some cases, for example when certain products are present on the skin, licking that can be dangerous for your cat. It's best if you can redirect your cat to a more desirable activity.

It can be, or at least a sign that your cat sees you as a member of their social group. It is not the only reason a cat may lick you.

This doesn’t always happen for the same reason. Licking can be an appeasement behavior, meaning that it helps defuse tension. This could be the reason that a cat licks someone after biting them. You may also see the opposite, where a cat licks first and then bites. Sometimes social interaction gets to be too much or too intense for a cat and they bite as a way to stop that. If you pet your cat while they are licking you, this is more likely to happen.

View Sources

https://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/poisoning-toxicity/c_ct_hormone_replacement_poisoning_in_cats

https://www.aspca.org/news/topical-creams-can-pose-danger-pets

How Much Does A Cat X-Ray Cost?

17-12-2021 · How Much Does a Cat X-Ray Cost? The cost of a series of x-rays is highly variable, depending on your region, but you can expect to pay 0-300 for a series of 2-3 x-rays. Emergency clinics may charge up to 0. If sedation or anesthesia is required for the x-rays, this will be an additional fee.

17-12-2021

cat being prepared for x-ray

We all expect human hospitals to have x-ray machines, but did you know most veterinary clinics have x-rays machines as well? X-rays (or radiographs) are a very important diagnostic tool to help veterinary teams determine what health problems your kitty has.

When most pet owners think of x-rays, they think of broken bones, such as broken ribs. Assessing fractures is one important use for radiographs when it comes to cat health, but there is so much more they can tell us.

Radiographs are useful in diagnosing many conditions, including heart disease, pneumonia, intestinal obstructions, bladder stones, arthritis, and certain types of cancer.

What Is A Cat Radiograph?

A cat radiograph is a two-dimensional picture of a three-dimensional object. By taking two or more views, we get a more complete picture. The most common views are a lateral view, which is the kitty laying on one side, and a ventrodorsal view (VD), with the kitty laying on his back. Together, these images give us a more complete picture of what is going on inside.

In the days when x-rays were taken on film, most veterinary clinics charged per x-ray. Now that most radiographs are processed digitally, you will likely be charged per “study”. A study is a series of x-rays focusing on a specific area of the body and usually consists of two to three x-rays.

The types of studies commonly done on cats are listed below:

  • Orthopedic –this study is assessing a specific area of the skeleton. It may be a joint, a leg, or the spine. Orthopedic radiographs are used to look for injuries, such as bone fractures or dislocations, arthritis in a joint, improper development of a joint such as hip dysplasia, overall bone health, assess fracture healing, and to look for certain types of cancer or fungal infections that affect bone. If multiple areas of the skeleton need to be radiographed, each area is considered a different study. For example, if your veterinarian wants to assess both elbows and the hips, this would be three series.
  • Thoracic – the thorax is the chest. Chest x-ray assesses the heart and lungs. Your veterinarian may be looking for signs of heart disease, lung infections, asthma, tumors, or metastatic spread of cancer. The trachea and esophagus are also evaluated with this series.
  • Abdominal – this study evaluates the internal organs between the diaphragm and the pelvis. Abdominal x-rays are probably the most common series taken in our feline friends because of all the different conditions it helps us assess. Abdominal radiographs can show an intestinal obstruction, the size and health of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, find bladder stones, foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract, and make some abdominal masses visible.
  • Skull – most cats need to be sedated or anesthetized for these x-rays to be successful. These radiographs may be indicated to look for signs of polyps in the inner ear, tumors in the bones of the skull or nasal passages, and assess fractures.
  • Catogram – some cats are small enough that both their chest and abdomen will fit on the same x-ray plate. Radiologists will tell you that catograms are not ideal, that the focus should only be either on the chest or the abdomen, not both. This is because x-rays travel through the chest and abdomen differently and the settings need to be adjusted to get the best detail depending on the area of focus. However, in some emergency situations, or if cost is a concern, many general practitioners in an animal hospital will resort to catograms.
cat lying at the veterinarian's office

Veterinary radiologists have an additional three years of training to read radiographs, ultrasounds, CTs, and MRIs where they are trained to pick up subtle details general veterinarians may miss.

How Much Does a Cat X-Ray Cost?

The cost of a series of x-rays is highly variable, depending on your region, but you can expect to pay 0-300 for a series of 2-3 x-rays. Emergency clinics may charge up to 0. If sedation or anesthesia is required for the x-rays, this will be an additional fee.

The images are usually interpreted by the veterinarian who ordered the x-rays. However, thanks to digital radiographs, the x-ray images can be shared with a veterinary radiologist for consultation and interpretation.

Veterinary radiologists have an additional three years of training to read radiographs, ultrasounds, CTs, and MRIs. They are trained to pick up subtle details general veterinarians may miss through blood work. A radiologist consult will add on an additional 0-0 to the cost of x-rays, depending on how quickly the veterinarian wants the radiographs to read and which consulting group they use.

Some clinics, such as the emergency clinic in my area, submit all radiographs for consultation and the consultation cost is already incorporated into the cost of the series.

Your veterinarian may recommend other types of x-rays beyond the studies listed above. One fairly common test is a barium series. Your kitty swallows liquid barium and radiographs are taken throughout the day.

The barium outlines the gastrointestinal tract so that the veterinarian can get a better look at the inside of various structures. Barium can outline tumors within the stomach and intestines, foreign bodies, and ulcerations.

It can also be useful to diagnose an intestinal obstruction in the cat’s body. The barium series has been replaced by ultrasound in many practices, but it is still a good diagnostic tool used by many practitioners.

Because of the amount of time and number of x-rays required for a barium series, the cost is often at least double the cost of an abdominal study.

Does My Pet Insurance Cover X -Rays?

X-rays are considered a diagnostic test and are generally included in the accident or illness coverage for most pet insurance plans. Trupanion, our top-recommended pet insurance company, covers diagnostic tests for both unexpected illnesses and injuries related to accidents. With a Trupanion plan, you’ll likely be reimbursed for 90% of covered x-ray expenses. Get a free quote for Trupanion here.

What About Dental Radiographs?

Dental radiographs are an important part of a proper oral health exam. The veterinarian uses dental x-rays to evaluate tooth roots and surrounding tissue below the gum line. Dental radiographs require a different type of x-ray machine, very similar to the machine your dentist likely uses.

veterinarians performing xray on a cat

There is so much variability with dental treatments, so it’s the best that you ask your veterinarian for an estimate of the cost.

The x-ray plate needs to be inside the cat’s mouth so anesthesia is absolutely necessary. To see all the teeth in a cat’s mouth, it takes six to twelve small radiographs. Dental radiographs are only part of the oral health exam and are usually done in conjunction with a dental cleaning under general anesthesia.

There is so much variability with dental treatments that I recommend you ask your veterinarian for an estimate of the cost.

Radiographs are a very important diagnostic tool. On average, you can expect to pay 0-0, maybe more or less depending on where you live, whether it is an emergency, and how many studies your cat needs.

Good radiographs help your veterinarian to make a more accurate diagnosis and treatment plan for your kitty.

Oftentimes, the veterinary team does not need to sedate a cat for x-rays. X-rays are so quick and the patient only needs to be held in position for a few seconds so sedation isn't required. However, this also depends on the cat's temperament. Some cats will not tolerate being restrained, even for a few seconds. With these cats, sedation is often required for the safety of both your cat and the veterinary team.

Sedation may also be necessary if the kitty is open mouth breathing due to severe respiratory issues. A mild sedative may be given to help the patient relax without affecting his ability to breathe.

Sedation may also be advised if the patient is in a lot of pain. Broken bones are often extremely painful. Your veterinarian may want to sedate your kitty to obtain good quality x-rays that will help determine the extent of the injury and the proper treatment plan.

X-rays are not painful and the amount of radiation your cat is exposed to during an x-ray is not enough to cause any pain or permanent damage. Many cats do not like x-rays because they have to lay on their backs or on their side, but they are not painful. If there is a broken leg, it may be painful when the x-ray technician pulls on the leg. In these cases, sedation and pain medication are usually given prior to the x-ray.

This all depends on your cat's overall health. Many cats go their whole lives without ever needing an x-ray. Cats with certain health problems may get x-rays more frequently.

For example, if your cat has bladder stones, he may need x-rays every two to four weeks until the stones are completely dissolved, then every six months to year to see if any additional stones have developed. A cat with a splint from a broken bone may get x-rays every few weeks until it is completely healed.

An x-ray is very quick. Once the cat is in the proper position, the machine releases x-ray beams for less than a second. Depending on the type of x-ray processor, the x-rays are available for view anywhere from one to fifteen minutes.

Fluoxetine For Cats: Overview, Dosage & Side Effects

29-12-2021 · Fluoxetine can have interactions with many medications, especially other anxiety medications, sedatives, and some pain medications. Some drug interactions, especially when …

29-12-2021

Fluoxetine For Cats

Fluoxetine, also commonly known by the brand name Prozac, is a medication commonly used in veterinary medicine to treat behavioral disorders, including inappropriate urination, in cats.

In this article, you’ll learn how fluoxetine works, situations where it is often prescribed, potential side effects and drug interactions, and some frequently asked questions.

logo

Medication Type:

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitior (SSRI)

Form:

Chewable tablets, oral tablets, oral capsules, oral solution.

Prescription Required?:

Yes

FDA Approved?:

Not for cats (Reconcile is FDA approved for dogs)

Brand Names:

Reconcile, Prozac

Available Dosages:

Reconcile tablets: 8mg, 16mg, 32mg, 64mg. Generic oral tablets: 10mg, 20mg. Generic oral capsules: 10mg, 20mg, 40mg, 90mg. Generic oral solution: 4mg/ml in 120ml and 473ml.

Expiration Range:

Products should be used before the expiration on the package. Tablets and capsules may be stored at room temperature (68-77 degrees F) (20-25 degrees C). The oral liquid should also be stored at room temperature.

About Fluoxetine For Cats

Fluoxetine is classified as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant.

Serotonin is a principal hormone in the body that acts as a neurotransmitter in the brain. It is the main transmitter involved with stabilizing mood, well-being, and happiness.

SSRIs act to increase serotonin levels in the brain by preventing its reuptake or reabsorption, keeping it in circulation.

Fluoxetine is very selective in that it has little effect on other neurotransmitters in the brain, primarily just serotonin.

What Does Fluoxetine Do For Cats?

Generally, fluoxetine may be used for a variety of behavioral disorders, including aggression, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, separation anxiety, and inappropriate elimination.

Cats are very complex creatures, as all kitty parents know, and they can exhibit some very odd behaviors interacting with their human counterparts as well as other pets in the home.

It is important to rule out medical causes of unusual behaviors, like underlying pain as a cause of erratic behavior or aggression, or infection, bladder stones, or sterile inflammation as a cause of unwanted urinary behavior.

But generally, if medical causes have been eliminated, and some non-prescription behavioral approaches may have been tried, fluoxetine is often a first choice for many behavioral conditions in cats. This is especially true for cases of inappropriate urination.

Side Effects Of Fluoxetine For Cats

Side Effects Of Fluoxetine For Cats

While many cats may experience improved, calm behavior as desired, rarely cats may exhibit worsening behavior changes like anxiety, hyperactivity, irritability and difficulty sleeping.

In cats, fluoxetine can have a number of potential adverse effects.

The most commonly reported effects can be drowsiness and a decrease in appetite.

While many cats may experience improved, calm behavior as desired, rarely cats may exhibit worsening behavior changes like anxiety, hyperactivity, irritability, difficulty sleeping, and undesired changes in elimination patterns.

Cats can also develop GI side effects like poor appetite, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. All potential side effects are not universal, but vary greatly from cat to cat in terms of what may occur and to what degree.

Fluoxetine can have interactions with many medications, especially other anxiety medications, sedatives, and some pain medications. Some drug interactions, especially when fluoxetine is used with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) like selegiline, may lead to serotonin syndrome, which is described more fully below. Always make your veterinarian aware of any other medications your cat is taking.

If your cat uses a flea/tick collar, make sure to discuss this with your vet prior to starting fluoxetine.

Fluoxetine should be used with caution in diabetic patients, as its use with insulin may alter insulin requirements. It may be a common recommendation after starting fluoxetine in a diabetic cat, to have blood glucose levels rechecked to see if any adjustments need to be made.

Fluoxetine is primarily metabolized by the liver, and so should be used cautiously in any cat with chronic or advanced liver disease.

Overdoses of fluoxetine can be very concerning. While increasing serotonin in the body can be helpful with some behavioral disorders, increasing it too much can lead to severe side effects including vomiting, excessive drooling, diarrhea, agitation, tremors, and seizures. This is called serotonin syndrome and requires immediate veterinary care if it occurs.

If you are ever concerned that your kitty may have developed side effects while taking fluoxetine, or if you think an overdose or medication interaction may have occurred, make sure to contact your veterinarian, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435), or Pet Poison Helpline (1-855-764-7661) for further advice.

Fluoxetine For Cats Dosage

Fluoxetine For Cats Dosage

Fluoxetine is generally dosed once daily and when first started should be continued for at least 4 to 8 weeks as long as no concerning side effects are seen.

While fluoxetine is labeled for use in dogs as the brand Reconcile, there is no FDA approved product for cats, so it is used in an extra-label manner in kitties.

Starting doses for cats tend to be low and this medication has a narrow margin of safety, so a dosage for your cat is best determined by your cat’s attending veterinarian.

Doses as low as 15-20mg for an average 10 lb cat have demonstrated signs of toxicity, so under no circumstances should a human dose of Prozac be shared with a cat in the home.

Fluoxetine is generally dosed once daily and when first started should be continued for at least 4 to 8 weeks as long as no concerning side effects are seen, to fully determine if the drug is working to address a behavioral problem.

It is extremely important to not discontinue this medication abruptly. If your cat is exhibiting signs of undesired behavior or side effects, make sure to contact your veterinarian first. If your cat has been on fluoxetine for several weeks and no improvements have been seen, it is very important to contact your vet to discuss, as weaning a kitty slowly off the medication is typical when looking to discontinue it.

It’s helpful to note that because cats require smaller doses of fluoxetine, that having the medication ordered through a compounding pharmacy, sometimes in a small treat or liquid form, is common. It’s important to be aware that the transdermal (skin application) form has been found in studies to be much less effective however for proper dosing.

Conclusion

Fluoxetine can be a very helpful and effective medication for treating cats for a variety of behavioral disorders, including inappropriate urination. But because side effects and drug interactions can occur, and because overdoses can be concerning, it’s very important for fluoxetine to only be used for cats when appropriately prescribed by an attending veterinarian.

Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). It works by keeping serotonin levels higher in the body, which can help to improve mood and a sense of well-being.

Drugs like fluoxetine can take a long time to reach their peak level of effectiveness. When starting fluoxetine it is possible to see behavioral improvements in as little as 1-2 weeks, but it is common to continue a cat on it for at least 4-8 weeks to fully assess its effect on a behavioral problem.

Whenever starting a drug like fluoxetine, it is important to be patient and not expect immediate results, but to carefully monitor your cat for slow, steady improvements. If you haven’t seen any improvements in an undesired behavior after 4 weeks, it is appropriate to update your veterinarian.

Make sure to never abruptly discontinue fluoxetine or any other behavioral medication, even if you think it may not be helping. It’s important to contact your vet first to determine the best way to discontinue it or transition to a different medication if desired.

Fluoxetine is safe for use in a majority of cats when prescribed by a veterinarian and dosed appropriately. As with any medication, side effects are always possible. Mild ones seen more commonly may include drowsiness and a decrease in appetite. When discussed with your vet, a simple medication adjustment may help. More concerning side effects or undesired behavioral effects tend to be much less common. 

Overdoses or interactions with other medications may lead to serotonin syndrome, which can cause serious signs of illness. This most often occurs with accidental overdoses or if a human dosage equivalent of fluoxetine is given.

If you are ever concerned that your kitty may have developed side effects from use of fluoxetine, or if you think an overdose or medication interaction may have occurred, make sure to contact your veterinarian, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435), or Pet Poison Helpline (1-855-764-7661) for further advice. 

A cat can stay on fluoxetine for life if needed. However, any behavioral medication should be given in light of both its continued necessity as well as other behavioral modification approaches.

If a stressor in the home, such as another pet or housing situation, which was the source of a cat’s undesired behaviors, has been resolved, a cat may no longer require this medication, or the dosage may be adjusted. 

While training and behavioral modification is trickier for cats as compared to many dogs, products like Feliway and other approaches like litter box number and strategic placement for inappropriately urinating cats, may reduce the need for medication.

This is why it is always very important to update your veterinarian with any changes in your cat's status or the perceived source of stress, if known. 

In many cases, a cat’s stressor may not be clear, but if it’s evident that a kitty is calmer and not exhibiting undesired behaviors while on fluoxetine, it is best to continue the medication as long as needed while the condition is being acceptably managed and no concerning side effects are being seen. 

Cat Exercise Wheel - All About Cats

Some of the pros and cons of the cat exercise wheel are listed below. Pros-Boosting of mental stimulation. Reduces disease chances of both the heart and respiratory system. Reduces behavioral issues, boredom and stress. improves cat mortality and flexibility of the muscles, increases the bone strength and improves blood circulation, improves ...

Our reviews are based on extensive research and, when possible, hands-on testing. Each time you make a purchase through one of our independently-chosen links, we’ll receive a percentage of the proceeds. Read more about how we’re supported here.

Do you have a cat as your very dear cat and wondering how to keep it busy at home?

Could it be that you have a small back yard which has provided a limited area for your cat in its exercise or movements? Have you visited the veterinary doctor and instructed you to keep exercising your cat as often as possible to avoid diseases and reduce loneliness while you are gone?

Just like in human beings where toddlers and young children receive much attention while they are young, our cat cats receive much attention too while they are kittens.

An example of this in human beings children have baby walkers to help them learn how to walk, and in cats too they have a cat harness with which they are taught how to make their initial steps and also restrict their movements in case of an outdoor walk .

But after they have learned walking, how do you improve their sprint speeds and keep them in good shape? Then worry no more because all these questions may seem different but their solution or answer will be sorted and solved by only one special and efficient equipment which is the cat exercise wheel.

The love for cats blended in with the ever increasing creativity in human beings to have comfortable and less worrying lives prompted this innovation. The cat exercise wheel is an indoor equipment where cats run, exercise and keeping the cat lively.

Why Buy A Cat Exercise Wheel

Most people keep cats at home as their cats either, since they feel lonely and want some company, or they just feel the love for cats. There is one undisputed fact, though you won’t carry your cat all along with you wherever.

The welfare of their cat makes some people worried about the health of their cats since they are not sure of their activities back home or they have no trust to whoever they leave their cats to. When cats are left alone, they too have feelings of solitude and loneliness and can suffer from depression and boredom.

The depression and boredom feelings manifest themselves in different ways which are mostly behavioural in a cats’ daily routine. These changes include destroying furniture or not using litter boxes. To avoid all this hustle of new furniture, less worry about your cat and health of the cat you so dearly love to buy him/her a cat exercise wheel to keep it busy, relaxed and calm.

Why Is It Important To Make Your Cat Exercise.

Just like human beings cats which take plenty of food and little or no exercise become, obese and vulnerable to diseases which include arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and liver problems. With an overweight cat, it will no longer be able to their favorite places or spots. A cat, therefore, has to exercise enough to reduce obesity problems and other related diseases.

  • The cat wheel exercise is very crucial in the fitness and stimulated related issues for the cat especially the indoor adult who stay indoors eat and go to sleep.
  • The nature of cats is hunting for food since they are predators, so they spend a lot of their time sleeping and grooming which prepares them for the next hunt. Here the cat exercise wheel comes in handy by enhancing its sprint and running skills from the daily activity.

Pros And Cons Of A Cat Exercising Wheel.

With such a diverse equipment its’ without a doubt that the advantages of such an ideal innovation will outweigh its disadvantages. Some of the pros and cons of the cat exercise wheel are listed below.

  • Pros-Boosting of mental stimulation
  • Reduces disease chances of both the heart and respiratory system.
  • Reduces behavioral issues, boredom and stress.
  • improves cat mortality and flexibility of the muscles, increases the bone strength and improves blood circulation, improves digestion and helps cut weight in your cats.
  • Cons-the cat is limited to only indoor exercising, and the exercise is monotonous

Conclusion

Just like human beings need daily or often exercise out cats and mostly cats which are indoor require training as well. It is, therefore, advisable to have such a piece of equipment in the house because anything which has more merits than its demerits its always worth having or trying out.

The Different Types Of Black And White Cat Coat Patterns

23-03-2022 · All black and white cats are considered bicolor, or piebald, cats. This classification encompasses all cats with one primary color coupled with any amount of white fur. The primary colors could be gray, cream, brown, and, most popularly, black. The term piebald can also refer to other animals including horses, birds, pigs, and even snakes.

23-03-2022

While black is the most common coat color for cats, our black and white friends aren’t hard to find. Bicolored cats appear in several cat breeds, and it’s also a common color combination for domestic mixed breeds.

You can’t identify a cat’s breed based solely on a black and white coat pattern, but those contrasting colors can tell you interesting information about the cat’s genetic makeup. If you look closely at different cats with black and white fur, you’ll see there are distinct differences in how the two colors present and where the patches are located on the body.

There are multiple different types of black and white cats, and we’re here to help identify those contrasting coat patterns

Bicolor Cat Facts

All black and white cats are considered bicolor, or piebald, cats. This classification encompasses all cats with one primary color coupled with any amount of white fur. The primary colors could be gray, cream, brown, and, most popularly, black. The term piebald can also refer to other animals including horses, birds, pigs, and even snakes.

Like all cat coat patterns, the black and white bicolor patterns are controlled by genetics. Bicolor coat patterns are present when the cat inherits at least one allele of the “white spotting gene.” As an incompletely dominant gene, the white spotting gene can present in different ways depending on how many dominant and recessive alleles a cat receives from its parents.

If there are two dominant white spotting alleles, for example, white fur will cover more than half of the cat’s body. One dominant and one recessive gene will likely give the cat more of an equal mix of white and dark fur.

Classifying bicolor coat patterns isn’t an exact science, but feline experts have created a white spotting scale to help identify different types of coat patterns.

  • Low-grade – less than 40% white
  • Medium-grade – 40%-60% white
  • High-grade – more than 60% white

The Cat Fanciers Association grades bicolor cats based on a scale of 1 to 10. A cat on the low end of the scale has no white spotting, and a 10 is completely white.

There is also a pattern related to the white spotting scale and where the white fur is located. In most cases, low-grade patterned cats have a few white markings on their chests or bellies. As the grade increases, the white fur spreads first to the front paws, then to the sides, and finally to the legs and face. Remember, however, this isn’t a set rule.

While you can easily find a bicolored cat at an animal shelter, cat breeders also plan pairings in hopes of having kittens with specific black and white patterns. The Turkish Van, British Shorthair, American Shorthair, Manx, and Turkish Angora are all breeds that include bicolor coat patterns in their breed standards.

Black And White Cat Coat Patterns

There is no way to exactly predict an unborn cat’s coat pattern, and how the bicolor pattern presents will always be affected by different genes. Differentiating between the different black and white coat patterns isn’t always exact, or easy, but here are basic descriptions of the most common markings and patterns.

Classified as low grade on the white spotting scale, a locket cat has only a small patch of white fur. These white-colored hairs can be arranged in a patch, spot, or a slim streak and are most often located on the cat’s chest.

This creates the illusion that the cat is wearing a locket necklace. A cat with a small white marking on its stomach may also be considered a locket cat.

These fancy felines are potentially the most popular when it comes to black and white cats. The white fur on the chest, belly, and paws makes the cat look like it’s wearing its best formal clothing.

Sometimes tuxies also have white on their faces. When identifying a tuxedo cat, remember that formal fashion comes in all colors. A cat doesn’t have to be black and white to be a tuxie. The coat pattern also presents in gray and white cats, and even tabby cats can have the tuxedo pattern.

While bicolor is often used as an umbrella term to classify all cats with two coat colors, a “true” bicolor is a cat with equal amounts of both white fur and whatever their other color is. These are the medium-grade cats on the white spotting scale. In most cases, the contrasting fur comes in patches and is equally distributed across the body.

Sometimes called a cow cat, or even a Dalmatian cat, the harlequin cat coat pattern is identified by smaller, random spots and patches of color over a white coat. The spots can cover most of the body, and there is no discernible pattern. These cats don’t have the uniform stripes or swirls of a tabby or large colored sections of the tuxedo.

Mask and mantel refers to a specific coat pattern where a cat has dark or colored fur around the eyes, ears, and forehead. The white fur usually starts at the nose and goes down the chin, neck, and chest. This creates the illusion that these cats are dressed for a masquerade ball. Some of these masked kitties also have a mantel, which looks like a colored cape over their shoulders and torso. A cat can have either a mask or a mantel, and some cats have both.

The cap and saddle coat patterns are similar to the mask and mantle. Instead of a full mask, a cat with a cap has a patch of colored fur that starts above the eyes. A saddle is also a smaller version of the mantle. This kind of patch doesn’t cover the cat’s shoulders and is positioned on the back as if the cat is wearing an actual saddle.

More Black And White Coat Patterns

Cat coat pattern isn’t exact, and it’s possible to find black and white cats with fur markings that don’t fit exactly into any of the above categories. They’re rare, but they exist. The van coat pattern, for example, is usually only seen in the Turkish Van cat breed or cats with that breed somewhere in their lineage.

These cats are mostly white and have small streaks or patches of black fur on their heads. Their tails are also usually black, but everywhere else is white. There are also “skunk” cats that have a white stripe down their spines.

According to Cat Fanciers Association, black and white cats also get their coat patterns from an illness or health condition. Vitiligo, for example, is a condition that causes a loss of pigmentation usually on the feet and face.

Do you have a black and white cat? Can you determine their specific coat pattern?

Cat Obesity Chart: Find Out if Your Cat is Obese

07-08-2021 · The precise weight for a cat to be classified as “obese” varies widely: a small-framed cat could be obese at 5kg (11 lbs), while a large framed cat could be very thin at 5kg, but obese at 10kg (22lbs). This variation is why it is so important to carry out an individual appraisal of your cat’s body condition.

07-08-2021

obese cat

How do you know if your cat is obese or at a healthy weight?

It’s difficult to give guidelines for a cat’s weight, as body frame size can be so variable between individuals.

The simplest answer to maintain a healthy weight is to use a chart that allows you to use a scoring system to determine your pet’s Body Condition Score (BCS). You can also try a calculator like this one.

Purina, the pet food company, was one of the first to highlight the usefulness of these charts.

BCS charts use a numerical scale to grade a cat’s body condition. A number of different aspects of the cat’s body are assessed, and based on these findings, the cat is ranked from either 1-5 or 1-9, with the lowest number being the leanest, and the highest number indicating the most obese. The ideal body condition is the mid-point number.

Cat obesity chart

There Are Two Main Ways Of Evaluating Your Pet’s Body Condition:

First, a visual appraisal.

Look at your cat from above, from the side, and from behind.

From above, your cat’s chest should be wider than their abdomen, and their pelvic area should be wider than their waist, creating a type of hourglass appearance.

From the side, your cat’s chest should be wider than their abdomen, creating a type of wedge or triangular shape.

From behind, you should not be able to see the abdomen protruding on both sides.

Second, run your hands over your cat’s body, so that you can carry out an appraisal using physical touch.  You should be able to feel the outline of the underlying bones, but they should be under a thin layer of fat, rather than protruding in a visible manner. If you can’t feel the bones, then this means there is too much fat covering them.

Read Below For A Detailed Description Of The Various Body Condition Scores, From Thinnest To Most Obese.

Emaciated: The bones can be seen from a distance, with ribs, spine, and pelvis protruding. There is no fat covering, and the muscles are visibly less bulky than normal. When you feel your cat’s body, the bones are very easily felt. When viewed from above, the side, and behind, it is obvious that your cat is very underweight, to the point of being skeletally thin.

Very thin: The outlines of the ribs, spine, and pelvis can be seen when looking at your cat, and they are very easy to feel if you lay your hand on your pet. Your cat has a very obvious waist from above, and the abdomen is tucked up high when viewing from the side. The muscles appear underdeveloped.

Thin: The ribs can be easily felt when you place your hands on your cat’s side, with no overlying fat. The bones of the spine and pelvis can be seen. The waist is very obvious when your cat is viewed from above.

Underweight: The ribs can be easily felt, and the waist is very obvious when the cat is viewed from above. The abdomen appears tucked up when viewing from the side.

Ideal: You cannot see the outline of the ribs when looking at your cat, but they can be easily felt when your hands are placed on your cat’s sides. You can feel a fine coating of fat overlying the bones. You can see your cat’s waist when viewing from above, and the abdomen is tucked up when viewing from the side. When viewed from behind, the abdomen does not protrude on either side. Your cat’s muscle development is normal.

Overweight: The ribs can be felt. but it’s obvious that they are covered in a layer of cat. The waist is just visible from above. The abdomen is still tucked up when viewing from the side.

Heavy: The ribs are difficult to feel beneath the fat covering. There are visible fat deposits over the lower back and over the base of the tail. There is no visible waist when viewing your cat from above. The abdomen is not tucked up anymore, so the abdomen appears rounded from the side. When viewing from behind, the abdomen bulges out on both sides.

Obese: It’s difficult to feel the ribs, even when pressing firmly with your fingers. There is no visible waistline so that the body outline extends straight back from the ribs to the pelvis, or it may even be convex on both sides. The abdomen is rounded rather than tucked up, and a pot-belly type of shape is seen when viewing the cat from behind.

Also Read: Feline Obesity – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Severely obese: The ribs cannot be felt, even when pressing very firmly with your fingers. There is no visible waistline, and the body outline is convex, even almost spherical, when viewed from above. The abdomen is very rounded when viewed from the side, and a spherical, pot-belly contour is seen when viewing the cat from behind.

Click here to use our cat weight calculator and determine if your cat is at a healthy weight. 

Why should you use a cat obesity chart?

Cause of Fatty Liver Disease Image

Being overweight or obese can cause serious health issues, including an increased risk of illness and death.

One of the most important aspects of pet care is to ensure that animals under our care maintain optimal body weight. In the western world, obesity is frighteningly common.

Weight gain can happen slowly and insidiously. Up to two-thirds of pets carry extra weight, and animals that are overweight or obese carry an increased risk of morbidity (falling ill) and mortality (premature death). Neutered cats are more prone to gain weight, and most pet cats are neutered these days.

Common health problems that are more likely to affect overweight and obese cats include diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, and skin disease.

Studies have shown that pet cats that maintain a healthy weight have a better quality of life, and live significantly longer than those that are overweight or obese.

So if you want your cat to live their best and longest possible life, you need to ensure that they are as close to their ideal body weight as possible. Overweight cats should be encouraged to undertake a safe weight loss program.

Cats, as obligate carnivores, have a unique type of metabolism which means that weight loss needs to be planned carefully: if a fat cat suddenly stops eating, either from the restriction of food supply or by being offered a special type of food that they dislike, they can suffer from a dangerous condition called hepatic lipidosis.

Veterinary medicine has learned that the best way to help cats with weight management is to combine careful dietary modification (e.g. a dry food or wet food that is low in carbohydrates) with increased physical activity. Feline obesity is best tackled by working with your local DVM veterinarian, with close monitoring of wellbeing and body mass/ body fat over weeks and months.

The precise weight for a cat to be classified as “obese” varies widely: a small-framed cat could be obese at 5kg (11 lbs), while a large framed cat could be very thin at 5kg, but obese at 10kg (22lbs). This variation is why it is so important to carry out an individual appraisal of your cat’s body condition.

The lifespan of a cat is very variable, so it is impossible to answer this question accurately. However it is safe to say that obese cats, on average, do not live as long as cats that have a normal healthy body condition.

All About Black Cats

15-04-2022 · The most renowned black cat breed is the Bombay. These short-haired and solid-colored cats were bred to look like miniature black panthers. They’re the only breed that is always solid black; there are no other colors accepted in their breed standards.

15-04-2022

black-cat-feature-624x312.png

As some of the most misunderstood members of the cat world, black cats aren’t always what they seem. Some say they’re bad luck.

Others see a dark-colored cat and conjure images of witches and monsters. These unwarranted associations with all things creepy have given black cats an unfair, and flat-out wrong, reputation. In reality, black cats are friendly, loyal, and stunning.

They make affectionate family members and are just as personable and social as any other colored feline. There are a lot of interesting characteristics that make black cats special. From their history of being worshiped to genes that give them physical advantages, there is plenty to love about these inky-colored cats.

all about black cats

When it comes to black cats, the gene that codes for black fur is the most dominant of all the possible fur colors.

The Most Dominant Cat Color

Cat color is always dependent on genes. Every cat gets two sets of color-coding genes, one from each parent. Some colors are recessive, and some are dominant. Without pulling out your high school biology notes, the basic explanation is that some color genes override others and make it more likely for a cat to have that colored fur.

When it comes to black cats, the gene that codes for black fur is the most dominant of all the possible fur colors. This means if two cats that each possess the gene for black fur (even if they aren’t black themselves), reproduce, their offspring will be black.

Even if only one parent has the gene, there is still a high probability for black kittens. The gene for black fur even overrides the gene that calls for the common tabby pattern. As a result, there are more black cats than any other color.

black cat facts

While black cats are the most common of all cats, not every dark-colored feline you see is truly a solid black cat.

Black Fur Can Hide Patterns

While black cats are the most common of all cats, not every dark-colored feline you see is truly a solid black cat. The gene for black fur has the power to repress the gene for the tabby coat pattern, but it doesn’t delete it. In cats that only have one black fur gene, the tabby pattern might still be there.

Often called “undercover tabbies,” these black cats actually have subtle stripes, swirls, or spots. When you look at them in certain lighting or at certain angles, you can see that the tabby gene hasn’t been completely overridden.

Color-Changing Cats

In addition to having undercover coat patterns, some black cats even change color. When an outside cat spends a significant amount of time basking in the sun, the UV rays can break down the black pigment of their fur.

This is called “rusting” and results in a cat turning a rusty brownish-red color with age. This color phenomenon often helps reveal the tabby coat pattern that was hiding underneath that dark fur.

When an outside cat spends a significant amount of time basking in the sun, the UV rays can break down the black pigment of their fur.

Black Cat Breeds

Another misunderstanding about black cats is that they’re all the same breed. In fact, there are 22 cat breeds that can potentially have solid black fur. Some of these breeds have long, fluffy fur, and others are short-haired and sleek-looking.

The most renowned black cat breed is the Bombay. These short-haired and solid-colored cats were bred to look like miniature black panthers. They’re the only breed that is always solid black; there are no other colors accepted in their breed standards.

Besides the Bombay, the American Bobtail, Ragamuffin, Sphynx, Persian, Scottish Fold, and several other breeds have black fur. Black fur is also common for mixed breed cats.

black cat facts

There were some places and some time periods where black cats were considered good luck.

A Stroke of Luck

There’s no clear origin to the idea that black cats bring bad luck. Some think the idea came from a story in Greek mythology where the goddess Hera punished a servant by transforming them into a black cat. The servant then joined forces with the goddess of witchcraft.

In 1233, Pope Gregory IX announced his belief that black cats were demons in disguise. One man’s righteous declaration led to centuries of misinformation.

Black cats haven’t always been scorned, however. There were some places and some time periods where black cats were considered good luck. In Japan, for example, black cats are believed to be harbingers of economic success and true love. Many European sailors also considered black cats good luck and often sought them out to bring onboard their ships. The sailors’ wives also kept black cats at home to help ensure their husbands made it home safely.

all about black cats

Research has found that the gene that codes for black fur color also possesses attributes that support the immune system. With a bolstered immune system, black cats have a stronger resistance to common illnesses and serious diseases.

Cats Worth Worshiping

Besides being lucky, some ancient cultures even believed black cats were gods. Ancient Egyptians believed in the goddess Bastet who helped protect women and crops. Bastet’s physical form was believed to be a woman with the head of a black cat. Every black cat, therefore, was the embodiment of Bastet. They were revered throughout the community, and killing a black cat led to a death sentence.

A Physical Advantage

Black cats have endured more than their fair share of defamation, but their genetics suggest they have a physical advantage that other cats lack. Research has found that the gene that codes for black fur color also possesses attributes that support the immune system. With a bolstered immune system, black cats have a stronger resistance to common illnesses and serious diseases. Scientists aren’t sure if there’s an evolutionary reason behind this phenomenon or if it’s a lucky coincidence that benefits black cats.

Society isn’t always kind to black cats, but they’re lovable pets that deserve good homes just as much as any other cat.

black cat facts

Society isn’t always kind to black cats, but they’re lovable pets that deserve good homes just as much as any other cat.

View Sources

https://www.rd.com/list/black-cat-breeds/

https://www.ambassadoranimalgreenville.com/myths-and-facts-about-black-cats/

Snowshoe Cat Breed: Size, Appearance & Personality

Snowshoe cats are one of the few breeds with a fondness for water. These kitties typically jump at the opportunity to get their paws wet and will often join their people in the shower. The Breed Standard Eyes A Snowshoe cat should have walnut-shaped eyes …

Temperament
? The breed’s dominant personality traits. While each individual has a unique personality, breed-specific genetics affect qualities like sociability, playfulness, and intelligence.
Loving, curious, family-oriented, vocal
Origin
? Where this breed was first established.
Other Names
? In addition to their official names, most breeds earn a few nicknames.
Silver Lace, American longhair
Group
? Breeds are grouped by their size and coat type.
Medium to large short-haired
Height
? The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.
Body Length
? The typical adult body length among individuals of this breed. A cat’s length is measured from the base of the tail to the tip of the nose.
Weight
? The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.
Life Expectancy
? The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.
Price
Affection Level
? Breeds with a high affection level want to give and receive a lot of attention, while less-affectionate breeds are not as interested in petting and snuggles.
Activity Level
? Breeds with high activity levels will engage more in active play and demand more space and attention.
Pet-Friendly
? How well the breed tends to get along with cats, dogs, and other pets.
Kid-Friendly
? Breeds with a higher rating in this area tend to be gentle and patient, while lower-rated breeds may feel uncomfortable with children.
Sociability
? Breeds with a higher sociability rating will want to spend time with you all day, while less-sociable breeds seldom seek out human interaction.
Intelligence
? Breeds with higher intelligence ratings are more curious, investigative, and easy to train. Less-intelligent breeds are less trainable but often laid-back and easygoing.
Playfulness
? Breeds that score higher in this area have strong hunting instincts that make them great playtime companions.
Independence
? Breeds that score higher in this area are able to spend hours alone, while less-independent breeds require plenty of attention.
Vocality
? A higher rating in this area indicates a breed prone to plenty of meowing and other vocalizations, while less-vocal breeds are happy to stay quiet.
Grooming
? Breeds with higher grooming scores require more maintenance like brushing and bathing, while lower-scored breeds are virtually maintenance-free.

Adorable white feet give the Snowshoe cat its name, and distinctive white markings in the shape of an upside down “V” adorn its muzzle. Cuteness isn't the only thing that makes the Snowshoe such a wonderful cat: This breed absolutely loves people. In fact, Snowshoes are among the friendliest cats! While they do have a tendency to choose one person as their absolute favorite, they like everyone and readily make friends with new people shortly after being introduced.

Expect lots of fun and games if you bring a Snowshoe cat into your family. These kitties are curious and playful, and they like nothing quite so much as spending plenty of quality time with their favorite people. They'll help you with all sorts of tasks from typing to cleaning and when it's time to cook dinner or wash dishes, they happily provide advice from a nearby vantage point - perhaps a high place like the top of the refrigerator.

Snowshoe cats are expert cuddlers, too. If you have room on your lap, they'll take advantage of the opportunity to curl up for a movie or a bit of reading. At bedtime, they're likely to stretch out beside you, perhaps sliding under the covers or sharing your pillow.

Just like other breeds with lots of Siamese in their background, the Snowshoe cat requires lots of attention and becomes terribly unhappy if left alone for long periods of time. If boredom sets in, these kitties may develop unwanted behaviors and vocalize loudly. Fortunately, Snowshoe cats get along very well with other felines. If your family can't always be around, a second cat can help prevent loneliness and the destructive habits that can come with it.

Thanks to their outgoing, agreeable personalities, Snowshoe cats can be a great fit for any family with lots of love and attention to give.

About the Snowshoe Cat
Snowshoe Cat Care
Nutrition
Grooming
Exercise
Health

Snowshoe cats don't have any special nutritional needs, however they are known for exceptional longevity when their families prioritize good health and proper nutrition. We recommend offering your Snowshoe cat a high-quality, age-appropriate diet with plenty of protein and low levels of carbohydrates. This can help prevent obesity, which is a common health issue in older Snowshoe cats.

Snowshoe cats doing excellent job of looking after their own coats, which are typically very short and low-shedding. Occasional brushing can help remove any loose hair that might otherwise end up on furniture and clothing.

Because Snowshoes are prone to dental issues, it's a very good idea to teach your cat how to have their teeth brushed from a young age. Routine at-home dental care is a great habit that can help your cat enjoy better health overall.

Last but not least, consider keeping your Snowshoe cat's claws clipped. Toenail trimming is the easiest way to preserve your furniture, which these active cats are likely to jump on.

Snowshoe cats are highly active, with lots of energy to burn, particularly in their younger years. They love interactive play, either with their human family members or with other pets, and they appreciate toys of all kinds. These cats are perfectly capable of making their own fun when given a crinkly paper bag or a big empty box, and they love climbing cat towers, perching on window seats, and stretching out with the help of tall scratching posts.

Just like other highly sociable cat breeds, Snowshoes often enjoy leashed walks through the neighborhood. It takes some time and effort to teach a cat how to walk on a leash, but this is fantastic exercise that your Snowshoe will benefit from for life.

Snowshoe cats are generally healthy, however they can suffer from some of the same problems that plague Siamese cats including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and periodontal disease. These issues aren't common, however they are worth watching for.

Like Siamese, some Snowshoe cats have crossed eyes and kinks in their tails. Crossed eyes can have a negative effect on peripheral vision, however neither of these issues is painful or shortens the cat's lifespan.

Even though the Snowshoe cat breed wasn't officially developed until the middle of the 20th century, Siamese kittens with white feet and white markings on their muzzles have occurred naturally for as long as the breed has been part of human history.

In the 1960s, Dorothy Hinds-Daugherty, a Siamese breeder in Philadelphia noticed that three kittens – all from the same litter – developed Snowshoe markings instead of solid color points. Since white feet are not acceptable according to the Siamese breed standard, she decided to begin a brand-new line. Thus, the Snowshoe cat breed began.

When the white-footed kittens reached maturity, they were crossed with American Shorthair cats with tuxedo markings. At first, the resulting kittens were called Silver Lace cats. Others, including cat breeder Vikki Olander took notice, and the white markings which were originally viewed as Siamese faults became the hallmarks of a wonderful new breed that combines all the best traits of its founding members.

The American Cat Fanciers Association (ACFA) accepted the Snowshoe in 1982 and granted championship status in 1990. The International Cat Association (TICA) granted Snowshoe cats official recognition in 1993. In the UK, Snowshoe cats attained full breed status with The Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (GCCF) in 2013.

Today, the Snowshoe cat breed enjoys recognition worldwide. Show quality examples of the Snowshoe cat breed are relatively rare since it can be difficult to produce kittens that carry the recessive genes for both colorpoint and the piebald pattern that gives Snowshoes their distinctive appearance. It's easier to find pet quality Snowshoe cats with either too much or too little light to qualify for showing.

Snowshoe Cat History

Snowshoe cats are born all white and begin developing their color points at a few weeks of age.

The recessive gene that causes snowshoe markings doesn't occur often, making Snowshoe cats relatively rare.

Snowshoe cats are one of the few breeds with a fondness for water. These kitties typically jump at the opportunity to get their paws wet and will often join their people in the shower.

About the Snowshoe Cat
A Snowshoe cat should have walnut-shaped eyes that are set one eye’s width apart. All Snowshoe cats have blue eyes, with deeper colors being preferable.
The legs should be slender and well-proportioned to the body. The paws should be medium-sized ovals. The extent of white color on the Snowshoe cat’s paws should be similar on both front feet and both hind feet.
The tail should be of medium to long length, with a medium base and a gentle taper toward the tip.
The body should be long and lean, powerful but not bulky. This cat should feel heavy for its size.
The head should be wedge-shaped with high cheekbones and a straight nose. The muzzle should be of good length, without excessive broadness or square lines. Snowshoe cats should display an inverted white "V" on the muzzle, which may be prominent or so faint that it's difficult to see.
The ears should be medium to medium-large in size, with wide bases, slightly rounded tips, and positioning that continues the head’s wedge profile.
The coat should be medium-short, with no noticeable undercoat. It should feel dense and resilient, and should appear glossy and smooth.
All Snowshoe cats should have four white paws that contrast with the cat’s colored points, which are usually seal or blue. The cat may exhibit no more than ⅓ white on its body overall. White may extend to include a bib, white legs, a white tummy, and an inverted V on the face that extends from the bridge of the nose across the whisker pads and down to the chin. The chin should be white as well. Depending on registry, colorpoint snowshoe cats, bi-color snowshoes, and high white or harlequin snowshoe cats might be considered suitable for show. Longhaired Snowshoe cats might be accepted for show but are typically not considered suitable for breeding.

Snowshoe cats cost between 0 - 00.

Snowshoe cats tend to be medium in size. A fully grown Snowshoe cat might weigh between 6-12 pounds or more and range in height anywhere from about 9"- 11" inches tall.

The Average lifespan for Snowshoe is 14-19 years.

Snowshoe are short-haired cats. Therefore, they do not shed as much as long-haired cat breeds.

Related posts