Why Does My Cat Lick Me?- VyWhy

Last updated on 2022-04-03 20:25:32

2021-09-03

We humans tend to think that when one of our pets licks us, it's the equivalent of a "kiss," and it's a way to show love. While love and adoration may be one reason why your cat is licking you, here…

(Picture Credit: ryoichi/Getty Images)

Does your cat ever lick you? Have you ever wondered why they do it?

Cats aren’t exactly notorious for their outward affection. We humans tend to think that, when one of our pets licks us, it’s the equivalent of a “kiss,” and it’s a way to show love.

While love and adoration may be one reason why your cat is licking you, here are several other reasons as to why you may be receiving sandpaper kisses.

They’re Marking You

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Cats use licking as a means of marking territory. Licking marks you with your kitty’s unique scent, establishing the fact that you are their human.

Mama cats lick their kittens as a means of showing the world they are hers, and your cat could be doing the same thing to you.

Cats and kittens will lick each other as a way of social bonding, and you are being accepted and welcomed into your cat’s inner circle.

You Need To Be Clean

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Once your cat has established that you belong to them, they may continue to lick you in attempt to groom you.

Mother cats also use licking as a means of cleaning their kittens, and your cat is continuing the tradition their mother taught them.

If your cat is licking you as a means of grooming, you should feel honored, as that shows how comfortable and secure they feel around you.

You Are A Pacifier Substitute

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Cats who are weaned too early or were orphaned are prone to developing oral fixations that make them excessive lickers.

They missed out on the weaning process at a young, pivotal stage, so they may have some leftover licking and suckling habits as a result.

Your Cat Is Anxious

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Excessive licking from your cat can also be a sign of anxiety. Some cats may even lick themselves — or your arm — bald due to excessive stress and anxiety.

If your cat seems to be licking and grooming due to anxiety or stress, pinpoint what the source of anxiety is and remove it.

If it’s not that simple or you can’t identify an obvious trigger, talk to your vet about anxiety treatments.

How To Curb Your Cat’s Licking

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

An occasional kiss from your cat is nice, but having your skin worn raw by the rough texture of your cat’s tongue is not.

If your cat can’t seem to stop licking you, there are several ways you can deter them from the behavior. Try distracting your cat with some interactive play or with some play-inducing catnip.

If your cat still can’t seem to stop licking you, reprimanding will likely not help. Their licking is natural and, for the most part, a sign of affection or bonding.

If distraction methods don’t work, try giving your cat a nice, deep massage. Reciprocating the affection in this fashion can help curb any compulsive need to mark you, because you are showing them how much you care, as well.

A behaviorist, trainer, or veterinarian can give you advice for identifying the causes and correcting the behavior if all else fails.

Is your cat an excessive licker? Do you mind it? Let us know in the comments below!

Cats And Conjunctivitis

25-07-2018 · Conjunctivitis refers to the inflammation of the moist tissues in a cat’s eye, which are the portions of the eye located near the globe and up to the edge of the cornea — the front part of the eye. It can cause the cat’s eye to discharge fluid and other uncomfortable symptoms for the animal. Treatment, ultimately, is based on the ...

25-07-2018
(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

This article courtesy of PetMD.com.

Conjunctivitis in Cats

Conjunctivitis refers to the inflammation of the moist tissues in a cat’s eye, which are the portions of the eye located near the globe and up to the edge of the cornea — the front part of the eye. It can cause the cat’s eye to discharge fluid and other uncomfortable symptoms for the animal. Treatment, ultimately, is based on the underlying cause of the condition.

Symptoms and Types

There are several common symptoms of this disease, including:

  • Persistent squinting
  • Regular and excessive blinking
  • Redness of the eye tissue
  • Eye discharge
  • Fluid build up in the eye
  • Upper respiratory infection

Causes

There are several viruses that can cause conjunctivitis, one of the most common being the herpes virus. Cats that are regularly exposed to other cats with viral infections are more prone to develop the disease. There are also bacterial causes, one of which is commonly referred to as “dry eye.” In addition, allergies can cause the eyes to react as an external response to the allergen, or it may be as simple as a foreign particle lodging in the eye. Finally, purebred cats are more likely to develop the disease than other cats.

Diagnosis

The veterinarian will explore the different potential causes to determine the root cause of the eye infection so that it can be properly addressed. There may be seasonal allergies to things such as grass and pollen, or to environmental pollutants like smoke or chemicals. Viral and bacterial infections will also be considered.

Treatment

This condition is commonly treated on an outpatient basis. If there is a suspected food or environmental allergen causing the infection, the issue should clear up when the identified allergen is removed from the cat’s environment. If the infection is due to a virus, there are some commonly prescribed medications to manage the inflammation, including oral and topical (external) antibiotics. Vaccination is also a common treatment option to prevent against other viral outbreaks in the future. In serious cases, surgery may be required to remove any blockages that are found to be present in the eye.

Living and Management

Once the diagnosis has been made and a treatment plan has been prescribed, it is important to follow up with the animal’s progress. The first step in the treatment plan will be to address the underlying medical cause if there is one present. Next, it will be important to isolate the cat so that it does not infect other animals.

Prevention

Limiting exposure to other animals that are possibly infected can prevent recurrence of conjunctivitis. Also, some vaccinations have proven effective at minimizing the risk of developing this condition.

This article originally appeared here on PetMD.com.

National Feral Cat Day: Everything You Need To Know

15-10-2021 · October 16th is National Feral Cat Day. Whether you call them stray felines, outdoor cats, or community kitties, one thing is for sure — feral cats are still one of the most misunderstood animal groups in the United States. Feral cats — independent cats who live and hunt outside and are not socialized to humans — are nothing new.

15-10-2021

(Picture Credit: Arina_Bogachyova/Getty Images)

October 16th is National Feral Cat Day. Whether you call them stray felines, outdoor cats, or community kitties, one thing is for sure — feral cats are still one of the most misunderstood animal groups in the United States.

Feral cats — independent cats who live and hunt outside and are not socialized to humans — are nothing new. In fact, outdoor cats who hunt small game have been around for nearly 10,000 years. Misconceptions about feral cats wiping out populations of wildlife, like songbirds, contribute to a kind of prejudice against them.

These un-socialized kitties often don’t fare well at shelters. Local pounds sometimes deem feral cats un-adoptable and euthanize them as a result.

With all of that in mind, here’s what you should know about feral cats on National Feral Cat Day.

Changing Feelings About Feral Cats

(Picture Credit: Sedina Imamovic / EyeEm/Getty Images)

Slowly but surely, more humans are accepting the feral cat colonies that call our neighborhoods home. Consequently, they’re caring for these outdoor cats who provide a service by driving down rodent populations in communities.

“There’s a sea change in how our nation’s cities are approaching cats whose homes are the outdoors,” explains co-founder of US feline advocate group Alley Cat Allies, Becky Robinson.

Founded in 1990, Alley Cat Allies has made caring for and reducing the population of feral felines their mission. For that reason, they started National Feral Cat Day in 2001. National Feral Cat Day is a day of awareness to educate the public about outdoor cats in their communities.

Trap-Neuter-Return Programs

The Alley Cat Allies are also responsible for introducing Trap-Neuter-Return, also called Trap-Neuter-Release or TNR. As a result, shelters, rescues, and local government agencies now use TNR programs.

“Hundreds of municipal and private shelters and animal control agencies have Trap-Neuter Return and abandoned the cruelty of ‘catch and kill.’ Communities are seeing firsthand that these innovative programs really work,” Robinson explains.

Dr. Gene Mueller, manager of the Regional Animal Services of King County (RASKC) in Kent, Washington, told KING5.com that the public should not to forget about their communities’ feral cats on National Feral Cat Day.

“While the best place for a cat is indoors with a loving family, that’s not always possible for cats that aren’t used to living with people,” Dr. Mueller explains.

Giving Feral Cats Jobs

RASKC’s “Barn Cats R Us” program is turning the tides for the feral cats in their community, says Dr. Mueller. Volunteers humanely trap these outdoor felines and spay or neuter them. Then, they re-home cats where they can receive care and put their talents for rodent hunting to use.

The “Barn Cats R Us” program has also placed working cats in barns, garages, and other local businesses, says Dr. Mueller.

“Outdoor cats provide totally natural, organic mouse and rat control,” he explains. “Barn cats tend to hide from humans, and except for the occasional dead rodent they leave behind, you’ll rarely see any evidence of them.”

Star of Animal Planet’s  My Cat From Hell and cat behavior expert, Jackson Galaxy, recorded a Public Service Announcement (PSA) as part of the Alley Cat Allies mission to educate people about feral cats. Galaxy credits TNR programs for helping to keep the feral cat population in many areas under control.

“TNR helps reduce the number of cats being killed in our shelters each year,” Galaxy tells OregonLive.com, “and that’s something we all want.”

Robinson says even though her organization has made much progress, there is still a long way to go in their mission to save feral cats.

“Although more than 330 local government have ended ‘catch and kill’ and embraced TNR, there is still much more work to be done to spread this positive change,” says Robinson.

Will you help get the word out about feral cats on National Feral Cat Day? How else can people help feral cats in their communities? Let us know in the comments below!

Can Cats Have Down Syndrome?

30-03-2021 · The short answer is no, cats can’t have Down syndrome. But there are many other medical issues that a cat might have that can seem to resemble the condition. Remember, if something seems to be medically wrong with your cat, always seek the advice of a vet, regardless of the symptoms. Here’s what you need to know about why cats can’t have ...

30-03-2021

(Picture Credit: Evin Gul/Getty Images)

Vets are often asked the question, “Can cats have Down syndrome?” The short answer is no, cats can’t have Down syndrome. But there are many other medical issues that a cat might have that can seem to resemble the condition.

Remember, if something seems to be medically wrong with your cat, always seek the advice of a vet, regardless of the symptoms.

Here’s what you need to know about why cats can’t have Down syndrome and what other conditions a feline might have instead.

Why Can’t Cats Have Down Syndrome?

In humans, Down syndrome is a congenital disorder that happens due to the presence of an extra 21st chromosome. Humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes in total.

This can cause birth defects that affect a person in both physical and mental ways. Common symptoms in humans include a shorter neck, decreased muscle tone, and a smaller head, mouth, and ears.

So why can’t cats have Down syndrome? Well, the answer is that felines only have 19 pairs of chromosomes, so there’s no way they could actually have the condition as they don’t possess the 21st chromosome.

What Conditions In Cats Might Resemble Down Syndrome?

(Picture Credit: emmepiphoto/Getty Images)

Since the rise of social media, there have been many accounts of pictures of cats going viral where the original poster suggested their cat had Down syndrome. This is not possible, but there are cases where a cat might seem like they have it.

Some of those symptoms include:

  • Having a squished-looking nose
  • Seeming clumsy while walking
  • Widely-spaced eyes or upturned eyes
  • Motor dysfunction issues

If a cat has one of these conditions, there is a chance that the feline was infected by the panleukopenia virus, which occurs in utero. The cat might also be afflicted with cerebellar hypoplasia, which is a neurological condition.

A kitten who experiences trauma to the head at a very young age can also seem like they might have Down syndrome. In some cases, if the mother cat interacts with a number of toxic substances, she might produce a litter that includes kittens with compromised neurological systems.

As always, if you suspect there is something troubling your cat, no matter what you think the cause might be, it’s imperative that you speak to a professional veterinarian before taking any further remedial steps or action.

Have you ever thought your cat had Down syndrome? Did your vet find out what was really going on with your feline instead? Let us know about the experience in the comments below.

Bombay Cat Breed Information, Pictures, Characteristics & Facts

The Bombay is a medium-size cat; when lifted, he feels heftier than he looks. The breed develops slowly and males may not reach full size and musculature until they are 2 years old. Children And Other Pets The outgoing Bombay is a perfect choice …

Some cat breeds are typically independent and aloof, even if they've been raised by the same person since kittenhood; others bond closely to one person and are indifferent to everyone else; and some shower the whole family with affection. Breed isn't the only factor that goes into affection levels; cats who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily.
See Cats Less Affectionate with Family
If you're going to share your home with a cat, you'll need to deal with some level of cat hair on your clothes and in your house. However, shedding does vary among the breeds. If you're a neatnik, you'll need to either pick a low-shedding breed or relax your standards. This furniture cover can make it easier to clean up cat hair and keep it off your sofa!
  • See Cats with Low Amount of Shedding
Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems. This doesn't mean that every cat of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk. If you're looking only for purebred cats or kittens, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in.See Cats Prone to Health Problems
Being tolerant of children, sturdy enough to handle the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and having a nonchalant attitude toward running, screaming youngsters are all traits that make a kid-friendly cat. Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual cat will behave; cats from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences and personality.See Least Kid Friendly Cats
Some cat breeds are reputed to be smarter than others. But all cats, if deprived the mental stimulation they need, will make their own busy work. Interactive cat toys are a good way to give a cat a brain workout and keep them out of mischief. This scratcher cat toy can keep your smart kitty busy even when you're not home!
  • See Cats with Less Intelligence
Friendliness toward other household animals and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things. Some cats are more likely than others to be accepting of other pets in the home.
  • See Least Pet Friendly Cats
  • Cat breeders are an experimental lot, creating distinctive new breeds either by building on natural genetic mutations or by crossing breeds to achieve a new look, color or pattern. The Bombay, named for the exotic port city of India, has no connection with the subcontinent but was created from crosses between sable Burmese and black American Shorthairs to resemble a black panther in miniature.

    Breeder Nikki Horner of Louisville, Kentucky, is credited with developing the Bombay, starting in the late 1950s. Her goal was a sleek, shiny black cat with a muscular body and friendly temperament. British breeders achieved the same look and personality with crosses of Burmese and black domestic shorthairs.

    The Cat Fanciers Association gave the Bombay full recognition in 1978. Today the breed is recognized by all cat associations. To maintain their body type and coat texture, Bombays may be outcrossed to sable Burmese. The CFA also permits outcrosses to black American Shorthairs, but this is rarely done because of differences in body type.

  • The Bombay typically weighs between 8 and 15 pounds. Males are generally larger than females.

  • The lively and affectionate Bombay loves people and is adaptable to many different environments and lifestyles. His calm nature makes him a good apartment dweller, and he is amenable to life with other pets, although he definitely wants to be top cat.

    Expect to find the Bombay hogging the warmest spot in the house. That includes under the covers at bedtime. Most will converse with their people in a distinctive but not loud voice.

    Bombays are often good at playing fetch, and some have learned to walk on leash. This is a smart cat who loves to play and will thrive with a family who is willing to teach him tricks, play games with him and provide him with plenty of interactive toys.

  • Both pedigreed cats and mixed-breed cats have varying incidences of health problems that may be genetic in nature. Bombays are generally healthy, although one of the genetic diseases seen in Burmese has also been seen in Bombays: craniofacial defect.

    Sometimes called Burmese head defect, the craniofacial abnormality is occasionally seen in newborn kittens, which may have severely deformed heads. Those kittens are euthanized, so people who are buying Bombay kittens will not encounter the problem, but breeders should research pedigrees carefully to make sure they don’t breed cats who carry the gene for the defect.

  • The Bombay’s short, sleek coat is easily cared for with a few strokes of the hand or at most weekly brushing or rubdown with a chamois to remove dead hair, distribute skin oil and polish the coat to its gleaming best. A bath is rarely necessary.

    Brush the teeth to prevent periodontal disease. Daily dental hygiene is best, but weekly brushing is better than nothing. Wipe the corners of the eyes with a soft, damp cloth to remove any discharge. Use a separate area of the cloth for each eye so you don’t run the risk of spreading any infection. Check the ears weekly. If they look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball or soft damp cloth moistened with a 50-50 mixture of cider vinegar and warm water. Avoid using cotton swabs, which can damage the interior of the ear.

    Keep the litter box spotlessly clean. Like all cats, Bombays are very particular about bathroom hygiene.

    Plan to spay or neuter your Bombay at 6 to 9 months of age. It is not unheard of for Bombays to reach sexual maturity as early as 5 months of age.

    It’s a good idea to keep a Bombay as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Bombays who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.

  • Except for his dramatic black coat, the Bombay looks much like the Burmese, but with a few physical differences such as a larger, longer body and longer legs. He has a rounded head with medium-size ears set wide apart, eyes that range in color from gold to copper, and a straight, medium-length tail. The short, fine coat feels satiny to the touch and shines like patent leather.

    Although the gene for the black coat is dominant, a sable-colored kitten is sometimes born in a Bombay litter. Some associations permit these kittens to be registered as Burmese.

    The Bombay is a medium-size cat; when lifted, he feels heftier than he looks. The breed develops slowly and males may not reach full size and musculature until they are 2 years old.

  • The outgoing Bombay is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

Havana Brown Cat Breed Information, Pictures ...

The Havana Brown is playful and smart and can be a good friend to a child who treats him nicely. He’s one of those cats who enjoys playing fetch and learning tricks, and his energy level means he won’t wear out before the child does. He is happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition.

file_2750_havana-brown-460x290-460x290.jpg

The Havana is distinguished by his uncommon head shape; it’s longer than it is wide.

See all Havana Brown characteristics below!

Some cat breeds are typically independent and aloof, even if they've been raised by the same person since kittenhood; others bond closely to one person and are indifferent to everyone else; and some shower the whole family with affection. Breed isn't the only factor that goes into affection levels; cats who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily.
See Cats Less Affectionate with Family
If you're going to share your home with a cat, you'll need to deal with some level of cat hair on your clothes and in your house. However, shedding does vary among the breeds. If you're a neatnik, you'll need to either pick a low-shedding breed or relax your standards. This furniture cover can make it easier to clean up cat hair and keep it off your sofa!
  • See Cats with Low Amount of Shedding
Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems. This doesn't mean that every cat of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk. If you're looking only for purebred cats or kittens, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in.See Cats Prone to Health Problems
Being tolerant of children, sturdy enough to handle the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and having a nonchalant attitude toward running, screaming youngsters are all traits that make a kid-friendly cat. Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual cat will behave; cats from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences and personality.See Least Kid Friendly Cats
Friendliness toward other household animals and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things. Some cats are more likely than others to be accepting of other pets in the home.
  • See Least Pet Friendly Cats
  • How did a brown cat of Southeast Asian origin, believed to offer protection from evil, come to be known as a Swiss Mountain Cat, and how did it then adopt the name Havana Brown? The full answers to those questions are lost to history, but what appears to have happened is that solid-brown cats of Siamese type from Thailand were exhibited in Britain in the 1890s. Somehow during that time they acquired the moniker Swiss Mountain Cat.

    In 1920, the Siamese Cat Club of Britain decided that brown cats without blue eyes were no longer desirable, and that was that. Breeders lost interest in them until the 1950s, when a group of British cat breeders set themselves the task of determining the genetic makeup of a self-brown (solid-colored) cat. They eventually produced a male chestnut-brown kitten, the result of a cross between a shorthaiared black cat and a chocolate-point Siamese.

    Russian Blues and Burmese may also have played a role in the development of what came to be known as the Havana Brown (whose only connection to Cuba is the supposed resemblance of his color to that of a fine Havana cigar). But as it turned out, according to an article in the 1982 CFA Yearbook, the most successful and most often used breeding to produce a self-brown cat was between a black shorthair and a seal-point Siamese carrying the chocolate gene.

    The cats, which also went by the name Chestnut Foreign Shorthair—as many aliases as they had, they might well have been Cold War Cuban spies—were first exported to the United States in the 1950s. It was then that the breed began to go two different ways. In Britain he is now considered to be a brown Oriental Shorthair. In the U.S., he is known as the Havana Brown and has a body and head type that distinguishes him from his British cousin. The Cat Fanciers Association recognized the breed in 1964.

    The Havana Brown is a rare breed, so much so that his genetic diversity is threatened. It has been propped up by an outcrossing program begun in 1998, which permits the cats to be bred to unregistered black or blue domestic shorthairs or certain colors of Oriental Shorthairs or chocolate-point or seal-point Siamese. The kittens produced by those breedings can then be bred to Havana Browns. If those kittens have the Havana Brown coloring, they can be registered as Havana Browns.

  • The Havana is a medium-size cat weighing 6 to 10 pounds.

  • The rich tobacco-colored cat known as the Havana Brown may or may not be named for the addictive leaf, but the cats themselves are addictive to the people who come to know them. They are outgoing and friendly. Expect one to follow you around the house as you go about your day.

    Like most cats with Siamese ancestry, the Havana can be demanding and talkative, but his voice is softer and his personality more subtle. He is smart and likes the challenge of teaser and puzzle toys. When he is through playing, the affectionate Havana will happily ensconce himself on your lap.

  • Both pedigreed cats and mixed-breed cats have varying incidences of health problems that may be genetic in nature. Havana Browns are generally healthy, although some may be prone to upper respiratory infections, usually when they are young.

  • The Havana Brown’s short, smooth coat is easy to care for with a quick weekly combing. Polishing it with a chamois will make it shine. A bath is rarely necessary.

    Brush the teeth to prevent periodontal disease. Daily dental hygiene is best, but weekly brushing is better than nothing. Trim the nails every couple of weeks. Wipe the corners of the eyes with a soft, damp cloth to remove any discharge. Use a separate area of the cloth for each eye so you don’t run the risk of spreading any infection.

    Check the ears weekly. If they look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball or soft damp cloth moistened with a 50-50 mixture of cider vinegar and warm water. Avoid using cotton swabs, which can damage the interior of the ear.

    Keep the litter box spotlessly clean. Cats are very particular about bathroom hygiene.

    It’s a good idea to keep a Havana Brown as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Havana Browns who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.

  • The Havana Brown’s distinctive color extends even to his whiskers. He is the only cat with a breed standard that spells out whisker color: brown, of course, complementing the coat color.

    Looking out from all that minky-brown richness are vivid green eyes with an oval shape. The Havana is also distinguished by his uncommon head shape; it’s longer than it is wide. Large ears tilt forward.

    He has a firm, muscular body covered in short, smooth fur in a rich, warm reddish-brown.  Kittens and young adults may have the barest hint of tabby markings, which disappear as they mature. The nose leather is brown with a rosy flush, and the paw pads are a rosy brown as well.

  • The Havana Brown is playful and smart and can be a good friend to a child who treats him nicely. He’s one of those cats who enjoys playing fetch and learning tricks, and his energy level means he won’t wear out before the child does. He is happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

Snowshoe Cat Breed Information, Pictures, …

Like his ancestor the Siamese, the Snowshoe is a pointed cat, meaning she has a light-colored body with dark areas in seal or blue: the tail, legs, and ears, plus a mask around the eyes, broken up by an inverted V-shaped marking in white between blue eyes and over the muzzle.

Some cat breeds are typically independent and aloof, even if they've been raised by the same person since kittenhood; others bond closely to one person and are indifferent to everyone else; and some shower the whole family with affection. Breed isn't the only factor that goes into affection levels; cats who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily.
See Cats Less Affectionate with Family
If you're going to share your home with a cat, you'll need to deal with some level of cat hair on your clothes and in your house. However, shedding does vary among the breeds. If you're a neatnik, you'll need to either pick a low-shedding breed or relax your standards. This furniture cover can make it easier to clean up cat hair and keep it off your sofa!
  • See Cats with Low Amount of Shedding
Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems. This doesn't mean that every cat of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk. If you're looking only for purebred cats or kittens, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in.See Cats Prone to Health Problems
Being tolerant of children, sturdy enough to handle the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and having a nonchalant attitude toward running, screaming youngsters are all traits that make a kid-friendly cat. Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual cat will behave; cats from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences and personality.See Least Kid Friendly Cats
Some cat breeds are reputed to be smarter than others. But all cats, if deprived the mental stimulation they need, will make their own busy work. Interactive cat toys are a good way to give a cat a brain workout and keep them out of mischief. This scratcher cat toy can keep your smart kitty busy even when you're not home!
  • See Cats with Less Intelligence
Friendliness toward other household animals and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things. Some cats are more likely than others to be accepting of other pets in the home.
  • See Least Pet Friendly Cats
  • Like his ancestor the Siamese, the Snowshoe is a pointed cat, meaning she has a light-colored body with dark areas in seal or blue: the tail, legs, and ears, plus a mask around the eyes, broken up by an inverted V-shaped marking in white between blue eyes and over the muzzle. Four white paws punctuate the dark legs, with the front paws termed “mittens” and the rear paws “boots.” The body is more rounded than that of the Siamese, with short hair.

    The appearance of the Snowshoe harks back to the late Victorian era, with photographic and silk-screen evidence of Siamese kittens with four white feet, but the breed we know today was not developed until the mid-20th century. White-pawed Siamese known as Silver Laces made a brief appearance in the 1950s, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that Philadelphia Siamese breeder Dorothy Hinds-Daugherty decided to create a Siamese-type cat with white paws and a moderate body. She called them Snowshoes.

    Daugherty began with three white-pawed Siamese kittens and bred them to a domestic shorthaired cat with tuxedo markings (black coat and white belly, chest, throat, and paws — often with a black mask around the eyes). With intelligence from both sides of the family tree and the moderating influence of the domestic shorthair on the Siamese body type and personality, it’s no wonder the new cats were seen to have potential both as companions and show animals.

    Daugherty eventually gave up breeding cats, but other breeders who saw merit in continuing to develop the interesting and beautiful cats carried on her work. The Cat Fanciers Federation recognized the Snowshoe in 1982, followed by American Cat Fanciers Association in 1990 and The International Cat Association in 1994. The Cat Fanciers Association does not yet recognize the breed.

    While the Snowshoe is a distinct breed, the cats are still sometimes bred back to Siamese or Oriental Shorthairs to maintain their traits. It’s not easy to produce kittens with the desired markings, so the breed is uncommon, despite the ubiquity of Grumpy Cat.

  • This medium-size cat weighs 9 to 12 pounds. Females are smaller, weighing 7 to 10 pounds, although some approach the size if not the heft of males.

  • The Snowshoe is a unique individual who is always interesting to live with. A Snowshoe may be the bossy master or mistress of the home, the feline “Mom” who’s always checking in on you, the entertaining clown, or the needy best friend. In whatever guise she comes, you can expect her to be smart, active, and affectionate, although she may take her time warming up to visitors.

    A Snowshoe usually chooses a favorite person in the family, but she maintains cordial relationships with everyone. She stays close to the favored person and can often be seen leading them to something of the Snowshoe’s interest.

    Snowshoes are smart and will often learn to open doors or perform tricks, including running feline agility courses. They like to play fetch, may walk on leash, and enjoy dabbling in running water. Some even take to swimming. This is an active cat who can often be found perching on top of the refrigerator or some other vantage point from where he can survey all that’s going on.

    Thanks to their Siamese heritage, Snowshoes tend to be “talkers.” Fortunately, they have a soft, melodic voice that’s easy on the ears. Plan to carry on many interesting conversations with your Snowshoe; she’ll want to know all about your day, how you feel about the local school board election, and whether you think dinner will be soon. He won’t hesitate to register any complaints with you about her meals or accommodations, but this sweet-tempered cat knows you catch more flies with honey than vinegar.

    Snowshoes are mellow and generally get along with other pets, including dogs. That said, it’s certainly possible to end up with one who prefers to be the center of your world and will do best as an only cat.

    Choose a Snowshoe if you will enjoy spending time with and interacting with your cat. A Snowshoe likes company and would prefer not to be home alone all day. If you work long hours, she’ll appreciate having a feline or canine friend.

  • Both pedigreed and mixed-breed cats have varying incidences of health problems that may be genetic in nature. The Snowshoe is generally healthy, however. Occasionally, a Snowshoe may have a kink in her tail or crossed eyes — vestiges of her Siamese ancestry — but those cosmetic flaws don’t affect her health or ability to be a great companion.

  • Brush a Snowshoe’s short coat once or twice a week to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. Brush the teeth to prevent periodontal disease. Daily dental hygiene is best, but weekly brushing is better than nothing.

    It’s a good idea to keep a Snowshoe as an indoor-only cat to protect her from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Snowshoes who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have a unique and beautiful cat without paying for it.

  • The Snowshoe has a short, smooth coat that’s easy to care for. Snowshoe kittens are born white. Their points (dark or patterned areas of fur on the tail, legs, head, and ears) begin to develop when they are a few weeks old and darken as the kitten matures. The body is usually a light cream color ranging to beige or tan with seal or blue points. Other point colors such as chocolate or lilac are difficult to produce and rarely seen. Those colors also provide little contrast with the white paws. Paw pads and nose leather can be pink; the same color as the points; or a combination of the two.

    Because the Snowshoe’s pattern is recessive and involves several gene factors, it’s difficult to consistently achieve the desired look. No cat has perfect markings. Those who come closest to the ideal — the ones you’ll see in the show ring — have an inverted white “V” between the eyes and over the muzzle, two white mittens in the front and two white boots in the back. The more symmetrical the markings, the better. Markings that are acceptable but not preferred include a blaze on the face or white markings on the chin, throat, and stomach. It’s best if all four feet are solid white with dark points separating the white foot color from the light body color. White that goes too high or too low on the leg or face is a flaw and may put a kitten into the “pet quality” category depending on her other qualities. In a perfect world, a Snowshoe won’t have spots of the point color in the white areas or white streaks (called runners) going from the white areas into the points.

    A Snowshoe glances at you with large, wide eyes of sparkling blue. The eyes are described as walnut-shaped: larger and rounder than the Siamese eye, but not as round as the eye of a Persian.

    The rectangular body is firm and muscular, but never bulky. The Snowshoe resembles a runner, not a wrestler, but is more powerful than she looks. When you pick her up, you may be surprised at how substantial she feels. Medium-large ears top the slightly rounded head, which should be as wide as it is long. Medium-size paws are oval and taper to the toes.

  • The active and social Snowshoe is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. She will play fetch as well as any Retriever, learns tricks easily, and appreciates the attention she receives from children who treat her politely and with respect.

Highlander Mixed Cat Breed Pictures, Characteristics, & Facts

The Highlander cat breed dates back to 1993, when they were originally introduced as the Highland Lynx before a name change the following year. These felines are super smart, so you’ll need to provide a living environment for them that will keep them mentally satisfied. This breed mix makes for very people-friendly cats and great family pets.

highlander-mixed-cat-breed-pictures-cover.jpg

The Highlander is a mixed breed cat–a cross between the Desert Lynx and Jungle Curl breeds. Gentle, social, and intelligent, these felines inherited some of the best traits from their parents.

You may find these cats in shelters and breed specific rescues, so remember to always adopt! Don’t shop if you’re looking to add one of these kitties to your home!

The Highlander cat breed dates back to 1993, when they were originally introduced as the Highland Lynx before a name change the following year. These felines are super smart, so you’ll need to provide a living environment for them that will keep them mentally satisfied. This breed mix makes for very people-friendly cats and great family pets.

See all Highlander mixed cat breed characteristics below!

Highlander Mixed Cat Breed Pictures

Additional articles that will interest you:

Some cat breeds are typically independent and aloof, even if they've been raised by the same person since kittenhood; others bond closely to one person and are indifferent to everyone else; and some shower the whole family with affection. Breed isn't the only factor that goes into affection levels; cats who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily.
See Cats Less Affectionate with Family
If you're going to share your home with a cat, you'll need to deal with some level of cat hair on your clothes and in your house. However, shedding does vary among the breeds. If you're a neatnik, you'll need to either pick a low-shedding breed or relax your standards. This furniture cover can make it easier to clean up cat hair and keep it off your sofa!
  • See Cats with Low Amount of Shedding
Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems. This doesn't mean that every cat of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk. If you're looking only for purebred cats or kittens, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in.See Cats Prone to Health Problems
Being tolerant of children, sturdy enough to handle the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and having a nonchalant attitude toward running, screaming youngsters are all traits that make a kid-friendly cat. Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual cat will behave; cats from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences and personality.See Least Kid Friendly Cats
Some cat breeds are reputed to be smarter than others. But all cats, if deprived the mental stimulation they need, will make their own busy work. Interactive cat toys are a good way to give a cat a brain workout and keep them out of mischief. This scratcher cat toy can keep your smart kitty busy even when you're not home!
  • See Cats with Less Intelligence
Friendliness toward other household animals and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things. Some cats are more likely than others to be accepting of other pets in the home.
  • See Least Pet Friendly Cats
  • The Highlander was originally developed by a breeder named Joe Childers back in 1993. The intention was to produce a domestic feline that combined a striking wild cat look with social and playful personality traits. Despite originally having the word Lynx in their name, the mixed breed doesn't actually contain any wild cat genes in their makeup.

    The Highlander was officially acknowledged by the International Cat Association (TICA) in the year 2008.

    These days, you may find Highlanders in shelters or in the care of rescue groups. So make sure to consider adoption if you decide that this is the mixed breed for you!

  • The Highlander is a medium-to-large sized cat. As is always the case, exact size standards might vary.

    Most Highlanders weigh in at ten to 20 pounds. That said, many may be smaller or larger than average.

  • Highlander cats are athletic and energetic felines. You'll need to be able to provide a large enough living space for them to run around in, along with adding interactive toys to the environment.

    The Highlander is a very intelligent cat--in many cases they can be taught to play fetch and pull off tricks!

    Balancing out the Highlander's upbeat side, these cats are also very social and loving. They enjoy being around humans and interacting with them, and despite the big cat angle to their heritage, they're affectionate towards the people in their life. The cat also does well around children, acting like a new play friend.

    Unlike most other cat breeds, the Highlander also likes water, so don't be surprised to see them playing with water in the bathtub or from a running tap!

  • Highlanders are generally considered to be healthy cats; although, they can be predisposed to the same conditions that the Desert Lynx and Jungle Curl breeds face. As always, it's important to schedule regular wellness visits with your cat's vet.

    There aren't any known breed specific health problems associated with the Highlander, but always keep an eye out for signs that your cat might be in distress or pain.

  • As with all cats, it's important to keep up your Highlander's regular veterinary checkups to detect any health concerns early. Your vet can help you develop a care routine that will keep your cat healthy.

    Beyond scheduling yearly wellness visits with your vet, you'll want to add a scratching post to your Highlander's living environment. This can help promote healthy scratching and keep the cat's nails in good condition.

    The Highlander's ears should also be examined regularly for signs of dirt building up or possible infection. It's also advisable to talk with your vet about starting a regular teeth brushing regimen that will suit your Highlander. Your vet can advise you about specific brands and techniques.

    It's important to underline that the Highlander mixed breed needs a higher than usual amount of exercise, so make sure to add at least one cat tree or piece of interactive furniture to your home before adopting one.

  • The Highlander is a mixed breed of cat that you'll see in a wide range of colors and patterns. It's common to see them with solid coat colors or with tabby or lynx point markings.

    When it comes to grooming, most Highlanders are fairly low maintenance, with their short hair requiring only a quick weekly brushing. This will help lessen the likelihood of hairballs and mats forming. Although it should be noted that some Highlanders are long haired felines--in which case you'll need to aim for closer to daily brushing sessions.

    In terms of climate, the Highlander is generally an adaptable breed of cat. Although you should always make sure that there's enough shade and fresh water available during the hotter months.

  • The Highlander is a super friendly and outgoing feline who does very well with young children. Just be sure that early socialization takes place and boundaries are properly set on both sides, and supervise early interactions between kids and cats.

    When it comes to other household pets, the Highlander fares well with many domestic animals, including dogs. Always supervise early interactions between the new cat and existing pets.

    Ultimately, early socialization really pays off with this mixed breed. Make sure to reward your Highlander for good behavior when you bring them home to your family!

  • It may be hard to find a breed specific rescue for Highlanders because they are a mixed breed. However, you may want to try shelters and rescues that cater to all types of cats, including Highlanders, as well as your local shelter. Here are some nonprofit rescues you can try:

    • Hope For Paws
    • Best Friends Animal Society

    You can also try CatTime's adoption page that lets you search for adoptable cats by breed and zip code!

Related posts