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Interview Question: "Why Do You Want to Change Jobs?"

If it is a well-known (public) fact that your current employer has a shrinking market share or other financial problems, you might refer to this issue after making a strong case for why the new job is suitable. Be sure to avoid painting an overly negative picture of your current employer's situation, though. A vague reference to your employer's difficulties will usually be sufficient.

Are you ready to discuss why you're interviewing for a new job? Hiring managers will be curious about why you want to change jobs. They want to hear that you're leaving for the right reasons—a better opportunity, more challenges, and career growth.

The interviewer will want to be sure that you aren't leaving your job because of poor performance, difficult working relationships, or because you hate your job or your boss. When responding to questions about why you are switching jobs, it's important to provide reassurance that you are moving on for the right reasons, not just to get out of a bad work situation.

Every question the hiring manager asks during the interview process is designed to figure out whether you’re the right person for the job. In this case, they’re trying to determine whether you’re someone who will thrive at the company. They’re looking for signs that you’re a person who’s building their career intentionally, and that you can get along with bosses, colleagues, and clients.

They won’t want to hear that you were fired for cause, that you’re leaving because you hate your coworkers or employer, or anything that suggests you won’t be successful at their organization.

If you were fired, it’s a good idea to practice answers to that question, too. You can even spin that experience as a positive, if you’re prepared.

Emphasize the positive reasons why you are targeting a job with their organization. Refer to specific aspects of the work, company culture, and employer that correspond well with your interests and skills.

Placing the focus upon your potential employer subtly redirects the conversation from your previous work experience to your strong potential as their next employee. It is also a great way to show that you’ve done your homework in researching their company before your interview.

Come to the interview prepared with an answer that highlights why you’re eager to join this organization and take this particular job. Emphasize the skills and experience that make you a superior candidate—and keep it positive.

I was lucky enough to land a job at a startup right out of school, which means that I wore many hats right from my first day in the office. Now I’m looking forward to taking my graphic design skills into a senior role.

Why It Works: This response is positive about what may have been a challenging work environment, while emphasizing that the candidate has the skills, experience, and attitude necessary to be successful in the new role.

I love helping writers develop. In my current job, I’ve had the opportunity to mentor many experts who had knowledge our readers needed, but not necessarily the writing experience necessary to translate those ideas into print. I’m excited about doing the same thing in a non-profit environment where I can use my skills to give back to my community.

Why It Works: This answer shows that the candidate is supportive and interested in helping others learn, and that they’ve developed skills in their field and are looking forward to the next challenge. This response also reflects a connection to the mission of the organization—something that’s important in the non-profits.

I’ve been one of the top sellers at ABC Corp for three quarters running, increasing sales by more than 10% each quarter. But now that I’m in the Los Angeles area, I’m ready to bring my skills to this market. I’ve always dreamed of working at XYZ Inc., and I was excited to see an opening that’s a perfect fit for my experience and abilities.

Why It Works: While this answer mentions an external reason for changing jobs—in this case, a move to a new city—it also emphasizes that the interviewee wants to work for this organization specifically. Hiring managers want candidates who are excited about this particular job—not just any job in the field.

Frame your move as a path to advancing your career without disparaging your current job. One way to do this is to reference the aspects of the new job which appear to carry more responsibility. Even if the new job doesn't have a higher status, you could mention that you believe it would provide a springboard for career advancement down the road—after you have spent appropriate time in your initial job with the employer and have mastered it.

You might also mention that you feel that the job you’re applying for seems more aligned with your long-term career goals, which you should be prepared to discuss.

Integrate positive references to your current job in your response, so that it is clear (or at least appears) that you are not fleeing a bad situation. You are just seeking to improve upon an already good situation. Of course, you should avoid any negative references to management, to salary, or to the number of hours worked.

Incorporate some positive reflections upon rewarding relationships with supervisors, co-workers, and clients, whenever feasible. You might describe opportunities the company gave you for career development, for example, or discuss a particularly rewarding experience you had with a client.

Consider giving an external reason for leaving. You might refer to factors such as relocating to a more urban area or looking for a job that is closer to home.

Don’t say anything negative about your employer, boss, coworkers, or clients. The interviewer might assume that you’re the problem, and not the people you’re disparaging. In any case, they’ll wonder if you might do the same to this company, should you be hired.

If you do mention an external reason for changing jobs, emphasize that it’s not the primary reason. For example, if you’re moving to a new city, that might be a contributing factor to your decision to change jobs, but it shouldn’t sound like the only reason you’re interviewing.

The emphasis should always be placed upon the fit of the job itself, and how you can help the organization succeed.

Perhaps you can explain that you are seeking to take your career in a different direction or use your skills in a new way, and this position offers an atmosphere your old company was unable to provide.

Avoid sharing any propriety information. If it is a well-known (public) fact that your current employer has a shrinking market share or other financial problems, you might refer to this issue after making a strong case for why the new job is suitable. Be sure to avoid painting an overly negative picture of your current employer's situation, though. A vague reference to your employer's difficulties will usually be sufficient.

  • Why are you the best person for the job? Best Answers
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EMPHASIZE THE POSITIVE REASONS: Growth and opportunity = good. Negative aspects of old job = bad.

TALK ABOUT YOUR CAREER PATH: Show this potential move in the context of your career as a whole.

CONSIDER GIVING AN EXTERNAL REASON FOR MOVING ON: For example, if you’re moving to a new city, that’s an excellent reason for changing jobs. But make sure it isn’t the only reason you mention.

AVOID SHARING PROPRIETARY INFORMATION: If your current employer is suffering financial problems that are well known, you don’t have to pretend otherwise. But don’t get bogged down in details and don’t share proprietary info.

How To Answer "Reason For Job Change"

21-11-2017 · Changing a job can be a tedious task. Yet, with a positive outlook, we should embrace the idea that change is good! Irrespective of the reason for job change, which could be anything from poor…

21-11-2017

Changing a job can be a tedious task. Yet, with a positive outlook, we should embrace the idea that change is good! Irrespective of the reason for job change, which could be anything from poor management to a horrible supervisor, never criticize your employer in an interview. Let bygones be bygones. Stay cheerful and give a positive reply. Here are some sample answers to help you ace this interview question!

Get prepared for some of the most frequently asked HR interview questions and answers.

When the question “why do you want to change your job?” is asked to you in an interview, you can answer with any one of the many ready-to-use positive replies about a reason for job change. Remember to pick the answer which suits your situation the best.

Possible Answer #1

In my current organization, I am managing a small team of 15 people. I have had a great experience and gained important skills like resource management and client servicing. In the last 3 quarters, I have led the team to beat projected targets by a sizable percentage. I am now eager to manage a larger team because I feel that I am ready to take up more responsibility. My current organization can offer me a promotion, but the team strength would remain the same and the opening that you have clearly seems to be the next logical step in my career. This is basically my reason for job change. Working with your organization will enable me to successfully grow professionally.

Possible Answer #2

There is no particular reason for job change in my case. Let me be clear about the fact that I resigned from my last job. Within a week of joining that company, I realized that my strengths and weaknesses were not aligned with the requirements of the post. It was a great organization but their expectations from the position were different. I decided it was best that I left at the earliest and started to hunt for more relevant opportunities. My reporting manager was a great guy and a true mentor, and he is also one of the references I have mentioned in my resume. Clearly, it shows that I left on great terms with my past employer and had a wonderful learning experience, even if it was a short one. I am looking to work for an organization that has a creative environment. Also, reputation is certainly an important factor. Besides, the job description should match my long term career goals. I have closely followed the growth of your company and read all about its work culture through the company reviews posted by real employees. You have also shared all your values and expectations clearly with me in the job description. Based on this information, I think this is the right place for me to jumpstart my career once again. I have the potential to add immense value to this position and excel within your organization.

Possible Answer #3

My current employer is a leading player in the corporate sector and I have had wonderful opportunities to grow and explore my interests within the organization. I have sharpened my skills in management, resource allocation, fund raising and several other areas. I used to think that my calling was in this sector alone. But lately, I have realised that now is the right time to actually switch. Through my disciplined corporate skills I honestly want to create a greater social impact. As a result, since the past few weeks, I have been seeking a good reason for job change and a great opportunity to make a switch. Your organization gives me the perfect platform to do so. I am a part of the CSR team at my current organization and want to dedicate myself fully in a similar role in your company as well.

Possible Answer #4

My reason for job change is the termination of my contract. For the past 2 years I have worked on a contractual basis as a contractor at several locations. 90% of my time was spent on travelling from one city/country to another. In order to develop my project management skills and explore other fields, I needed a stationary full-time job with minimal travel.  When I read the advertisement for this particular job opening, I was captivated! It looks like a good opportunity for me to work under a stellar leadership as well as hone my skills. I am passionate about such a work environment and have the same views as your organization on zero wastage and inclusive growth. Interestingly, at my current organization I was able to reduce wastage in my department by 37% by suggesting that we only generate e-bills! I am sure that with my diverse background, I will be of great service to this firm.

Possible Answer #5

My current employer is going through corporate optimization and my department is going to be laid off. The reason for job change is I was told by the higher management to look for other avenues of work and they have been extremely helpful during this transition period of 90 days. I have a strong technical foundation and constantly update my skills through online courses and timely certifications. I am now looking to diversify my profile and work with a larger client base. My current employer works with only 11 clients, and I am aware that your company caters to over 50 clients. This presents a challenging and exciting prospect for me. I am keen to utilize my potentials and skills to add value to your company.

Possible Answer #6

My reason for job change is upward mobility and financial growth. I have worked with my current employer for the last 4 years and have grown well. I am grateful for my experience as I have imbibed a spectacular work ethic and in-depth industry knowledge. However, my work is no longer challenging. I have no new avenues to grow within the organization. That being said, I am keen to make this transition to stay on the path of progress. I am excited to interact and work closely with the thought leaders of our industry who are also a part of the leadership team of your organization.

Possible Answer #7

I joined my current company right after college as an intern, and eventually got absorbed. After 10 long years, I realised that although it has been a great learning experience, I have to move out to grow more. I conducted research on lucrative markets for internal teams, thereby working in close quarters with multiple resources. I loved every single activity that I carried out and all the interactions I had across departments. Over the past 6 months, I have observed and familiarized myself with corporate negotiation skills, grit and perseverance.  My current company cannot offer me any more variety beyond this, and that is my reason for job change. I am eager to switch immediately. I want to start learning immediately and build my skills, as well as help your organization grow like I helped my current company grow. Moreover, I am a loyal consumer of many of your products and it thrills me to have the opportunity to work on them.

Possible Answer #8

Having worked with my current organization for 15 months, I find my daily tasks repetitive. Although the work environment is comfortable, there is no space for skill enhancement. I discussed this with my supervisor and we tried to pitch it to the bosses about expanding my functions.  However, it was not possible given their business goals for the next 18 months. This is the most honest and best reason for job change, that I can quote right now. I have the intent to expand my skill set through the position offered by your company. It is indeed a highly demanding role, but I believe I have a great supply of energy and diligence to meet this demand.

Possible Answer #9

I am currently working for an organization with 700 employees. The growth of the company has been spectacular in the past 5 quarters and I have had a great experience with my team.  However, I want to work in a more dynamic environment where my experience and skills will be appreciated. I truly believe that I possess immense potential and can contribute more than I am currently able to. A small team like yours encourages one to step out of their comfort zone and that’s where I want to be! I realize that your organization gives opportunities to its employees to broaden their horizons, and even switch teams for more exposure in multiple internal business units. I have some ideas to contribute to your success story that I would love to share with you later.

Possible Answer #10

To be honest, I was not actively looking for a new job. I am happy with my current position and organization. I came across this job posting on a popular job board and applied immediately! On reading more about the company and the responsibilities aligned with this profile, I decided to apply. My qualifications and expertise are a direct match with the requirements of this role. But, the core industry is completely different than the one I am currently in. This presents me with a wonderful opportunity to update my skills and branch out into a new industry. That is my reason for job change.

The hiring manager is eager to know your reason for a job change for obvious reasons. He/she will not hire candidates who resent their current employer or have an attitude issue. Hence, this is your golden chance to convince her/him that by recruiting you, it will be a valuable change for their company and for you too! After all, any change is good, which also includes a reason for job change!

All the best. ?

HR Interview Questions & Answers

How to Answer Why You Want to Change Jobs Interview ...

09-09-2018 · You need to think of your skills as commodities; valuable assets that you are willing to apply and share in a new environment. In other words, you need to sell yourself. But if you go in and rattle off a bunch of negative information in response to the question of why you want to switch jobs, you are putting a bad taste in the recruiter’s mouth.

09-09-2018

answering interview questions man

How to answer questions about why you want to change jobs

Are you hunting for new work while currently employed? Have you been speaking to recruiters and human resources specialists within your field? Trying to figure out how to answer the question: “Why do you want to change jobs now?”

If the answer is, you aren’t alone. One of the first things a hiring manager wants to know is why you want to leave your current place of employment.

As a person who does a lot of career counseling, I can tell you that the way you answer that question is critical. If you respond the right way, you’ll probably move on to the next stage of the interview process.

But if you respond the wrong way, it could nix your chances for further consideration. That may sound ridiculous and perhaps over the top, but I’m just being real with you.

This post is designed to help you come up with answers that will help you get through this question successfully. First, I’ll start off with a list of responses hiring managers want to hear. Then, we will look at things you want to avoid.

Finally, I’ll offer you possibilities for how to reply during telephone screening sessions or face to face interviews.

What recruiters want to hear

  • Changing jobs for career growth
  • Looking for new opportunities
  • To encounter new challenges
  • To learn new skills
  • To better apply skills
  • The expansion of your knowledge base
  • More responsibility

What recruiters don’t want to hear

  • You have a poor performance record
  • You have attendance issues
  • Problems you have had getting along with others
  • You don’t like your job
  • You hate your boss
  • Your coworkers are jerks
  • Your current salary sucks
interview answers changing jobs
Interviews mean selling yourself

The goal is to sell yourself

Here is what I tell clients. You need to think of your skills as commodities; valuable assets that you are willing to apply and share in a new environment.

In other words, you need to sell yourself. But if you go in and rattle off a bunch of negative information in response to the question of why you want to switch jobs, you are putting a bad taste in the recruiter’s mouth.

Pretend you are a manager trying to staff an open position. Would you want to hire someone who comes off as bitter? Are you going to really consider a job candidate that vibes out entitled? Is there a chance in hell you would move someone to the next stage of consideration if they seem like a troublemaker?

I think you get my drift. To the extent possible, you want to paint a picture that you are likable, smart and valuable. There’s an old axiom that goes like this: People buy from people they like.

When it comes to recruiting, interviewing, and hiring, the dynamics are no different.

Now let’s examine 5 smart ways answer that question about why you want to change jobs.

1. You like the company

If you tell the recruiter that you want to switch jobs because you like the company, you instantly communicate something positive.

Obviously, you need to do some homework in advance and learn more about the organization in case you get follow up questions. Here are some possible responses:

  • “I’ve been impressed with the direction the company has been taking in the finance arena.”
  • “In talking to people I know in our industry, I’ve heard really positive things about the company from employees.”
  • “The new direction the CEO is taking is impressive. I’d like to be part of the organization’s growth.”
  • “The position seems to match my long-term career goals.”

2. You want to grow your skills

When you tell a hiring manager you want to grow your existing skillsets, you are communicating you are a team player.

Now the trick is doing this in a way that doesn’t disparage your current employer. There is one can be tricky, so you’ll really want to think about what works best for your situation.

Possible ways to frame things include:

  • “The position you are recruiting for seems to align well with my skills. I’m hoping to apply my abilities in this job while learning new skills.”
  • “I really like to learn new things. Given my background and what you have shared about this position, I really believe this is an excellent opportunity for mutual growth.”
  • “You mentioned the company was starting to expand into Latin America. I would love more exposure to this segment of the world because so much of my background has been linked to European business.”
  • “The new CRM program the company is using sounds amazing. I’m confident I can learn this system quickly and apply that knowledge to the company’s goals for growth.”

3. You are looking for new challenges

By communicating with a recruiter that you are looking for new challenges, you are sending the signal that you are eager to solve problems and bring about resolution.

Obviously, you don’t want to say your current job is boring or mundane. That’s negative. But that doesn’t mean you can’t talk about wanting more stimulation or responsibilities.

Here are a few ways you could answer:

  • “I’m a team player and enjoy working with groups. I love my current job but the opportunity for team projects doesn’t happen much.”
  • “In my current position, I manage a team of five. But I know I am capable of leading larger teams. This new position sounds like it would be a wonderful opportunity.”
  • “Implementing a new software system sounds exciting. But I also know that it can be challenging. I’d like to be part of making the rollout successful.”
  • “Currently, my sales territory is the in the government sector. I’d love to learn the ins and outs of new areas like education and finance. I’m a quick and motivated learner.”

4. Talk about using your skills in new ways

Sometimes, the job you are seeking will not be an exact match for your background. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t apply.

The trick is to talk about using the skills you already have in new ways. These are called transferable skills. Here are some ways to talk about this when asked, why do you want to switch jobs?

  • “I love people and providing solution-focused customer service. Joining your social media response team would allow me to apply my abilities in this area while learning about the new platform at the same time.”
  • “Most of my IT work has focused around network architecture. The position you are hiring for sounds like I could apply my abilities to the company’s network design initiative”.
  • “I’m fluent in Spanish and do a lot of work in Mexico. The job you are hiring for asks that the person is knowledgeable of Italian. Because both languages are similar – and with some work on my part – I know that I can be successful here.”
  • “The position mentioned the need for someone with python coding for web-based applications. I’ve got a lot of experience with python in data-analysis. I’m confident I can use those skills in the job you are staffing.

5. Downsizing (when it’s public knowledge).

Has your company recently announced layoffs? Are they closing operations in your city? Have they merged with a new organization?

If the answer is yes and the information is public, there’s nothing wrong with using this in response to the question about changing jobs.

Example ways to respond include:

  • “You may have heard my company will be closing operations next year. I’m hoping to secure a new position now before those changes take place.”
  • “Our company recently merged with USA Widgets. Given the pending changes, I thought this would be a good opportunity to see where else I could apply my skills and contribute to a new team.”
  • “A few weeks ago, my company informed our department that our group was being eliminated as part of a merger. I’m hoping to find a new position before the permanent changes take place.”

Bringing it all together

The approaches mentioned above shouldn’t be thought of as cookie- cutter answers. Instead, think of them as springboards to be used for greater dialogue.

Part of being successful in landing a new job is having smart, believable responses to interviewer questions. The overriding point is to come off as positive. Under no circumstances should you say something ugly about your current or past employer.

From the hiring perspective, you’ve got to recognize that the decision to extend a job offer is always a risk. To the extent possible, you want to make yourself the least risky choice with the most amount of gain.

If you are looking for more ways to make a good impression on job interviews, I highly recommend Knock ’em Dead Job Interview: How to Turn Job Interviews Into Job Offers (See Amazon).

Authored by Martin Yates, this is an excellent resource to help you cast yourself in the best light possible. I can’t tell you how many people I’ve worked with over the years who have directly benefited from this book.

In closing, I will leave you with this. Recruiters like hiring people who are enthusiastic, positive, and motivated. Contextualize everything you have read here with these three traits in mind.

I hope you found this page to be useful. Good luck with your job hunt.

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    13 Signs You Need a New Job
  • What are good reason for changing jobs?

    You can gain a broader base of knowledge.You can increase your earning power.Your current job doesn't challenge you.You simply cannot stand your boss any longer.Your employer is about to fail.Your life has changed in a major way.Co-workers create a hostile atmosphere.Your job focuses on your weaknesses.You have a better offer. More items...
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    Related video: "Why Did You Leave Your Last Job?" 3 Strategies for Best Answers

    In this video, we explain three key reasons why employers choose to ask this question and shares interview strategies for how to best answer it in a professional manner.

    One of the most common questions interviewers ask is, “Why do you want to leave your current job?” Hiring managers want to know why you’re leaving so they can learn more about what’s important to you in a job and how you handle undesirable situations.

    There are several ways to answer this question, so take time before your interview to prepare a thoughtful answer that will give your interviewer confidence about the decision to hire you. Here are a few examples of how to answer, as well as some tips on choosing the best option for you.

    Common reasons for leaving a job

    • Your values no longer align with the company mission

    • You’d like additional compensation

    • The company you worked for went out of business

    • You feel undervalued in your current role

    • You are looking for a new challenge

    • You want a job with better career growth opportunities

    • You had to leave due to family or personal reasons

    • You don’t like the hours at your current job

    • You decided to relocate to a new city

    • You want to change career paths

    • You decided to go back to school

    • Your personality didn’t align with the company culture

    • You found a better opportunity

    • You had to leave for health reasons that have since been resolved

    • You were laid off or let go

    • You wanted to work in a different industry

    How to answer "Why do you want to leave your current job?"

    1. Be clear about your reasons for exiting

    Take time to write down all the reasons you’re looking for a new opportunity. If you’re not sure about what they are, consider the following questions to get started:

    • What are your values?

    • What are your career goals? Where do you want to be in five years? 10 years?

    • What are your needs in a workplace environment? What do you need in a job?

    • What do you like about your position? What do you dislike?

    • What are your relationships like with coworkers? Managers?

    • What industry do you want to be in?

    • Are you passionate about your company’s mission?

    • Does your current situation align with these answers? Why or why not?

    After you’ve written your answers down, circle a couple of key reasons you want to give in your interview. You should select reasons that stand out as professional rather than personal. For example, you may be looking for a new job because of a recent life change such as a marriage or move—these are not the reasons you should lead within the interview.

    2. Keep your answer short

    Though it’s important to fully answer your interviewer’s question in explaining why you want to leave your job, keep your response to around one or two sentences. Then, point the conversation back to why you’re the best person for the job.

    3. Stay positive

    Even if negative experiences have informed your decision to leave a job, it’s extremely important to find a positive way to explain your desire to move on. Employers want to hire problem solvers who can work through difficult situations. Focus on the skills you learned in your current role, good relationships you may have built with your coworkers or positive interactions you had with customers or stakeholders.

    For example, instead of,
“I don’t like my manager. I’ve tried talking to him, but it looks like I have to find a new job,” try something like, “In my current role, I’ve learned many new skills. I’m looking for a position in which I can continue to grow that skill set in new circumstances.”

    4. Be honest without being too detailed

    When answering this question, you don’t need to go into all the details. If you find your current job unsatisfying, there is always a way to share that without disparaging your current employer (tips on this below). Keep your answer focused and short, and move the conversation back towards why you are excited about the opportunities ahead of you.

    It’s important to keep in mind that the company you’re interviewing with may contact your previous employer, so what you’ve told them should be in line with what they’ll learn in those conversations. If you’re unemployed, be honest about that situation as well. If they get in contact with your previous employer to confirm start dates, salary range or get a reference, this could hurt your chances of getting the offer if you’ve provided different information.

    Read More: How to Explain Employment Gaps in an Interview

    How to frame your reasons for leaving a job

    After you’ve thoughtfully listed out your reasons for leaving a job, the next step is to consider how an interviewer might interpret your answer. Here are a few examples of reasons that might not present well in an interview, and a few alternatives if any of the following are on your list:

    "I don’t like the company."

    There are positives and negatives in every company, including the one you’re interviewing for. Take a moment to think about why you don’t like the company you work for, and use this to craft a more positive, clear response.

    For example:

    “At my current organization, I’ve expanded my professional skillset and built great relationships. Recently, it became clear to me that I need motivation from a strong mission while continuing to grow professionally. The mission of your company to serve underrepresented communities is something I’m excited to work on.”

    “I’ve been working on my communication and collaboration skills when it comes to facilitating large, complex projects. The opportunities to grow that expertise are limited in my current role, so I was excited to learn about this opportunity, where collaboration and transparency are mentioned as important components of the job.”

    "I’d like more pay."

    Think carefully about whether this is the reason you want to share—it can be interpreted by interviewers in a number of ways that can be hard to predict. If you decide it needs to be addressed, try framing it in a way that focuses on the larger topic of incentives and your motivation to take on challenging work that comes with big rewards:

    “I’m motivated by a lot of factors, and client satisfaction, as well as peer and manager approval, are at the top of the list. But compensation is also a motivator for me and I’m excited about the opportunity to sell a product I’m passionate about, exceed my targets and celebrate when I’ve surpassed my goals.”

    "I’m bored at work/I don’t like the job."

    This reason for wanting to leave likely comes from dissatisfaction with the work you’re doing in your current role. Often, this means that you’re doing work that doesn’t fit with your skills and abilities or isn’t challenging. Try explaining this with a response based on skills and opportunities you’re seeking:

    “I’ve learned a lot in my current role, but I’m looking for an opportunity that provides more challenges as I continue developing my skills and abilities.”

    or

    “While I’ve gained important skills in my experience with this role, like communication and time management, I want to focus more on honing my leadership and writing skills. I’m excited that this role provides more opportunities to grow those skills.”

    "I don’t like the hours at my job."

    If the hours and flexibility of your next job will play a significant role in your decision to accept an offer, this may be a good detail to share with your interviewer. However, the way you frame this response is crucial. You don’t want to come across as someone who isn’t willing to work hard. Instead, give an answer that positions you as a responsible and mature professional who knows how to manage your time well:

    “I know that I do my best work when I have a healthy balance between work and life. The commitments I make to my managers and colleagues mean a lot to me, and I plan my days around following through on those commitments efficiently. It’s important to me to work for a company that values my ownership of my schedule and allows for flexibility when appropriate.”

    Related: How to Quit a Job the Right Way

    Good reasons for leaving a job

    There are many reasons you can and should explain why you’re looking for a new opportunity. As professionals grow in the workplace, there is a natural flow from one job to the next as people seek out new learning opportunities, career development, new environments and other factors. Let’s look at a few examples of good reasons you’re looking for a new job:

    1. Looking for career growth

    Depending on how companies are structured, some may provide more opportunities to grow than others. It might also be challenging to change teams or departments if you’re looking to grow in a different direction. The desire to move to a new level in your career is a common reason for leaving a job. Here’s an example of how someone in this situation might explain why they’re leaving:

    “I love my role and coworkers, but I’ve come to a point where there are no longer growth opportunities on my team. Can you tell me a bit about growth opportunities for this job, and what the company does to develop employee careers?”

    2. Desire to change career paths

    It is increasingly common for people to explore several different jobs and careers in their lifetime. Whether you want to go back to school, change industries or pivot what you’re working on, changing careers is a great example of why you may want a new job:

    “I’m looking for a new opportunity that doesn’t exist at my current company where I can develop and expand my account management skills.”

    3. Identified a better opportunity

    Perhaps you’re looking to leave your job because you simply have a better choice. Whether that means your work environment will improve, you’ll get better pay or the company’s mission is a better match your values, it’s reasonable to seek out a new work situation when a better opportunity comes up:

    “Though I’ve learned a lot at my company, from my research about this opportunity, I can see that the position is a better fit for where I want to take my career—specifically, collaborating with cross-functional teams to develop innovative products for your users.”

    4. Let go or laid off

    This is a reality for many people and can understandably be cause for anxiety when it comes time to explain why you’re looking for a job. Take some time to prepare your answer and follow these guidelines:

    • Be truthful without going into unnecessary detail

    • Avoid using the word “fired” if you can

    • Explain what you learned from the situation

    • Direct the interviewer toward why you’re a good fit for the position

    Here are two examples:

    If you were let go:
    “In retrospect, I understand my former employer and I had different expectations about what success meant in my role. As I reflect on that experience, I realize there are some things I could have done differently. I learned a lot, and I’m excited about the opportunity to bring that maturity to my next job. This role is in line with my skills and abilities, and the direction I’d like my career to take.”

    If you were laid off:
    “Unfortunately I was impacted by a company restructuring that resulted in a loss of 15% of our employees. In the meantime, I’ve been thoughtfully considering my next move, reconnecting with my network and researching opportunities. I’m excited about this position because it exemplifies the parts of my past work I enjoyed the most and will position me in the direction I’ve always wanted to pursue in my career.”

    These are just a few of many valid reasons you should explore new opportunities. If you’re unsure about what your answer may communicate to interviewers, try to get feedback on your reasons from trusted friends or mentors.

    Related: How to Know When It Is Time to Leave a Job

    Preparing for follow-up questions

    Depending on the way you’ve answered the question, your interviewers may have follow-up questions, such as:

    • “Did you try to pursue this position at your current company?”

    • “How did you try and resolve those issues before deciding to look for a new role?”

    • “How do you plan to prevent miscommunication about expectations in your next role?”

    Consider these as you complete your answer, and develop a few ideas for what your answer may look like for follow-up questions. Remember: Leaving a job for a new opportunity is very common. Your interviewer has likely left a job in their past, so they will be able to understand your position. Be clear on your reasons, plan your response and continue directing the conversation toward why you’re the best person for the job.

    How to Explain Reason for Job Change (With Examples)
  • What to consider when changing jobs?

    Have you walked around the workplace? How do people interact? ...Will you be able to communicate openly with various levels of management? Is the environment collaborative?Are you going to be challenged at the new workplace? Will you be able to advance? ...Have you researched the company? ...
    What to Ask Before Changing Jobs
  • How to explain your reasons for leaving a job?

    Ways to positively frame reasons for leaving a jobLooking for higher pay. It's best to provide other reasons for leaving a job if this isn't your only reason. ...Interested in a different company culture. If you're searching for coworkers who are more collaborative and engaging, explain to your interviewers how important company culture is to you.Want to work under new management. ...

    Walk

    Explaining why you left a previous employer in your interview is never easy, and there are a lot of traps you can fall into that can cost you your next job.

    This article is going to walk you through how to safely explain your reasons for leaving an unpleasant company without hurting your chances of getting that next job.

    1. Don’t Badmouth

    You may have had a really bad work situation, but if you talk a lot about a terrible circumstance, you’re only going to make the interviewer wonder whether you were part of the problem.

    It’s nothing personal. It’s human nature to want to know the other side of the story. The safest bet is to avoid talking about how horrible things were and to never badmouth your former company or boss.

    What should you do instead then?

    2. Turn It Into a Positive

    It’s okay to briefly mention the problem and the reason you needed to leave – without speaking too negatively. But then, you should turn it into a positive situation and frame the conversation around what you gained by leaving.

    Let’s say your boss was unsupportive, and you felt that was destroying your career. You could say that you didn’t feel supported by your boss and others in your organization felt the same, so you decided to find a company with a stronger leadership team that would help you take your career further.

    Rather than stopping at the problem, talk about what you decided to look for next in your career. It will make it sound like you’re striving to improve yourself, which is always a good thing.

    The example above did one more great thing, too – it provided social proof. You didn’t just say that you felt your boss was lacking; you mentioned that other people felt the same way. This is a good way to show the interviewer you weren’t the problem. Be prepared to face follow-up questions if you use this strategy, including questions about why your colleagues felt that way.

    3. Reiterate Why You’re Interested in Their Company

    The interview is about your prospective employer’s job above all else, so focus the conversation on that. With the example above, you could say that strong leadership is still important to you and one of your priorities in your current job search. Then, ask the interviewer what types of things management does in their company to help employees grow and improve. (In fact, that’s one of the best questions to ask in any interview.)

    Here’s a Full Example Answer:

    Based on the above, we can formulate a full example answer:

    Question: “Why did you leave your previous job so quickly after joining?”

    Answer: “After joining the company, I did not feel my career was advancing as I hoped it would. My boss wasn’t very supportive compared to previous bosses I’ve had, and others on my team felt the same. I decided to take action and left the company to find a work environment that would support my growth and provide the next step in my career. Working for great leadership is still very important to me. Can you tell me about what management in your company does to help its employees grow and improve?”

    If you follow the steps above, you’ll be able to craft a great answer that avoids many of the common mistakes that other people make, such as badmouthing too much or giving a long-winded answer. You’ll also end your answer perfectly, by turning the focus of the conversation back onto your new employer!

    Biron Clark is an executive recruiter, career coach, and founder of careersidekick.com.

    How to Explain Why You Left a Toxic Work Environment
How to Answer the Question 'Why do you want to change jobs ...

Pay and benefits are often the reason why many seek to change jobs. You work somewhere for a certain period and expect that you’ll rise up the ranks. With the rise, you’ll get a better pay as well as more benefits. What if that doesn’t happen? This is quite like the answer about being promoted. And with the word “deserve” in the sentence, you show that you’re actually being mistreated. Maybe even …

In your quest to land that great job, there are many things you need to do.

From searching job boards, writing the perfect resume, practicing for the interview etc. There’s  a lot to be done.

The interview is the last step. It’s what stands between you and the job. Failing to perform well in the interview means you’re not moving forward. Either from your current job which you want to leave or from your state of joblessness.

Interviewers know that you want the job and are willing to prove it. They will ask you many questions in an effort to find out whether you’re really the right candidate for the position.

And some of those questions can be tricky to answer. Whereas you think the answer you give is what they’re looking for, they might actually be looking beyond your answer.

One such question is the one about your reason for leaving your current job. If you’re currently not working, you might be asked why you left your last job.

Either way, there’s something the interviewer is seeking to know.

THE REAL REASON YOU’RE ASKED WHY YOU WANT TO CHANGE JOBS

This question is a big one. And when asked, try to see beyond the question.

In this article, we give you the thinking behind the question so you know what possible answers mean.

We’ll tell you what to avoid saying and afterwards advice you on what should guide your response.

Interviewers can’t read your mind and obviously can’t fully trust the answers you give.

As such, they have to dig for information so as to be able to make the best decision for the company.

With this question, let’s look at two conclusions the interviewers may make based on your answers.

You are a Complainer

If someone asked you whether you are a whiner, what would you say? No?

Of course you’re well prepared and even know how to paint the right image. You have the right body language and your answers are impressive.

But what are some of your negative traits?

One rule of thumb when asked this question is that you should never be negative.

When you give the impression that your job is a bad one, that means you complain about it. Being that in an interview you’re definitely controlling yourself, what happens when you’re more free?

The company with a vacancy must ask itself what you’ll be saying about it when with friends. That’s important because there is nothing as powerful as the word of mouth. If people tell one another how bad a company is, then that can only result in bad business.

Repairing a damaged business reputation is not easy. So if you’re the kind of employee who would be quick to complain, you’re easily seen as a liability.

Will the interviewer pick a liability for the open position?

You are a Problematic Employee

It is widely known and has been proven through research that employees don’t quit jobs. They quit managers. If you have previously quit a job, you probably did so due to issues with your boss.

However, from the manager’s perspective, you might be the problem.

Yes, this may not be the case and the research cited above proves it.

But if you have never gotten to understand the workplace from a manager’s perspective, you may not get the whole picture.

It’s true that many managers need training and even a change of strategy in how they handle employees.

Some organizations are smart enough to put in the effort and cultivate the right culture.

Still, understand that your interviewer is most likely a manager in the company you’re interviewing in.

The lenses through which she looks at you are not necessarily those of your peers.

She is likely looking for someone who will work hard and give the goals of the company a place in his heart.

Moreover, even in an organization where people are treated well, you’ll still not be taken simply because you seek a better work environment.

Your interviewer must ensure that you’re not going to be the one spoiling the party at their organization.

So, if your answer gives even the slightest hint that you could be a problem, you’re likely to get no response. Or if you do, it might be a regret letter.

There are certain words or phrases you should never allow yourself to make. No matter how bad your boss or job is, you should steer clear of being open about it.

Your interviewer is not your friend who will empathize with you and encourage you that all will be well. She is on a business mission. She seeks to fill a position with the employee who will bring maximum benefit to the company.

So what should you not say?

Anything that is exactly like the below or related in a way is to be avoided.

“I don’t like my job”

You’ve heard that you should be honest during an interview.

That’s true—you should never lie during an interview as it can lead to termination even if you get hired.

Dishonesty is a big concern for many companies.

Besides, it’s not a good trait to have. And if it’s strong enough, it can spread from you to others.

But honesty, especially in an interview should be practiced with wisdom. You should not just be open about everything in your effort to show honesty. As mentioned, the interviewer is out on a mission.

If you say you’re leaving your current job since you don’t like it, several questions come to mind.

You’ll need to explain that. And since those interviewing you are very keen to hear the reason, you’ll just have stirred their interest in finding out more.

Leaving your current job because you don’t like it implies that you’re not a loyal employee.

You’re just looking for a place where you’ll be comfortable. In the event that comfort reduces, you’ll not hesitate from moving again.

The interview process is costly for companies. And if they see the possibility of a hiring cycle because you can leave at the slightest discomfort, then they would rather not consider you.

No interviewer will spend too much time trying to figure out the real truth. They don’t have the luxury of time. So what they’ll do is take your answer, and maybe your explanation, then make conclusions from it.

Remember that this is not your friend who is all positive about you. In an interview, you have the responsibility of convincing strangers that you’re the best.

“My colleagues are difficult to work with”

Granted, there are people who are simply difficult to work with. Those might be the kind of people you’ve had to deal with for the period you’ve been in your current job.

But the interviewer doesn’t know that and doesn’t have the time to hear the details so as to prove it. And even if you tell her all the details, she has only heard your side of the story. How sure is she that you’re being honest?

Today, there is a lot of emphasis on teamwork and that is for a good reason. Projects are completed on time and general productivity increases with teamwork.

Your interviewer will seek to find out how much of a team player you are. If you’re like many job seekers, you have said in your resume that you are a team player. Does your answer to this question prove otherwise?

If you are truly a team player, challenges in working with people aren’t the biggest problem for you.

You have likely developed a way of managing the differences between you and them and are able to get the job done.

This is more critical if the position you’re interviewing for is in management or any form of leadership like supervisor.

If therefore working with your current colleagues is difficult, could it be that you’re the difficult employee? Could it be that you’re too rigid and would only like things to be done your way?

“I just don’t like my boss”

This is one of the worst things you can say about your current or former boss. You may not even be asked to explain much and your explanation may even make things worse.

First of all, a negative comment about your current boss is not wise.

Bosses are often the same in many ways. One of those ways is in their desire for your loyalty. If you don’t like your boss but you’re working under him, are you sure you’re not working against him?

In the ears of the interviewer, this answer could as well shout the words “saboteur.” You are not at all devoted to your work and that means you are a burden to your employer.

How sure can the interviewer be that you’ll not soon dislike your prospective boss? And if you do, what will that mean for the team you’ll be working with and the entire company?

Also, have you thought of the possibility that your interviewer could be a friend of your current boss? What is she to think of you making such a comment about her friend?

Interviewers are humans too and they will seek to protect their friends even as they protect the company. If your interviewer knows your boss and you say something negative about him, you may not be proceeding beyond this particular interview.

“My boss didn’t keep his promise of promoting me”

This might be a genuine reason for wanting to change jobs. If you were promised a promotion but never got it, you definitely won’t be very happy.

The question however is, why didn’t he honor his promise?

Obviously, since you’re “hurting” from the broken promise, you are not considering your boss’ perspective.

At the same time, the answer itself shows that you feel you are owed the promotion simply because it was a promise. That’s okay, but remember that promotions are given on merit.

Is it possible that there was a condition tied to the promotion and you never fulfilled it to your boss’ satisfaction?

That’s a very big possibility because any interviewer will assume that you never qualified for the promotion.

This answer implies that you might be the kind of employee who’s only focused on the benefits. You are not focused as much on the work which needs to be done to get the benefits.

“I have been given unrealistic and unachievable targets”

Remember the rule of thumb that you should never be negative?

Well, this possibly-true answer is full of negativity. It’s possibly true because there are industries where the competition is very high and a lot is demanded from the employees.

All the same, the negativity is not excusable.

If you view your targets as unrealistic, it means you don’t like them. You will therefore have no internal motivation to work towards them.

But that’s not all. You also find the targets unachievable?

If the targets were only unrealistic, you could decide to do whatever you could and give the results you got. But if you’ve decided that they are unachievable, your mind is not going to want to do anything about them.

Candidates with a negative attitude towards work are rarely attractive to hiring managers. Their negativity results in them not being hired.

“My job is no longer interesting”

What is the definition of “interesting” according to you? Does the interviewer hold the same opinion? In case she doesn’t, and that’s the likelihood, then you’re on your own.

It can be an unfortunate conclusion but this answer can be taken to mean that you’re not mature enough. Maturity comes with responsibility and the responsible person ensures that what he wants, he works towards.

Translating that to the workplace, if your job is no longer interesting, then it’s your responsibility to make it interesting again. Either bring in what existed before or something new to make it interesting again.

The bottom line is that you can’t abandon a responsibility simply because the process is not interesting. If you dedicate the time and effort, you can make your work interesting.

This answer paints the picture of a potential complainer. You might be the kind of employee who expects the difficult work to be done for you. If your work is not simple and fun, then you’re not interested.

Do you then have the right understanding of what work is all about? Are you aware that there is an effort to be put in before you enjoy good results?

“I’m not being paid what I deserve”

Pay and benefits are often the reason why many seek to change jobs. You work somewhere for a certain period and expect that you’ll rise up the ranks. With the rise, you’ll get a better pay as well as more benefits.

What if that doesn’t happen?

This is quite like the answer about being promoted. And with the word “deserve” in the sentence, you show that you’re actually being mistreated. Maybe even abused. Your rights are being infringed on.

Anything which you deserve is something you should be getting, right?

The big question is, from whose perspective are you talking?

In any organization, the person who determines what you deserve to be paid is either HR or your immediate manager. The HR might set a standard based on the market while your immediate manager might propose a figure based on your skills or contribution to the team.

This answer however doesn’t provide the input of your HR or immediate manager. It then becomes difficult to be sure whether you truly deserve the pay you’re talking about.

HOW TO ANSWER THE QUESTION RIGHT

In reading the above responses to the question about changing jobs, what do you conclude?

Among your conclusions, you might have realized that your choice of words matters.

And for your choice of words to have an element of truth and flow well with your body language, you need to have some answers as a guide on how to respond to the question.

Remember that interviews are supposed to be conversational. Do not choose one answer and memorize it. Rather, use these as guides and see how to apply them to your own situation.

“I’m looking for new challenges”

One of the ways growth and progress comes is through being stretched.

The most common way for you to be stretched is by handling challenges.

When your current job is no longer challenging, you might become apathetic.

This is especially if you’re the kind of person who loves solving problems.

So instead of telling your interviewer how your job has become boring, try telling her that you’re looking for more challenges.

“I want career growth”

Just as challenges get you to grow, you can also desire career growth through available openings. Maybe your current employer doesn’t have any available higher positions.

For example, you might be working as a branch manager in a retail chain. You joined the company as a cashier and have risen up the ranks to head an outlet.

Being the branch manager, there are only two people above you. They are the regional manager and the managing director, who is the business owner.

In such a situation, there may be no room for a promotion. The only thing you’re getting is more benefits and an annual bonus for hitting targets.

You can then tell your interviewer that you’re looking for opportunities for career growth.

“I want to learn new skills”

You may feel that you want to do something a bit different. Maybe you just rediscovered an interest you forgot you had.

Deciding to pursue it, you realize that you’ll need an enabling environment. You’ll need to learn the skills required so as to be good in your new interest. You’ll also need a place to apply the skills.

The answer you give here will have to show the connection between your new interest and the position you’re interviewing for. This way, you can show that your desire for new skills is what drives your decision to move.

“I want to apply my new skills in this position”

In other cases, you may have acquired new skills which are not applicable to your current position. Maybe it’s a situation like the one mentioned above where you recently discovered an interest.

You went ahead and did some courses and graduated. Since you want to make use of these new skills, you looked for a job that gives you such an opportunity.

During the interview, you can give this reason.

While doing so, you’ll also have to explain why you decided to pursue an interest which isn’t aligned to your current job.

You could say that you love your current job and pursuing this new interest did not interfere in any way with your job.

And maybe to prove it, despite the new interest existing for some years before giving it considerable attention, you had done courses related to your current job.

You also paid for the courses yourself, graduated and implemented the new skills to the company.

“I want more responsibilities”

Still on growth, you can say that you want to grow through having more responsibilities. In giving this answer, you’ll have to show that you have previously handled responsibilities well.

If you’ve already been asked about a time in your life when you showed leadership, you can reference that answer if it’s work related. But to increase your chances, use another example but connect it with the one already mentioned.

That will serve to remind the interviewer about your leadership skills.

Moreover, with this answer, you’ll be showing that you’re capable of more. You are thus a potential asset to the company if they pick you.

“I like this company”

You can also decide to focus on the company you’re interviewing for and not your current job. This can be a great answer, especially if the interview is going well.

Take this opportunity to speak some good things about the company you’re hoping to join. Use the information you gathered during your research to show that you know the company and are basing your decision on facts.

Some of the things you can base your answer on is the direction the company is taking. You can also mention some of the achievements they have and connect that to your interest.

Just make sure you don’t sound like you’re only looking for greener pasture. Remember to show that you will be adding value to the company upon being hired.

“There are pending layoffs”

Due to high competition, many mergers and acquisitions happen. In worse cases, companies get shut and employees become jobless.

If this happens and you’re about to become jobless, you can be honest about it. If the information about your company is in the public domain, it becomes easier and more reasonable to say this.

Still, do not fail to say something good about your current job. Let it be known that you are a positive employee who can contribute to a great workplace culture.

“The company is restructuring”

At times, mergers and acquisitions won’t cause joblessness but some restructuring. Restructuring can also be as a result of other measures the company is taking to remain competitive.

The management at your current job could have decided to change people’s roles or move them to different offices.

Whatever the case, this is also an acceptable reason to give.

While remaining positive, show how the restructuring is going to affect you. Help your interviewer understand that in changing jobs, you’re just seeking to remain true to your career interests.

“I’m seeking a better work-life balance”

This is a big answer that despite being acceptable, needs to be framed well.

If you are being interviewed by Gen Xers, then the term work-life balance will strike a chord with them. Gen Xers, or Generation X, are the people born between 1965 and 1980.

The idea of having a balance between work and other aspects of life is important to this generation. And if you can show how you believe in it, especially if you are not a Gen Xer yourself, you can gain some points.

CONCLUSION

Being asked why you’re changing jobs is normal. Since the question will surely come up, it’s best to be prepared for it. From among your reservations with your current employer, pick one and adapt any of these answers to it.

Remember the rule of thumb: do not be negative. Always say something positive about your employer, whether current or past.

How to Answer the Question 'Why do you want to change jobs?'

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Why Do You Want to Leave Your Current Job? Sample Answers ...

30-06-2021 · One very important question that many job seekers seldom prepare for during an interview is answering the question, “Why do you want to leave your current job?” This may also be asked as “Why are you looking for a job?” or even “What would you change about your current role?”. This question can make the most seasoned interviewee squirm a little because of the first word; why.

30-06-2021

One very important question that many job seekers seldom prepare for during an interview is answering the question, “Why do you want to leave your current job?”

This may also be asked as “Why are you looking for a job?” or even “What would you change about your current role?”

This question can make the most seasoned interviewee squirm a little because of the first word; why. A question starting with “why” immediately places you on the defensive.

If there is anything that is dissatisfying about your current position, this is where you might unwittingly share that information and unintentionally emit a negative vibe — a VERY bad impression to make.

Best Reasons for “Why Do You Want to Leave Your Current Job?”

The most effective and acceptable reasons for leaving your current job are positive — not negative — and relate to moving forward in your life or career.

Some of the most common, and easiest to explain, reasons for leaving a job include:

  • Desire to learn.
  • Desire to take on more responsibility.
  • Desire to take on less responsibility.
  • Desire to relocate.
  • Desire for a career change.
  • Desire to gain a new skill or grow a current skill.
  • Company reorganization has led to change in job content.
  • Desire for a shorter commute to work.
  • Desire to improve work/life balance.

When answering this question, it’s easy to think about all of the things you dislike about your current job, but don’t go there.

Look Forward in Your Response to the Question of “Why Do You Want to Leave Your Current Job?”

Unless you are part of a well-publicized corporate implosion (e.g. Enron) or reorganization, stay positive in your response. Start by responding with “What I really like about this job and company that is different from my current one is…”

Take the opportunity to share what you’ve learned about the potential new company (demonstrating your interest in the opportunity). Talk about the environment and culture of this company, and how you feel it’s a strong match with your strengths and experience.

Demonstrating your buy-in to this potential employer’s brand and culture is a good way to sell yourself as a match.

  • Talk specifically about the job for which you are currently interviewing.
  • Show excitement about the opportunity to learn some new skills and adapt to change.
  • Focus on your strengths and what you will bring to the employer.
  • Make sure you take time to describe your accomplishments, and all of the good that you’ve done for your current employer.

Most importantly, demonstrate that you are dignified and professional and will not talk disparagingly about another company or boss.

Don’t Be Negative About Your Current Job or Employer During Interview Questions

According to several resources, the number one reason most people voluntarily leave one position for another is because of a bad boss or supervisor. There may be a combination of reasons as to why you want to leave this job, but most all of them will likely tie back to poor management or a bad supervisor.

So, knowing that you shouldn’t say anything negative regarding a company or individual supervisor in an interview, how should you answer this question?

If you speak poorly of a company or boss during an interview, what proof does the potentially new employer have to believe that you wouldn’t say the same thing to a customer or coworker in the new company? Everyone knows that would be bad for business.

Sample Answers to “Why Do You Want to Leave Your Current Job?”

It’s best to avoid going down the slippery slope of discussing specifics regarding compensation, poor management, company finances, poor morale, or any other negative aspect of the job.

You can gloss over negative information by focusing on the future and staying positive, stating something like:

  • I want to build on one of the aspects that I like most about the work I currently am doing…
  • One of the things that has made things a little more challenging is that I’d like to have a platform where I could share my ideas and offer up ways to improve…(service, operations, technology, communication, etc…)

Using phrases like that still keeps the mood positive, but allows the employer to read between the lines. It also shows that you want to contribute positively to the success of your employer.

You can also just share your interest in this opportunity by saying something like:

  • I am interested in learning more about (something this job includes), and this job provides an opportunity to leverage my current areas of expertise and increase my skills in…
  • Your focus here is on (something that you like), and I really enjoy doing (whatever that is). So, I expect to increase my enjoyment of my work when I am able to focus more on (that aspect of the job).
  • I enjoy working as part of a team and am looking for an opportunity to work on an interesting project. This job is part of a team working on a fascinating project, and I would love to join in this work.

You can demonstrate your interest in this new employer by saying:

  • I’ve enjoyed working with a great group of people at my current employer, but this opportunity in this company fits very well with the direction I want to take my career. 
  • I’ve learned a great deal in my current job, but I’m interested in working at [name of employer] based on the great things I have learned about this organization.
  • This job has been a great experience, but growth is limited because the company is relatively small. So, to continue to grow, I need to look elsewhere, and working in this this opportunity looks very interesting to me because…

Be honest, positive, and frame your response in a way that includes the job you are interviewing for.

Bottom Line on Answering “Why Are You Leaving Your Current Job?”

If asked why do you want to leave your current job, remember to keep it positive, promote yourself and your accomplishments, and follow the old adage of “if you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.”

Answering the Common Job Interview Questions:

Questions About You:

Handling Special Career Situations:

Questions About Them:

Questions for You to Ask Them:

Interview Preparation:

About the author…

Beth Colley CEO/owner of Chesapeake Career Management Services has guided over 1,200 job seekers to career success since joining the careers industry in January of 2000. She is a Certified Master Resume Writer, a Certified Career Management Coach, and a Certified Brain Based Success Coach and an active member of Career Directors International, The National Resume Writers Association, and Career Thought Leaders.

Why Career Change? Interview Question and Answers

All of the above answers will impress an interviewer and successfully answer those tough questions about why you’re looking to change careers. There are a couple of mistakes to always avoid, though, so let’s go over each mistake now. First, always address the question head-on. The interviewer will feel uncomfortable offering you the position if you seem to be dodging this question, unprepared to …

Why Career Change- Interview Question and Answers

Any time you look to make a career change, you’ll face the interview question “Why are you changing careers?”

And if you aren’t prepared to answer, it can result in job rejections and potential failure in your job search.

As a former recruiter, I’m going to share:

  • How to answer the “Why career change?” interview question (and why employers ask this)
  • 9 good reasons for a career change
  • 4 word-for-word sample interview answers to why you want a new career
  • Mistakes to avoid when answering career change interview questions

Why Employers Ask This Interview Question

Employers ask interview questions about why you’re making a career change because they want to understand your career goals.

In a job interview, they aren’t just looking to see if you can perform their job well; they want to know if you’re likely to stay long-term and enjoy the job.

And the more you can show them that you have solid, well-thought-out reasons for changing careers, the more comfortable they’ll be in hiring you.

If you seem unsure, they’re less likely to hire you into their organization.

They also want to make sure you’ve researched and taken time to understand this new career/industry you’re looking to join.

They aren’t going to hire you if you don’t seem like you understand the work and challenges that you’ll face.

Finally, they’re hoping to get a sense of whether you performed well in your past career or not.

If you tell an employer, “I’m looking to switch into a different career because I’ve been getting poor performance reviews in my current job,” they’ll worry that you may struggle to perform well in their job, too.

So as you answer this question, it’s best to focus on the favorable aspects you hope to gain in your next role, and don’t talk too much about the negatives of your past industry.

The only exception is if your industry is struggling as a whole and facing layoffs, reduced opportunities, etc. You’ll see this in the example answers coming up.

Let’s look at how to answer this question now…

How to Answer “Why Career Change?” in a Job Interview

When you face interview questions like, “Why are you looking to change careers?” you should address the question head-on with one or two clear reasons.

Avoid badmouthing your current job, employer, or industry, and instead, focus on what you hope to gain in your next career path.

You can talk about how it’s more in-line with what you’re passionate about or interested in, how you feel it’s a better industry for future growth and job security, or how you’ve always wanted to be a part of this industry and finally feel it’s the right time to change careers now.

Also, highlight any ways in which your skills and experience from previous jobs will be relevant to the new career you’re pursuing.

If you can point out how your past work will help you succeed in this new job, it’ll make the interviewer feel better about offering you the position. And it’ll also explain why you want to change to this new career or job.

Also, it’s best if you point out one specific career you’re pursuing now in your job search. If you tell the interviewer that you’re looking at five different new careers, it’s going to cast doubt about whether you know what you want.

I’ll discuss this more in the “mistakes” section later in this article.

To recap, there isn’t one “right” answer here but you need to be direct and head-on. Avoid badmouthing, and stay positive in your answer.

Don’t worry if you’re still not sure what to say for why you’re changing careers. Coming up, I’ll give you sample reasons for why you want to change career, and word-for-word interview answer examples.

Why Make a Career Change? 9 Good Reasons

  1. More opportunities for long-term career growth and higher pay.
  2. Personal interest/passion in an area.
  3. Make a bigger social or community impact.
  4. Uncertainty about the long-term prospects of your current industry. (This isn’t considered badmouthing if you simply share your unemotional observations about the industry in general.)
  5. Seeking new challenges and personal growth.
  6. Taking a job that is better suited to your skills, experience, and/or personality.
  7. Following colleagues from a previous company who have made a successful career change and have recommended this new job/career to you.
  8. Higher salary potential. (It’s best to combine this with another reason above.)
  9. Starting a new career that’s more aligned with your idea of your “dream job.”

4 Example Answers to “Why Are You Changing Careers?”

Example Answer 1:

I want to change my career path for future growth potential and new challenges. I feel my skills and experience will transfer well into this new career. For example, I saw your job description mentions communication with clients and the ability to lead projects, which were key parts of my last job. And overall, I’ve received career advice from a few colleagues who have successfully made this same career change and recommended it as a way to grow, earn more in their career, and find new challenges.

This is a great answer to “Why make a career change?” for a few reasons.

You’re pointing out your relevant skills and experience.

You’re mentioning a few colleagues who have successfully made this change, which will put the hiring manager’s mind at ease about whether you’ll “work out” in this new career.

And you’re explaining your personal reasons for wanting this new career path… such as higher potential for career growth and earnings.

This is a solid interview answer to why you are looking to change careers. Let’s look at more examples.

Example Answer 2:

My current industry is struggling and I feel this industry has many overlaps with my current industry and role, so I’ll be able to use my skills quickly to contribute, rather than having to start over and learn from scratch. For example, in my current role, I manage projects for four to five large clients at a time and use many of the skills listed on your job posting, like leading teams, leading meetings, and interacting with clients to provide progress reports and updates. So I see this as a way to shift into a healthier, more stable industry while also keeping my relevant skills and being able to hit the ground running in my next position.

Notice how this answer is positive and direct. 

It also shows how you’ll be able to perform well for this employer based on your previous work experience.

All of these factors make this a good answer that will impress the typical company.

Example Answer 3:

I’m looking to change careers to join a company that’s more aligned with my personal interest and passion for community service. I want to make a positive impact, not just help a company generate profits, and I love that your company has a focus on social impact and responsibility to the community. I read about this in detail on your website and a few of your latest press releases and it’s one of the main reasons I wanted to apply for the position.

Example Answer 4:

Two colleagues from my previous company changed from the finance industry to the tech industry and have said they’ve found the work to be more exciting and fulfilling. They’ve convinced me that it’s a worthwhile career move, and since I have similar interests and motivation to those two colleagues, I’m confident I’ll enjoy working for a company in tech. That’s the entire focus of my job search now, and I’m not applying to any finance companies. I’m not unhappy in finance; I just feel tech would be more exciting and more aligned with my passions.

Mistakes to Avoid in Your Answer

All of the above answers will impress an interviewer and successfully answer those tough questions about why you’re looking to change careers.

There are a couple of mistakes to always avoid, though, so let’s go over each mistake now.

First, always address the question head-on. The interviewer will feel uncomfortable offering you the position if you seem to be dodging this question, unprepared to answer, or uncomfortable answering.

Practice and prepare a direct answer ahead of time.

Don’t ever go into the interview unprepared or unsure how you’ll answer this question because you’re not likely to come up with a great answer on the spot.

Next, don’t sound unsure of your decision to leave your previous industry and job. You need to sell yourself by sounding confident in your choice.

You can re-read the end of the fourth example answer above to see how to do this. In the second half of that answer, you’re showing the interviewer that your entire focus is on joining this new industry, and you have no hesitations about your decision.

Employers don’t want to hire someone who may change their mind after three months and decide to search for another position. So you need to sound less risky, and you do this by showing that you’re sure about your decision to search for a new career.

Finally, as mentioned earlier, never badmouth in your job interview. Always sound positive and focus on what you’ll gain in this next job and career.

Even if an interviewer asks you, “Why do you want to leave your current job?” it’s not an invitation to badmouth.

Conclusion: Answering Why You’re Changing Careers

Answering questions about why you’re changing careers doesn’t need to be stressful.

Practice ahead of time, stay positive, and address the question directly.

Show employers that you have strong reasons for making a career change and you’ll get more job offers.

And don’t apologize for wanting to make a change! It’s not bad to be targeting a new direction in your job search.

You simply need to be ready to confidently answer the interview questions that you’ll face on this topic, because employers will ask.

Your interviewer may have even changed careers in the past (you can research them on LinkedIn to see if this is the case).

They’re not asking to trick you or trap you; they just want to know your motivations and reasons.

Motivation to change: 12 good reasons to change jobs.

26-04-2020 · Here are 12 examples that I believe every applicant can truthfully disclose as a reason for changing jobs. They are examples as ideas and clues for you to think about your own personal motivation to change and to be aware that the answer to this question is not dangerous, but is very important for you and your next job.

26-04-2020
Motivation to Change

“Why do you want to change jobs?” Applicants have to answer this question at least in the interview at the latest. The question of motivation to change. The answer may allow conclusions to be drawn about the previous employment relationship, but should in particular clarify the expectations regarding the new job. Many applicants fear exactly this topic in the cover letter and also in conversation, because: »How do I say that I no longer got on with the boss? Can I write that I have been dismissed for operational reasons? How can I cleverly disguise why I actually wanted to leave? «My perspective: As an applicant, clarify and say what is going on!

Stop! Not the way you might think now: say that the bad colleagues bullied you. That you were lost in the bitch war with your boss or that you were tired of the boss’s eternal macho behavior. That she’s been boring the job for years. That you didn’t get any further and were no longer interested in lifelong internship status. That you felt like something new and the new job is so conveniently around the corner …

This is how you convince as an applicant when it comes to motivation to change

Motivation is motivation. And motives have something to do with your goals. Motives drive you, they are the intention behind your goal. They let you burn for something you really want. Either it is the achievement of a certain goal or the way there that motivates you. It’s about the future. What appeals to you about the new and what are you particularly looking forward to? What do you associate with the change of employer?

But when I talk to applicants about their motivation to change, most of them are mentally moving away from the world. They list reasons why the last employer no longer fit and they urgently had to leave there. Are you interested in a new employer?

Gossip from the ex?

Yes, he is certainly interested, but that belongs more in the gossip category. It is clear that you shouldn’t put something like this on the table:

My boss, Mr. Müller, just shouted at me all the time.

I was just bored lately and nobody noticed.

Everyone is trying to get out of THE shop.

They make fun of their customers. I don’t want that anymore!

My affair with my colleague came out, it was really embarrassing.

For the future boss, this is certainly all interesting information about the applicant and especially about the old employer. Especially when both companies come from the same industry and are competitors in the market. Who doesn’t want to tap hot insider information about the competition through the good little bird applicant?

I’m not telling you anything new, that of course you should n’t say something like that. The rule “Don’t speak badly about the ex-employer as an applicant!” Still applies.

Yesterday’s snow doesn’t matter for the future.

In a coaching apprenticeship, I learned the clever sentence “The solution doesn’t matter why a problem arises.” Problem and solution are – purely methodologically – independent of each other.

Of course, we like to talk about problems and often speaking about them also fulfills certain therapeutic purposes of reflection and processing. However, it is not absolutely necessary for the solution and therefore the next step to understand the way into the problem.

And it is the same with motivation to change. Applying to a new employer is the next step for you. Part of the solution, i.e. your personal idea of ​​the future.

You have thought about what type of career you are and which employer or activity suits you, makes you happy or is good for your professional and personal development. That is your solution. Why you couldn’t stand it with the old employer or why there were certain problems, in the end, is not part of your solution and is actually irrelevant for the future-oriented motivation to change.

Here are 12 examples that I believe every applicant can truthfully disclose as a reason for changing jobs. They are examples as ideas and clues for you to think about your own personal motivation to change and to be aware that the answer to this question is not dangerous, but is very important for you and your next job.

Plain text for applicants: 12 examples of your motivation to switch

6 completely uncritical change motifs

The first 6 change motifs should be absolutely uncritical. You are explaining reasons for your change, which are obvious and well-known for decision-makers in the company today. Important: Don’t let your motivation to switch act like a justification or even an excuse. Instead, make it tangible and concrete for your counterpart: Give examples and say what this change motif means in concrete terms for you and which goals you personally – and not one! – connect with it:

  1. I would like to develop professionally / personally / learn new things.
    Which development opportunities are particularly important to you and why do you think that they will be possible with exactly this employer? What are your interests and what is the goal of learning new things?
  2. I want to get to know a new industry.
    What exactly do you like about this industry? Why is changing the industry a good development step for you personally? What do you gain from this? Why is the new company a good choice in this industry?
  3. I want to work in a different work environment.
    What exactly is your dream work environment? Are there other structures or dimensions (group / start-up / medium-sized company)? Or the office situation? Or the colleagues? What do you need for a good work environment and why do you think you will find it there?
  4. I want to work more in an international context.
    Many employees want that! International smells of more money and an aspiring career. So: why is it so important for YOU? If it’s the money and you hope to get there faster, yes, why not say that too? Perhaps you are also eager to finally be able to use your language skills again? Or do you feel like traveling? Or would you like to fill a position abroad sooner or later and are looking for the right springboard in an international company? Not so bad that you can’t say that, right?
  5. I feel like new challenges.
    This is actually the applicant slime platitude par excellence. Here too, the real motivation to change becomes clear when you explain what “new challenges” mean for you. Are there perhaps new tasks that you have never done before? Are they larger projects or more employees to be led? If challenges are important to you as a value in the job, make yourself aware of when this value would be fulfilled for you in the next job.
  6. I want to change for family reasons.
    Your partner starts a new job and you have decided to move to another city together. Other family reasons can also be the reason why you want to change your career. Most of these change motifs should be easy to communicate. Nevertheless, think about what you want to reveal from your private life when you first get to know it and thus explain your motivation to change.

6 critical motifs of change today and why you should say what is going on here too.

These are examples of change motifs in which the opposite side could possibly misunderstand you. But here, too, I stick to it: with a real, personal reasoning, you disclose what is really important to you. How to create the clarity that is important for you in the new job – should you get it – for you personally and also for your new employer:

  1. I want to spend less time on the job and more time with X (e.g. the family).
    It is clear that you will immediately throw yourself out of the race with some jobs. Wherever overtime is the norm. But then you wouldn’t have applied there either. If you’ve worked like a madman for the past 20 years and you’ve now realized that other things are important besides your job, then this is an important finding. You will only be happy with your next employer if you get exactly this freedom in your job. So create clarity – right from the start.
  2. I no longer want to lead employees and instead deal with X more.
    The step back from a leadership position is still often interpreted as a step backward or failure. In a few years’ time it will look very different, I predict. From my point of view, the following also applies here: Clarify why this step is so important to you. What do you gain if you take this supposed setback and see it as an opportunity? As your new employer, you would break open doors with me with this “self-awareness” because you have reflected on your life, are aware of your goals and know your way. Many decision-makers in the company are certainly ticking differently here today, but even then the motto is: with this motivation to change, look to see if this employer is the right one for you.
  3. I want to work for a big brand.
    With this motivation, status and recognition are probably important to you. Here too, turn your naive wish into real motivation. What exactly do you associate with a brand manufacturer and specifically with this brand? Why is it important for you to work in this environment? Don’t fall into honey to smear the beard. It is not about proving to the company how great it is, but about your very personal perspective and what is behind this professional goal.
  4. I want to move big/high.
    Moving things, creating new things and having the necessary freedom to make decisions and take action is very important to many employees today. A frequent motivation to change especially experienced specialists and managers who have been slowed down in their last job. This is a very legitimate motive and a positive message provided the new employer has a real interest in such active, creative and solution-oriented employees. Attention! Applicants who want to go high or create great things can very easily be arrogant or overqualified appear in the conversation, even scare the future boss. Not that you want to saw on his chair! Here, clarity with instinct is required.
  5. I want a safe job.
    Safety is important to many employees. Security is often associated with money. Even if hardly any job is really safe until retirement today, there are of course employers and industries in which the motive of security is more fulfilled than with others. So: Why is security so important to you? What does security mean to you? What distinguishes a safe job? Why do you think that is exactly what applies to this position or to this company? Attention! The desire for security could also put the stamp of the time absentee, loafers or the conservative boredom. A drawer that you certainly don’t want to be put in. It is all the more important that you actively clarify what you associate with safety and how it affects your motivation to work.
  6. I want to make more money.
    Yes, this motivation is also often the impetus to change jobs, especially for younger employees, because this is the only way they see an opportunity to make bigger salary jumps. Even if many people have a problem with materialistic claims for themselves, money still stands for freedom, security, and independence. Leaving an employer simply because it is no longer possible and the salary level is clearly higher in the same job in another company or another branch is a clear motivation to change. In my experience, addressing this should not kick you out of the race either. I would, however, list other, more content-related / subject-oriented motifs here, so that they are not reduced to just the money.

Canceled! Because it was time to separate.

What to do if your employer has fired you? I often meet applicants who have been dismissed for operational reasons and this is also documented in the certificate. Sometimes it is the dissolution of an entire location, sometimes the relocation of parts of the production abroad. The bottom line is always “ran stupid”. And even though they didn’t let themselves get into debt, many of them feel like losers and losers.

Logically, this situation is not pleasant and I can understand that it causes frustration and a feeling of helplessness. But with regard to the communication strategy towards a new employer, I believe that the best way is to use plain language: “Yes, I was fired for operational reasons because …” Just and only in this way can you clarify that you have not stolen golden spoons or noticed by your poor performance.

If you were not fired for operational reasons, but because you performed poorly and did not achieve your agreed goals, then it is certainly difficult to communicate to a new employer. Here I recommend actively focusing on the future and drawing attention to the positive motives for changing above. If your partner does not give up, explain that your employer and you have split up, but stick to the truth. Without chatting out of the box, you can show what conclusions you have drawn from the termination for yourself and your future. Perhaps you also openly address your weaknesses as development potential in your new job. What will you do differently at your next employer?

If you have given notice of termination yourself, explain briefly and factually the background why it was no longer suitable for you. Here you can quickly talk about your motives for a change and thus about the future, but please without warming up the past months with the old employer. It just wasn’t fitting anymore, the values ​​and goals of employers and employees can diverge over time. With your termination, you have decided to change something.

There was still something! What else you wanted to know …

For your personal change motifs, it is not only important that you bring them across authentically and with life, but also that you can estimate yourself based on the reactions of the company representatives whether your motives and goals, which you associate with the change, in this Job and also to be fulfilled in this work environment:

  • Will you be able to develop in this position with this boss?
  • Will you really be able to work internationally?
  • Will the new job really offer you real challenges?
  • Will you have more family time again?
  • Is your decision to relinquish leadership truly accepted?
  • Will you have a chance to actually make a difference?
  • Does the position offer you the form of security that is so important to you?

My tip: Before starting the interview, think about which questions in connection with your motivation to change are important to you in order to receive exactly this information.

It is only half the battle if you are aware of your motivation to change and can sell it perfectly, but are not able to assess whether you will actually get what you expect from a change of job with your new employer.

(Photo credit: 123rf.com, 22087247 , alphaspirit)

Dr. Bernd Slaghuis

I work as a career and business coach in Cologne and have specialized in topics related to career planning and professional reorientation. I work with applicants on their application strategy, the optimization of their documents and the preparation for interviews. I support managers in finding a healthy basic attitude. I write outside of this blog for various career and management magazines and was named “Top Mind 2019” by XING.

Why are you looking for a job change

11-11-2019 · These reasons show that you are focused on your career plan and growth instead of just looking out to leave a bad work situation. Willingness to develop new skills. Need to relocate. Plan to learn, grow and explore new opportunities. Desire to get more new responsibilities and job role.

11-11-2019

FirstNaukri 2019-11-11 44,552 views

One of the most critical interview questions that interviewers ask job seekers is, “Why are you looking for a job change?” This interview question can also be asked in a different style such as:

“Why do you want to leave your current job?”

“Why you want to switch your job?”

Hiring managers are always curious to ask this challenging interview question as a part of the final selection process. Therefore, to help you ace this HR interview question, let’s first understand why hiring managers ask this.

Why Interviewers Ask this Question?

Every question a hiring manager asks during the interview has something to do with figuring out if you are a right candidate for the job. This particular question helps hiring managers to know the reasons you are willing to leave your current job. Do you have the desire to grow or you want to quit due to your workplace challenges, or any other reasons that are not much welcomed by recruiters.

Therefore, we suggest you to practice this interview question beforehand and win the show!

How You Should Respond?

The best way to answer the interview question, “Why are you looking for a job change?” is to focus on positive reasons that are easy to explain. Giving negative responses such as a nagging boss or work pressure should be avoided at any cost.        

 Also Read: How to write a formal email for your job application

 Positive Responses:

Sharing positive responses like willingness to find a better opportunity, new challenging roles and career growth are acceptable by hiring managers. These reasons show that you are focused on your career plan and growth instead of just looking out to leave a bad work situation.

  • Willingness to develop new skills
  • Need to relocate
  • Plan to learn, grow and explore new opportunities
  • Desire to get more new responsibilities and job role

Negative Responses:

According to several surveys, one of the common reasons why many professionals leave their current job is because of a bad supervisor. This can definitely be true for you, but sharing reasons like a bad boss, long work hours, low salary and biased promotions should not be shared with a hiring manager. Although there is no problem in aiming for a higher salary, however, stating a low salary as a key reason for your job change will show your instability in the new company.

If you say unfavorable things about your previous organization or bosses in a job interview, there will be no assurance for the hiring manager that you will not crib about any such issues in the future also and again leave the new company. So, here are some possible reasons you should avoid sharing at any cost:

    • Do not like the company and its people
    • Want to earn more
    • Do not like the job
    • Do not like the long work hours

Therefore, stay positive in your response when answering this important interview question. Start by mentioning what you like about the new company and how you plan to see these things in your new organization. Also, sharing something from the new job role and responsibilities offered, you can tell the hiring manager how exciting you find these responsibilities and want to be a part of it.

Here are some winning sample answers for the interview question, “Why are you looking for a job change?” You can use the below mentioned ideas and create a customized answer as per your requirement:

Sample 1: I am willing to learn more about (mention a skill or task the new job includes. I’m sure this job will give me an opportunity to develop new skills and also leverage my current skills and expertise…

Sample 2: I am looking out for an opportunity that allows me to work on interesting as well as challenging projects. Since this company is known for launching new products and services every year, I would like to be a part of the company and learn more…

Sample 3: My skills and qualifications seem to be a perfect match with the job requirements of your company. Therefore, this presents the right time for me to upgrade my skills and gain more exposure in a new industry your company is involved in…

Get prepared to answer other interview questions: 10 Common Interview Questions & Answers

Actively looking out for a job? Advance your job search with Firstnaukri online resume maker and get a professional resume in minutes!

All the best.

How Should I Answer "Why Are You Looking For A Job Change ...

06-12-2019 · “Why are you looking for a job change?” is a reasonable question for a person making a job change to hear during a job interview. But how honest should you be? Saying that you are escaping a bad boss, or want more money, or simply want a new job is not going to sell your career story to a hiring manager. “Sometimes people can be a little too honest. Then you get down into the weeds about ...

06-12-2019

“Why are you looking for a job change?” is a reasonable question for a person making a job change to hear during a job interview. But how honest should you be? Saying that you are escaping a bad boss, or want more money, or simply want a new job is not going to sell your career story to a hiring manager.

“Sometimes people can be a little too honest. Then you get down into the weeds about how you didn’t like your boss,” said Ashley Watkins, a job search coach with corporate recruiting experience. “[Hiring managers] are looking for red flags, but they are also looking to see whether or not your intention or your goals align with what they see for the department.“

Answering this question takes tact and the ability to make your previous job skills applicable to the role you are applying for. HuffPost talked with human resources experts and career coaches on how candidates should prepare for this question.

You can be tempted to point fingers at your toxic work culture or unreasonable bosses as your reason for seeking a new job. But that makes the job interview about them, not about you.

If you are asked why you are leaving a job and it’s because of your bad boss, you can “make a general comment about differing points of view, different managerial styles or different visions related to how certain work should be accomplished,” said Lori Rassas, a career coach and the author of “Employment Law: A Guide to Hiring, Managing, and Firing for Employers and Employees.”

Watkins said the language for someone in this position can sound like “you took the job and it ended up being a mismatch between your core values and that of the company, or the direction that the company was shifting into. Now you’re focusing on finding roles that will more closely match your core values and align with your skills and your strengths, because you bring X Y Z value,” she said. “Tell what it is, but quickly shift away from it. You don’t want to get in the blame game.“

If you need help watching what you say, Rassas said job seekers should answer this question “as if every single person you are referencing in your answer is sitting in the chair next to you in the interview room,” because you should not be saying comments you would not say directly to them.

“Looking for new growth opportunities” is not enough of an answer for why you want a job change. You need to elaborate on why this potential employer is the best place for you to grow.

Point to specific skills you have developed and want to learn, and explain why this new employer is the best opportunity to use those skills. Do your homework and see if this new company can give you projects that your current job cannot, and you can make that part of your answer.

“If the prospective employer has a practice group, or a client, or works on projects that are different than your employer, you could refer to the fact that you want to broaden your expertise by applying your skills to new areas that are not available with your current company,” Rassas said.

Be warned that wanting more career growth can turn off some hiring managers, because it could be a sign that you see this job as a stepping stone. Rassas said it could signal that you are not committed to the company and “are planning to move from role to role every few years as soon as their immediate needs are not met.” Some hiring managers are seeking stability, and want to know their employee will be able to build relationships with clients in the long term, Watkins said.

“For career changers, the goal is to “draw the parallels between the value of what you were doing and how it will positively impact the target company.””

Don’t lead with what you do not have when answering why you are making a big career switch. Watkins said a big mistake candidates make is leading with: “‘Well, I know I don’t have the background for this position,’” because then “all I’m focusing on now is you fall short of what I’m looking for.”

Your skills in a previous industry can actually be more applicable than you think. Watkins cited a client that she helped make the switch from classroom teacher to nurse. “We positioned her as someone who had gotten the core of what she wanted to do as a teacher,” They did that by highlighting how her conflict-resolution and people skills, as well as her patience, could be applied to the health care industry.

For career changers, the goal is to “draw the parallels between the value of what you were doing and how it will positively impact the target company,” Watkins said.

Even if you are not in the career you want right now, hiring managers want to hear how you have been preparing yourself for the switch, said Karen Gureghian, a human resources consultant for HR Business Partners.

In the interview, you could say that you knew you wanted to get into the new field, and explain how you tried to prepare yourself for the switch by gaining skills in your current job.

That kind of thoughtful answer “shows that you’re being proactive and you’re trying to advance yourself without being told,” Gureghian said.

Ten Ways to Explain Why You Want to Change Jobs

30-07-2010 · I'm job-hunting and I need to be able to tell people why I want to leave my job. I've gone as far as I can go in this organization and I'm also pay-limited, but I don't think I …

30-07-2010

I'm job-hunting and I need to be able to tell people why I want to leave my job. I've gone as far as I can go in this organization and I'm also pay-limited, but I don't think I want to say those two things exactly. Any advice?

It is fine to say "I had reached a plateau in that job" or "I felt that I'd grown as much as I ever would in that organization." Here are ten more reasons

for leaving a job, expressed in Don't Say and Do Say versions:

TEN REASONS FOR LEAVING A JOB: "DO SAY" AND "DON'T SAY" VERSIONS

My boss is Lord Voldemort.

I'm looking to work more independently in my next job, in a company that needs
people who can figure out what to do and do it.

I wasn't going to be able to grow in that job.

I'm very big on looking at my work and figuring out smarter ways to do it. I'm pretty flexible for the most part, I think, but mindless scutwork drives me crazy, and I'm looking for an organization that is oriented to make things

simpler and smarter all the time.

I got passed over for a promotion.

Some organizations look at a person and say "What can this person do?" and they have that person work on different things, whatever he or she is good at, regardless of what the job description says. Other organizations are ruled by their policies and job descriptions. I was in the second kind of company, and

I'm looking for the first kind.

The big strategic issue in the company over the past year has been, "Do we want to continue to sell to both resellers and consumers, or pick one?" and the ultimate decision was to support the resellers exclusively. That is probably the right decision, but it made client-service coordinators like me unnecessary, and so our group was downsized. The silver lining is that I learned a ton about both B2C and B2B client service in that job, and I'm looking to use that knowledge in

my next assignment.

I'm looking for something closer to home.

The job was an hour from my house, which actually would have been fine if the challenge and the intellectual stimulation gave me something to mull over and strategize about while I was on the train, but what I found is that the job itself was rote enough that the two hours per day were all but wasted, brain-activity-wise. All that thinking time made it clear that I need a job where I'm more engaged, that will use more of my gray matter and let me do more

important work for the company.

The company is about to go under.

What's fun about moving through different organizations is that you get to see how industries work and how companies survive and thrive in their competitive landscapes. In that organization, I felt that the attention to product quality and customer service weren't at the level that it would take to compete against our competitors, but the strategy was to stay at the entry-level end of the market, where sales volume has been eroding fast. It was an incredible learning experience for me, but the signs were clear that it was time for me to make a

change.

I had a bad performance review.

The organization's goals were to grow market share and launch new products, so it was a great fit from that standpoint. My manager was pretty consumed with a Salesforce.com implementation, and my job had little to do with that project, but was very important to our sales team and its VP. I worked closely with those folks and loved it, but I'm interested in Sales Operations rather than in having a sales territory, so I decided to find something less focused on IT and more

targeted at creating leverage for the sales force.

The politics in that place could choke a horse.

I found that over the last year most of my time was going to non-essential, internal procedural and who-needs-to-approve-this type issues. I am sympathetic to the leadership team navigating some difficult terrain in the marketplace, but I needed to find an organization that's focused on its opportunities and

clients, and a job that's about the future and what is possible.

My job was billed as one thing and turned out to be another.

I took the job for the opportunity to work with a group of contract trainers around the globe -- two of my favorite things, virtual teams and international work! As the company shifted to working with agencies rather than individual trainers, my work became more clerical, related to contract terms with those agencies, and was a waste of brainpower both for the company and for me -- my strong suit is building teams, setting up processes to make the clerical stuff

easy, and then keeping the remote teams happy, in the loop and looking forward.

How to Explain Your Reasons for Leaving a Job (With ...

Know how to respond when an interviewer wants to know why you’re leaving your current job. Focus your answer around personal and professional growth.

By Hanne Keiling

December 8, 2021

Senior Content Manager at Indeed passionate about making career advice enjoyable and accessible, so people feel confident about getting and succeeding in the right jobs.

Related video: "Why Did You Leave Your Last Job?" 3 Strategies for Best Answers

In this video, we explain three key reasons why employers choose to ask this question and shares interview strategies for how to best answer it in a professional manner.

One of the most common questions interviewers ask is, “Why do you want to leave your current job?” Hiring managers want to know why you’re leaving so they can learn more about what’s important to you in a job and how you handle undesirable situations.

There are several ways to answer this question, so take time before your interview to prepare a thoughtful answer that will give your interviewer confidence about the decision to hire you. Here are a few examples of how to answer, as well as some tips on choosing the best option for you.

Common reasons for leaving a job

  • Your values no longer align with the company mission

  • You’d like additional compensation

  • The company you worked for went out of business

  • You feel undervalued in your current role

  • You are looking for a new challenge

  • You want a job with better career growth opportunities

  • You had to leave due to family or personal reasons

  • You don’t like the hours at your current job

  • You decided to relocate to a new city

  • You want to change career paths

  • You decided to go back to school

  • Your personality didn’t align with the company culture

  • You found a better opportunity

  • You had to leave for health reasons that have since been resolved

  • You were laid off or let go

  • You wanted to work in a different industry

How to answer "Why do you want to leave your current job?"

1. Be clear about your reasons for exiting

Take time to write down all the reasons you’re looking for a new opportunity. If you’re not sure about what they are, consider the following questions to get started:

  • What are your values?

  • What are your career goals? Where do you want to be in five years? 10 years?

  • What are your needs in a workplace environment? What do you need in a job?

  • What do you like about your position? What do you dislike?

  • What are your relationships like with coworkers? Managers?

  • What industry do you want to be in?

  • Are you passionate about your company’s mission?

  • Does your current situation align with these answers? Why or why not?

After you’ve written your answers down, circle a couple of key reasons you want to give in your interview. You should select reasons that stand out as professional rather than personal. For example, you may be looking for a new job because of a recent life change such as a marriage or move—these are not the reasons you should lead within the interview.

2. Keep your answer short

Though it’s important to fully answer your interviewer’s question in explaining why you want to leave your job, keep your response to around one or two sentences. Then, point the conversation back to why you’re the best person for the job.

3. Stay positive

Even if negative experiences have informed your decision to leave a job, it’s extremely important to find a positive way to explain your desire to move on. Employers want to hire problem solvers who can work through difficult situations. Focus on the skills you learned in your current role, good relationships you may have built with your coworkers or positive interactions you had with customers or stakeholders.

For example, instead of,
“I don’t like my manager. I’ve tried talking to him, but it looks like I have to find a new job,” try something like, “In my current role, I’ve learned many new skills. I’m looking for a position in which I can continue to grow that skill set in new circumstances.”

4. Be honest without being too detailed

When answering this question, you don’t need to go into all the details. If you find your current job unsatisfying, there is always a way to share that without disparaging your current employer (tips on this below). Keep your answer focused and short, and move the conversation back towards why you are excited about the opportunities ahead of you.

It’s important to keep in mind that the company you’re interviewing with may contact your previous employer, so what you’ve told them should be in line with what they’ll learn in those conversations. If you’re unemployed, be honest about that situation as well. If they get in contact with your previous employer to confirm start dates, salary range or get a reference, this could hurt your chances of getting the offer if you’ve provided different information.

Read More: How to Explain Employment Gaps in an Interview

How to frame your reasons for leaving a job

After you’ve thoughtfully listed out your reasons for leaving a job, the next step is to consider how an interviewer might interpret your answer. Here are a few examples of reasons that might not present well in an interview, and a few alternatives if any of the following are on your list:

"I don’t like the company."

There are positives and negatives in every company, including the one you’re interviewing for. Take a moment to think about why you don’t like the company you work for, and use this to craft a more positive, clear response.

For example:

“At my current organization, I’ve expanded my professional skillset and built great relationships. Recently, it became clear to me that I need motivation from a strong mission while continuing to grow professionally. The mission of your company to serve underrepresented communities is something I’m excited to work on.”

“I’ve been working on my communication and collaboration skills when it comes to facilitating large, complex projects. The opportunities to grow that expertise are limited in my current role, so I was excited to learn about this opportunity, where collaboration and transparency are mentioned as important components of the job.”

"I’d like more pay."

Think carefully about whether this is the reason you want to share—it can be interpreted by interviewers in a number of ways that can be hard to predict. If you decide it needs to be addressed, try framing it in a way that focuses on the larger topic of incentives and your motivation to take on challenging work that comes with big rewards:

“I’m motivated by a lot of factors, and client satisfaction, as well as peer and manager approval, are at the top of the list. But compensation is also a motivator for me and I’m excited about the opportunity to sell a product I’m passionate about, exceed my targets and celebrate when I’ve surpassed my goals.”

"I’m bored at work/I don’t like the job."

This reason for wanting to leave likely comes from dissatisfaction with the work you’re doing in your current role. Often, this means that you’re doing work that doesn’t fit with your skills and abilities or isn’t challenging. Try explaining this with a response based on skills and opportunities you’re seeking:

“I’ve learned a lot in my current role, but I’m looking for an opportunity that provides more challenges as I continue developing my skills and abilities.”

or

“While I’ve gained important skills in my experience with this role, like communication and time management, I want to focus more on honing my leadership and writing skills. I’m excited that this role provides more opportunities to grow those skills.”

"I don’t like the hours at my job."

If the hours and flexibility of your next job will play a significant role in your decision to accept an offer, this may be a good detail to share with your interviewer. However, the way you frame this response is crucial. You don’t want to come across as someone who isn’t willing to work hard. Instead, give an answer that positions you as a responsible and mature professional who knows how to manage your time well:

“I know that I do my best work when I have a healthy balance between work and life. The commitments I make to my managers and colleagues mean a lot to me, and I plan my days around following through on those commitments efficiently. It’s important to me to work for a company that values my ownership of my schedule and allows for flexibility when appropriate.”

Related: How to Quit a Job the Right Way

Good reasons for leaving a job

There are many reasons you can and should explain why you’re looking for a new opportunity. As professionals grow in the workplace, there is a natural flow from one job to the next as people seek out new learning opportunities, career development, new environments and other factors. Let’s look at a few examples of good reasons you’re looking for a new job:

1. Looking for career growth

Depending on how companies are structured, some may provide more opportunities to grow than others. It might also be challenging to change teams or departments if you’re looking to grow in a different direction. The desire to move to a new level in your career is a common reason for leaving a job. Here’s an example of how someone in this situation might explain why they’re leaving:

“I love my role and coworkers, but I’ve come to a point where there are no longer growth opportunities on my team. Can you tell me a bit about growth opportunities for this job, and what the company does to develop employee careers?”

2. Desire to change career paths

It is increasingly common for people to explore several different jobs and careers in their lifetime. Whether you want to go back to school, change industries or pivot what you’re working on, changing careers is a great example of why you may want a new job:

“I’m looking for a new opportunity that doesn’t exist at my current company where I can develop and expand my account management skills.”

3. Identified a better opportunity

Perhaps you’re looking to leave your job because you simply have a better choice. Whether that means your work environment will improve, you’ll get better pay or the company’s mission is a better match your values, it’s reasonable to seek out a new work situation when a better opportunity comes up:

“Though I’ve learned a lot at my company, from my research about this opportunity, I can see that the position is a better fit for where I want to take my career—specifically, collaborating with cross-functional teams to develop innovative products for your users.”

4. Let go or laid off

This is a reality for many people and can understandably be cause for anxiety when it comes time to explain why you’re looking for a job. Take some time to prepare your answer and follow these guidelines:

  • Be truthful without going into unnecessary detail

  • Avoid using the word “fired” if you can

  • Explain what you learned from the situation

  • Direct the interviewer toward why you’re a good fit for the position

Here are two examples:

If you were let go:
“In retrospect, I understand my former employer and I had different expectations about what success meant in my role. As I reflect on that experience, I realize there are some things I could have done differently. I learned a lot, and I’m excited about the opportunity to bring that maturity to my next job. This role is in line with my skills and abilities, and the direction I’d like my career to take.”

If you were laid off:
“Unfortunately I was impacted by a company restructuring that resulted in a loss of 15% of our employees. In the meantime, I’ve been thoughtfully considering my next move, reconnecting with my network and researching opportunities. I’m excited about this position because it exemplifies the parts of my past work I enjoyed the most and will position me in the direction I’ve always wanted to pursue in my career.”

These are just a few of many valid reasons you should explore new opportunities. If you’re unsure about what your answer may communicate to interviewers, try to get feedback on your reasons from trusted friends or mentors.

Related: How to Know When It Is Time to Leave a Job

Preparing for follow-up questions

Depending on the way you’ve answered the question, your interviewers may have follow-up questions, such as:

  • “Did you try to pursue this position at your current company?”

  • “How did you try and resolve those issues before deciding to look for a new role?”

  • “How do you plan to prevent miscommunication about expectations in your next role?”

Consider these as you complete your answer, and develop a few ideas for what your answer may look like for follow-up questions. Remember: Leaving a job for a new opportunity is very common. Your interviewer has likely left a job in their past, so they will be able to understand your position. Be clear on your reasons, plan your response and continue directing the conversation toward why you’re the best person for the job.

10 Best Answers for Reason for Job Change In Interview ...

30-06-2020 · Best Answers for Reason for Job Change In Interview. Some sample answers supported to the above reasons: Sample 1: I am willing to learn more about (mention a skill or task the new job includes. I’m sure this job will allow me to develop new skills and leverage my current skills and expertise. Sample 2: I am looking out for an opportunity that allows me to work on interesting and challenging ...

30-06-2020

One of the famous sayings by C. JoyBell C. was, “The only way that we can live is if we grow. The only way that we can grow is if we change. The only way that we can change is if we learn. The only way we can learn is if we are exposed. And the only way that we can become exposed is if we throw ourselves out into the open. Could you do it? Throw yourself”.

But throwing oneself out is not that easy. Throwing out to expose for the sake of growth and learning comes up with the hurdle called “Change.” Change is the most usual as well as a crucial part of life. But accepting the ‘usual-crucial’ concept of life is much more difficult.

In the process of gradually aging up, 80% of the population has a generalized dream of doing some of the highest paying jobs based on their aptitude and education.

The emergence of the professional and vocational courses also due to the trend of “campus recruitment.” Getting jobs as a fresher has become a bit easier than before. Change is quite obvious due to many factors.

Top Reasons for Job Change

Below are some of the common factors which urge for the job change:

Higher Salary: Being money is the biggest motivator; a higher salary is always the vital reason for a job change; when they do not get a satisfactory amount of pay from their current organization matching their skills and work, their desire for job change comes at peak.

Due to the pay factor, the urge to switch the organization due to the pay factor has become more rigorous nowadays due to the current lifestyle based on hefty EMIs and expensive desires.

Disputes with teammates: People coming from different grounds, staying and working together for almost 10 hours has a high probability of crashing due to difference in opinion and different mindset which makes work environment stressful and justify the phrase that “People don’t leave the company, people leave people.”

Clashes with management: Management in the company works in 3- tier viz; top, middle, and bottom. Every individual, as per their job role and company hierarchy, fits in one particular tier and is answerable to the next level of the hierarchy, but as the hierarchy rises, supervision and protocols also rise, which many times become unfit for the employees and leads them towards the decision of job change.

Higher learning curve: As all say, there is no stop for learning. One can learn anything new until the last breath of his/her life, but many times in work culture, an individual sticks towards a set of routine work and cant explore and learn anything new. This monotonous and easy job type may hamper the learning curve and induces one to look for a job change.

Brand name: It is always a matter of pride when one associates and works with a big brand name of their respective field as it is a general tendency that a big name means big fame, more money, and lucrative perks. Hence these factors always induce one to change jobs and associate with such big brand names.

Location constraint: Weather while working in a home town or re-establishing in another city for a job, location can be a constraint in both the conditions. While working in a home- town, if traveling consumes more time, then the job starts becoming lethargic at the moment, and while working in a remote city, homesickness becomes a crucial factor; such constraints always create a reason for a job change.

Work timing: Work-life balance is a very vital concept in today’s life because people have more commitments toward their work rather than with their family and friends, but job and money is of no use if one doesn’t have a happy personal and family life, but when due to this hectic work pressure one can’t manage the work-life balance due to their current organization, then job change becomes the utmost priority.

Unhealthy work ambiance: Whether home or work, a healthy ambiance is always the key to foster. Sometimes, it is realized that organization practices unfriendly SOPs, congestive HR Policies, and excessive work politics. Instead of fostering productivity, it inculcates frustration, which always instigates one to look for a job change.

Overall growth and development: Apart from the above factors, it is always encouraged that after a certain point for over betterment, growth, and development and to understand the new set of world, taking up new challenges, and to greet and meet new people for a complete enhancement package. It is better to step- up and explore new opportunities.

The above common factors may induce for a job change, but to grab a new job, one undergoes a phase called to interview. This nine lettered word is derived from the French word ‘entre void’ which explicitly means to view and interact with one another. But this viewing and interaction is the toughest one as it decides the base of the career and upcoming future.

With the advancement in technology, the sort of interviews has also changed. Initially, there have been only face-to-face interviews, but now it starts from the telephonic round and ends at the technical round. Since during the telephonic conversation, the recruiter can’t see one another. In the final round, the technically sound candidate can easily crack the final round. Still, the foremost important round is the HR round. After this round, HR decides the candidature to be taken for the final level or not if it suits the standards supported the need for a job. Generally, HR interviews are mocked by many and thought of to be useless. Still, such false perceptions can never be helped out because, through this round, the process of selection encompasses behavior, patience, intelligent quotient, and intellectual quotient. In the HR round, candidates have to undergo with the set of below-listed questions like:

1. Tell me about yourself.

2. Why are you interested in this position?

3. Why are you leaving your current job?

4. Tell me about your strengths and weaknesses.

5. Where do you see yourself in the next five years?

6. What do you know about our company?

7. Why should we hire you?

8. What questions do you have for me?

All the above questions have their own importance for the aim of assessment and evaluation. Still, the answer to Question #3 reflects your approach for the work and methodology and how the candidate has managed his/her previous work challenges and support to the same the individuals’ nature, temperament, and thought process is analyzed and judged.

Hence it is vital to answer this tricky question in the most sophisticated and absolute best manner by observing the below points:

  1. Never bad-mouth about your current or previous organization and bosses.
  2. Do not directly disclose your only reason to change is money.
  3. Never confess about your clashes with management or colleagues.
  4. Do not directly complain about the company’s pathetic work culture and strict policies.
  5. Don’t be vague.

However, it is always appreciated if you do not lie in your interview because a well-driven interview is the only source to match the right candidate for the right job, but being frank and extroverted may lead to figuring the image of a hypocrite, greedy, arrogant, and lethargic. So below given are several superb reasons for job change during an interview:

  • Looking for better career prospects, professional growth, and work opportunities.
  • Looking for new challenges at work.
  • The company made redundant, or the company closed down.
  • The company underwent a merger or an acquisition.
  • Job duties are reduced or job outsourced.
  • Employed for one project or on a short-term contract.

Best Answers for Reason for Job Change In Interview

Best Answers for Reason for Job Change In Interview

Some sample answers supported to the above reasons:

Sample 1: I am willing to learn more about (mention a skill or task the new job includes. I’m sure this job will allow me to develop new skills and leverage my current skills and expertise.

Sample 2: I am looking out for an opportunity that allows me to work on interesting and challenging projects. Since this company is known for launching new products and services every year, I would like to be a part of the company and learn more.

Sample 3: My skills and qualifications seem to be a perfect match with your company’s job requirements. Therefore, at this present time, for me, I wish to upgrade my skills and gain more exposure in a new industry your company is involved in

Sample 4: I was lucky enough to land on a job at a startup right out of my college, which means that I wore many hats right from my first day in the office. Now I’m looking forward to taking my skills into a senior role.

Sample 5: I had been with this company for several years and learned a lot, but felt ready for a change.

Sample 6: I took a position with a company that was closer to my home.

Sample 7: I had been with the organization for several years and wanted to experience a new environment to continue growing.

Sample 8: I’ve enjoyed working with a great group of people at my current employer, but this opportunity in this company fits very well with the direction I want to take my career.

Sample 9: I’ve learned a great deal in my current job, but I’m interested in working at [name of employer] based on the great things I have learned about this organization.

Sample 10: This job has been a great experience, but growth is limited because it is relatively small. So, to continue to grow, I need to look elsewhere, and working in this opportunity looks very interesting to me because…

If you’ve got interviews arising and don’t want to go away any chance, remember to keep it positive, promote yourself and your accomplishments, and preach the old saying, “if you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.”

Are you looking for a job change? Register here on our platform to find jobs matching your skills.

5 Reasons Why It’s Time to Make a Career Change

Thinking about switching careers? Or simply wondering why people change careers? These are the main reasons – perhaps they're your reasons too.

Are you thinking about making a career change? You’re not alone. It’s estimated that the average person will change careers between five and seven times over the course of their working life. Research from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that the average worker holds upwards of 10 different jobs before the age of 50, and this number is set to rise even further in upcoming decades.

The changing nature of work means that a career change may be more feasible for you than for previous generations. People are increasingly working in new ways, be it flexibly, remotely or part-time.

While in the past skills and professions were learned for life, education and training is now becoming an ongoing part of a more dynamic working style. This is made possible with the help of new learning opportunities, such as online courses.

While working might once have been viewed as little more than a means to pay the bills, it’s now widely accepted that finding a fulfilling career is one of the keys to a happy life. With this in mind, perhaps it’s time for you to take a step back and look at some of the main reasons people take the leap and decide to make a career change.

5reasonscareerchange 02 min x 1000 515x

1. You need a new challenge

Even if you’re content with your job, company and work colleagues, it’s possible that after several years have passed, it has all become too routine. If you’re the kind of person that needs to push themselves and try new things, a career change might be just the ticket. Venturing a little out of our depth can sometimes be exactly what we need to feel satisfied and accomplished in our working life. If you’re feeling just a little too comfortable, starting a new career path that encourages you to gain new knowledge and skills may help to spice things up.

5reasonscareerchange 04 min x 1000 515x

2. Your values have changed

A job is like a relationship; sometimes you just grow in different directions. While you might once have been passionate about your company’s mission, this may no longer be the case. The idea that people can change drastically over the course of a lifetime isn’t a radical one, and something you’re happy doing at 22 might no longer float your boat at 40. You may have had a spiritual awakening and be craving to get out of the office and into a more relaxed working environment. Or, while financial security might not have been a priority for you when you were young, you now seek more stability than your current job as a freelancer affords. These changing values, concerns and priorities might mean a career change is in order.

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3. You want to focus on other things

Sometimes our job does not allow enough us to spend enough time on other aspects of our lives. Perhaps you wish you had more time to dedicate to your family, or to a hobby you’re passionate about. Maybe you desire more time out to travel and see the world. If this is the case, consider a career that allows you to work flexibly or for yourself. Research also shows that more and more Europeans are now opting for part-time work as their primary job, so depending on your situation, working fewer hours may be an option. There’s more to life than work and sometimes we need a career that allows us to acknowledge that.

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4. Your passion lies elsewhere

Cast your mind back to your adolescent years. Did you quietly dream of finding success as a stand-up comedian, but your school careers counsellor advised a business degree? There’s nothing wrong with chasing a long-term dream or following what you’re passionate about. We’re often under pressure to make career decisions deemed practical or realistic, but ultimately you are the only one who can determine what job is right for you. Thanks to technology it’s easier than before to research your new career or gain visibility for yourself online. For example, a career in the competitive field of journalism may have seemed unreachable before, but now you have the opportunity to start a successful blog from the comfort of your own bed! If you prepare well and utilise all the modern resources available to you, it’s completely possible to make a career out of doing what you love.

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5. You’re not happy

A recent study of British workers showed that job satisfaction was the second most important predictor of overall life satisfaction. This is no big surprise. If you’re unhappy, your job is one of the first places you should look. Your work life inevitably seeps into your personal life, and if you’re feeling dissatisfied, perhaps a career change will give you something new to focus your energies on. There are a number of things at your job that could be leaving you unhappy such as the pressure, the long hours, your colleagues or the tedious work. If you’re not happy in your work environment and it is affecting you on a personal level, it might be time for a change.

Do any of these apply to you? Whether you’re feeling unfulfilled in your current job or just looking to try something new, a career change offers many potential benefits. And, luckily, in this day and age, the possibilities are endless. You can start researching your new career online right now, or check out a bootcamp like CareerFoundry to get started.

10 Great Reasons to Change Jobs

20-07-2011 · But some situations make it almost mandatory for a career-minded person to change jobs. You may find your career at a dead end in your current workplace, or you might only be able to realize your full potential in another position. In extreme cases, you may need to leave a job for the sake of your emotional well-being or safety.

20-07-2011

Leaving a job can be one of the most stressful occasions in your working life. You may have spent years as part of an organization, becoming an integrated part of its office culture. Your routines, habits and small daily rituals -- such as when and where you take coffee breaks -- don't carry with you to a new job, and leaving that type of familiar environment behind can be frightening for even the most seasoned worker.

And then there are the personal connections. If you work in an office, you've undoubtedly become friends -- or at least comfortable acquaintances -- with your co-workers. Leaving your job means saying goodbye to these people, and to the teamwork and sense of collaboration you've developed during your time together.

But some situations make it almost mandatory for a career-minded person to change jobs. You may find your career at a dead end in your current workplace, or you might only be able to realize your full potential in another position. In extreme cases, you may need to leave a job for the sake of your emotional well-being or safety. As traumatic as it is to leave a job, staying can sometimes be even worse.

How do you know when it's time to hand in your two weeks' notice? Some situations are clearer than others, and some are definite signs that it's time to turn a new page in your career. Read on to learn about 10 of the best reasons to change jobs.

Think about the learning curve you experienced when you started your current job. There was likely a period of fast-paced adaptation, followed by a longer period of learning the finer details of your work. Ideally, you ended this phase by moving into a level of mastery of your daily tasks and became an expert in your part of the organization's operation.

But are you capable of more? And could you advance your personal base of career-specific knowledge by repeating this process in a new position? The answer could be "yes."

Some researchers suggest that the typical worker masters his or her specific job over the course of three years. After that point, the pace of industry-focused learning and skill mastery slows. It stands to reason, they argue, that changing jobs after that three-year span ends resets and recharges the process, giving you the opportunity to grow and learn at a rapid pace for another three years in the new job [source: National Executive Resources Inc.].

While the three-year term isn't a hard-and-fast rule, it does provide a loose guide and a reference point to evaluate what you're learning at work. Would changing to a new position within your industry force you to learn new skills? Could those skills complement those you already have, making you a more well-rounded and capable professional? If so, this could be a good reason to start looking for a new job.

Not all companies are created equal. Likewise, the same job in different industries can pay significantly different amounts. Being aware of these disparities -- and finding opportunities because of them -- can provide very valid reasons to change jobs.

Some industries feature a mix of large- and small-scale companies vying for similar work. For example, you may find that a smaller contractor than the one you work for doesn't have the consistent work of its larger counterpart, but makes up for it with an exclusivity that allows it to charge higher rates. Conversely, you may find that a larger employer can provide more steady pay to its sales force than a smaller competitor, thanks to its broader market reach. In situations like these, employees in identical positions at different companies may have vastly different pay scales and growth opportunities.

In a similar fashion, your job skills may be much more valuable in one industry than another. A marketing director for a small nonprofit, for example, may make significantly less than a marketing director at an industrial manufacturer. Being aware of what your counterparts in other industries make can alert you to these disparities -- the difference in pay or opportunity may be enough to justify a job change.

You've undoubtedly heard friends and family members talk about wanting a "cushy" job -- one where the work is easy, slow-paced and not challenging at all. The ideal cushy job, it seems, would almost be a paid nap, with just enough work to keep you looking busy (but not enough to make you truly busy).

The reality of the work environment is quite different. A job can indeed be too easy, with disastrous consequences for your happiness and career growth.

Some sources suggest that the perfect job involves truly challenging, outside-your-comfort-zone work about 20 percent of the time. This is enough of a challenge to keep you on your toes, without leaving you overwhelmed and facing burnout from the stress [source: Shigley].

A job with little or no challenging work puts you at risk for a number of job- and career-killing factors. You may slip into bad work habits, such as playing games online or surfing the Internet, to pass time. Your morale could plummet, leaving you unenthusiastic and not ready to jump on opportunities when they arise. And your supervisor may notice your boredom and take it as a sign that you're not a valuable employee [source: Shigley].

If you find that you're getting chronically bored at work or don't have any challenges coming across your desk, it may be time to look for a new job. You owe it to your long-term career goals to stay challenged: Find a job that does that.

Every employee gets aggravated with his or her boss now and then. But if "now and then" becomes "all the time" in your office, the friction might be justification to move to a new position.

Perhaps you feel that your boss doesn't do his or her job as well as you could. Maybe you don't like the direction he or she insists on leading your team. Or maybe you simply have a fundamental communication issue with your boss that makes every exchange tense and filled with second-guessing and distrust. All of these situations can lead to bitterness and resentment as you complete assigned tasks -- in that situation, do you think your work will be the best it can be, or will it show your disappointment and frustration with your work environment?

If you're facing this situation, think about what truly aggravates you about your boss. If it's a personality quirk or interpersonal issue, is there a way you can watch for this in a future job interview, so that you don't move from one bad situation to another? If it's a matter of leadership or decision-making, can you identify solutions you could present to a new employer, showing that you've got what it takes to be a better leader? Answer these questions before you choose a new job, so that you don't jump hastily from one bad situation into another.

The old cliché about rats leaving a sinking ship isn't flattering, but it does have a ring of truth in the working world: If you can see that your company's on its way to financial ruin -- or worse -- it's probably a good time to find a new job.

There are many reasons why companies fail. Some may simply be in declining markets and are outpaced by their competitors as the customer base shrinks. Others fail because leaders make poor decisions or simply don't understand how the market shifts around them. In extreme cases, a leader's fraud or illegal actions could put a business at risk, with lower-level employees paying a price as the business fails.

Thankfully, all of these situations are easier to spot from inside the company than outside. If you see something happening in your workplace -- a large number of layoffs, perhaps, or consistently poor quarterly sales figures -- ask questions among trusted sources in the company. Together, you and your allies may be able to identify a major problem before the company's leadership admits to it. In a best-case scenario, you may be able to offer a solution that keeps the company afloat and boosts your status among your superiors. At the other end of the spectrum, however, this kind of insight could alert you to major problems that may occur in the near future. This gives you time to act, so you're ahead of the game if your company suddenly goes under.

Suppose you get married to someone who works in another state, or your spouse gets a tremendously good job offer that requires you to move. Perhaps you're about to have a child, or an aging parent is moving in with you. You want to spend more time with your family, and your current job situation may not allow for that kind of shift in your priorities.

Smart employees alert their bosses to these life changes early on, keeping them in the loop as their needs, priorities and availability shifts. Beyond being a courtesy to your employer, this practice can greatly improve your odds of adapting your work situation to your new life situation. Perhaps your employer will have enough time to adapt your job requirements or help you find a new job within the company that better meets your life needs. If that isn't possible, your employer may become a powerful reference as you search for a new job. In some cases, your employer might even be willing to help you find a new job, cultivating a long-term relationship in case you're able to return in the future.

If, however, you encounter resistance to the change from your employer, what does that say about your current job? It may be easier to endure the stress of a job change if you learn that your employer doesn't respect your need for a healthy work-life balance or expects you to put your job before personal and family commitments.

Every company, office and job team develops its own work culture. Imagine, for example, an office full of baseball fanatics, where fantasy baseball is the center of conversation in the spring and the World Series is the main topic of conversation in the fall. This kind of connection can help co-workers bond and become a better team, but it can also make the office an exclusive -- and even uninviting -- place for outsiders.

If you're in a work environment where the culture isn't conducive to your productivity, happiness or comfort, consider what's at the root of the discomfort. If it's something generally nonthreatening, such as the group's love of baseball, for example, perhaps you can find other co-workers who share your outsider status. Or perhaps there are other topics that the office could come together over. It could take time, but with enough patience, you may see the office environment shift to focus on more inclusive topics, themes and values.

Sometimes, however, a work environment is rigidly exclusive or is based on unhealthy themes, such as sexual discrimination or the use of drugs and alcohol. If this is the case, you should familiarize yourself with Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and anti-harassment laws in your state and country. You may be in a position to stop a culture of illegal discrimination through an EEO complaint.

If the problem is one of simply not being part of the office's culture, however, you may decide it's best to find a new job.

Perhaps you started your current job under the impression that it would let you use your unique strengths to do fulfilling work. When you began work and started learning the ins and outs of your job, you realized that instead of playing to your strengths, the position requires skills, strengths or a disposition that aren't in line with who you are.

If you're in a position that plays more to your weaknesses than your strengths, is there a way to shift that balance? Perhaps you can learn new skills that make you better suited for -- and more satisfied in -- the job. Maybe there's another position within the company that suits your interests, and you can orchestrate a transition. If the difference between what you need to do and what you want to do is severe, however, you may benefit from talking with your supervisor.

Be honest with your boss: Explain that the job doesn't capitalize on your strengths, and you feel it's best to find an opportunity that better uses what you do well. If you've presented your case well, your boss may be willing to work with you and adapt your position, or help you move into a position within the company that better suits your strengths. This isn't always possible, but giving your boss the chance to help you before you leave will ensure that you're respected as a professional if you ever need to come back to your boss for a reference.

Professionals who are good at their jobs get noticed. Companies want to employ the best in their field, after all, and where better to find the best in the business than within a competitor's upper ranks? If you do good work and are skilled at networking within your industry, there's a good chance you'll be noticed by competitors.

A better offer may come as a surprise. If you're good at your current job, odds are you're happy there. But another company that wants you bad enough may be willing to offer whatever it takes -- more money, more flexibility or better benefits -- to convince you to join its team.

If you're approached with a better offer, don't be afraid to ask tough questions about the company's business and its work environment. You're the one holding the power, after all: You can simply reject the offer and stay in your current position if you so choose.

A good outside offer may put you in position to ask for more from your current employer, as well. It's common practice -- and considered courteous in most industries -- to give your present employer a chance to counter-offer and keep you on staff. Negotiate right, and you could end up gaining a raise, promotion or other benefits without having to change jobs. If your current employer won't negotiate, however, you should take that as a sign that you may be better off in a new job.

Much like a major life change, a change in your career objectives or desires may make it necessary for you to change to a new job. Maybe you completed a college degree that opens new doors for you, or you might be at a point in life where you simply want to pursue a different occupation. This kind of transition often comes after a long period of thought, discussion at home and training outside of work. You may have been planning this for years.

If you're currently in a healthy job situation, this kind of transition could be an easy one to make. It's likely that you've built close relationships with your co-workers, and they know that your career ambitions go beyond what you can reach in your current job. Your supervisor may have worked with you to set a schedule that let you go back to school, and your co-workers may be very supportive of your hard work to move your work life in a new direction.

The key to making this kind of transition a success is communication. If you're pursuing a new degree, don't keep it a secret. Get co-workers and your employer used to the idea that you may be moving your career in a new direction, and you could be surprised by how supportive they are when you finally make that leap into the next chapter of your working life.

For more career-related articles, check out the links on the next page.

  • Federal Communications Commission. "Understanding Workplace Harassment." (July 25, 2011) http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/understanding-workplace-harassment-fcc-staff
  • National Executive Resources Inc. "The Strategic Case for Changing Jobs: Four Good Reasons to Change Jobs Within the Same Industry Three Times During Your First Ten Years of Employment." June 2006. (July 13, 2011) http://www.nerisearch.com/neri-newsletter-career-development-june-6-changing-jobs.html
  • Shigley, Debra. "8 Good Reasons To Quit Your Job." Psychology Today. Jan. 22, 2010. (July 13, 2011) http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/second-act/201001/8-good-reasons-quit-your-job
  • Sundheim, Ken. "When It's Time To Resign And Move On." Employment Digest. April 18, 2011. (July 13, 2011) http://employmentdigest.net/2011/04/when-its-time-to-resign-and-move-on/
How to Answer “Why Are You Looking for a New Job?” (6 ...

13 Good Reasons for Why You’re Looking for a New Job You were laid off by your previous employer. Your company is going through layoffs, and although your job hasn’t been eliminated yet, you feel that this is a good... You’re looking to grow or take the next step in your career and your current ...

why are you looking for a new job - best answer examples

If you’re looking for a new position or trying to change jobs, employers are going to ask why!

And if you don’t have a convincing answer, it could cost you the opportunity.

So in this article, I’ll walk you through the following:

  • Why interviewers ask, “Why are you looking for a new job?”
  • How to answer to impress a hiring manager (including 13 good reasons you can provide)
  • The biggest mistake to avoid when answering
  • 6 full answer examples

Why Do Companies Ask Why You’re Looking For a New Job?

Employers ask this job interview question to make sure you didn’t cause problems at your last company, and to understand your goals so they can hire someone who will be a good long-term fit for the role!

They’d ideally like to find someone who is looking for career advancement and/or is genuinely interested in their company and position.

Note that employers might phrase this question in slightly different ways, too, including:

  • “Why are you interested in new job opportunities?”
  • “Why are you looking for a job change?”

You can answer all of these questions in the same way, and coming up, you’re going to learn how.

While there isn’t one single “correct” answer to why you’re job searching right now, you do need to be ready to give a clear explanation. This isn’t a question where you want to hesitate or draw a blank.

Next, let’s look at how to answer, and I’ll also give you a list of acceptable reasons that you can provide when answering this question!

How to Answer, “Why Are You Looking for a New Job?”

When explaining why you’re looking for a new position, be direct and upfront.

You should state your response in a very clear, matter-of-fact way, and don’t try to dodge the question!

However, don’t stress out and act like this question is a big deal. The goal is to answer quickly and then move on with the conversation!

Don’t panic and don’t be apologetic. It’s normal to search for jobs, whether you were recently laid off or are simply looking for a better opportunity while still employed. There’s nothing to apologize for. The interviewer simply wants to know your story.

Next, I’ll share a list of good reasons you can use to explain why you’re job searching! These aren’t the only acceptable answers, but hopefully, this gives you some idea of the wide range of answers you can use.

13 Good Reasons for Why You’re Looking for a New Job

  1. You were laid off by your previous employer.
  2. Your company is going through layoffs, and although your job hasn’t been eliminated yet, you feel that this is a good time to look for a more secure job opportunity.
  3. You’re looking to grow or take the next step in your career and your current employer can’t offer the type of opportunity you seek.
  4. You’d like to move into management and your employer doesn’t have this opportunity available.
  5. You’d like to change industries.
  6. You’d like to gain exposure to a different stage or size of company to become more well-rounded (for example, looking to join a start-up after spending your entire career in large corporations).
  7. Your current role has changed since you joined the company and no longer fits your career goals.
  8. Your manager or the person who hired you left and you feel it’s a good time to make a transition for yourself, too.
  9. The company has been acquired and you feel this is a good time to move on rather than staying for big changes and restructuring.
  10. You anticipate that the company may struggle financially in the near future and you want to leave before this.
  11. You’re relocating for personal reasons (for example, to be closer to aging parents) and need to find a job in a new city.
  12. You were fired (sometimes, if you were fired, it’s best to be honest and upfront about it. So while it’s not easy to explain being fired, it’s still a valid reason for why you’re job searching).
  13. You’re not job searching, but a recruiter contacted you and convinced you to take an interview to learn about an opportunity.

Why You Shouldn’t Always Be Honest

You should usually be honest about why you’re searching for new opportunities, but there are times where it may be better to omit a fact or two.

If you’re currently employed, it’s best to sound like you’re making a change for career-related reasons (such as wanting to take a step up in your career) or for unavoidable personal circumstances (like your spouse or partner finding a new job in a different state and you needing to do the same).

An example of an answer that I wouldn’t want to hear as an employer is, “This job is 10 minutes from my home and I’d love to have a shorter commute. I’m sick of commuting.”

This answer might be the truth. It’s something I would have done in my past years! I hated commuting. So I get it!

But this response isn’t going to help you get the job offer in most cases. It’s better to sound like you’re leaving your job in order to grow professionally.

You can still mention your commute length as one reason, especially if it’s extremely long right now, but it’s best to mention one or two career-related factors as well (you’ll see this in the example answers coming up!)

The Top Mistake to Avoid With This Interview Question

The biggest mistake to avoid when answering this question is badmouthing a former boss, coworker, or employer. Never do this!

It doesn’t matter if you were laid off, fired, or currently work for the company! It’s always best to sound positive when you explain why you’re looking for a change or a new opportunity.

If you complain about another employer in your interview, the hiring manager is just going to wonder if you were part of the problem, since they haven’t heard the other side of the story!

I experienced this many times as a recruiter. I’d listen to a candidate complain and badmouth, and it wasn’t attractive at all! If anything, it just made me wonder what the employer would say about them!

If you’re employed right now, don’t badmouth your current job or company, either.

One trick you can use to avoid badmouthing is to focus on talking about what you hope to gain in your current job search, instead of talking about what you’re looking to get away from.

For example, imagine your last position was very chaotic and stressful and the company laid you off because of financial struggles. You’d want to explain what happened, but then instead of talking about how awful it was to work there, talk about what you’re looking for in a new job, and why this next company seems attractive to you.

This is exactly how I recommend answering, “Why did you leave your last company?” too! The less you can badmouth, the better!

Now let’s look at some full sample answers so you can see how this sounds in real-world scenarios…

Why You’re Looking for a New Job: Best Answer Examples

Example Answer #1:

30% of my department was laid off and I was a part of that. I enjoyed the role and learned a lot, but the company had struggled financially for the entire time I was there. I’m hoping to find a company that’s in a better financial position so that I can continue learning and growing as a Staff Accountant and take on more responsibilities over time. One other thing that attracted me to your role was the industry that you’re in. I’ve always been passionate about the travel industry and am an avid traveler myself!

Example Answer #2:

My current role is going well, but I’ve been at the company for six years, and I think it’s time to experience another organization in order to expose myself to new challenges and keep growing professionally. I’ve known about your organization for many years since we’re in the same industry, and I’ve always liked your line of products. I also read some fantastic reviews from current employees online.

Notice how in both of these answer examples above, I’m concluding by explaining why their job and company interested me. This is a great idea because it shows them that you have specific reasons for wanting to work for them.

Hiring managers always prefer someone who’s excited about their job and company, rather than someone who seems like they just want any job they can find.

So even if the interviewer doesn’t directly ask, “Why are you applying for this position?” it’s often a good idea to explain your reasons and show that you’ve done your research!

Example Answer #3:

My family is relocating to the Chicago area for my wife’s job, so I’m looking to find the next step in my career here in Chicago, too.

Example Answer #4:

I’m looking to change jobs because my family had to relocate for personal reasons and my commute is now 90 minutes each way. I’m hoping to find a position that’s closer to my home while also providing a great next step in my career. I saw that your job description mentions the opportunity to manage client projects with budgets of millions of dollars. That’s something that excited me a lot. I’ve managed 12 projects for my current employer this past quarter, with a total budget of 0,000, so I thought this could be a great potential fit!

Example Answer #5:

I’ve enjoyed my current company but we’re going through big changes right now. Both of my bosses and the person who recruited me into the company have left the organization, and I feel that it’s a good time for me to look to make a transition as well if I’m able to find the right opportunity.

Example Answer #6:

I wasn’t actively job searching, but a recruiter contacted me and your role sounded like an interesting opportunity. The story they told me about your company’s history and recent growth caught my attention, so I was hoping to learn more.

One situation not covered in the sample answers above is being fired for performance issues or misconduct. If you were fired and need help explaining it, read this article.

Also, as you can see from the examples above, there isn’t one “right” formula for how long your answer needs to be. Your answer can be quite long, but can also be one to two sentences. Use your best judgement when deciding what to say (and not say).

Conclusion

There are many reasons to be looking for work and there isn’t one single correct answer when interviewers ask, “Why are you looking for a new job?”

Use the steps and example answers above to decide ahead of time what you’re going to say, and practice so that you don’t hesitate or fumble.

Your answer doesn’t need to be long-winded, and you don’t need to explain every single reason, but you do need to give some type of clear explanation. And if you’re unemployed, the hiring manager will want to know the reason for that, too.

Address the question head-on with a clear answer that remains positive and never badmouths and you’ll impress the interviewer and be one step closer to landing the job!

Reasons for Changing Jobs: Why do You Want to Change your Job?

Money can be the reason for a job change, if your salary is substantially less than the average and therefore driving you to look around for a new job that might pay better. But, for most cases, total money earned including incentives and bonuses is not the main reason.


Why are you looking for a job change?
This questions can be raised by the interviewer during your job interview, can be asked by people around you or you may ask yourself if you’re not satisfied from your current job.

It is not about money or at least, not just money give you rational for changing jobs and look elsewhere.

Money can be the reason for a job change, if your salary is substantially less than the average and therefore driving you to look around for a new job that might pay better. But, for most cases, total money earned including incentives and bonuses is not the main reason.
So if money is not the driving factor, what is the reason most people leave?

Why do people change jobs?

Researches show that the #1 solid reason people look for a new job is getting away from a ‘bad’ boss (or ‘bad’ management), especially direct managers who are seen as blocking career advancement and job achievements.

Those bosses who do not listen, delegate assignments and provide feedback increase their employees’ dissatisfaction that start thinking – “give me a chance to advance, learn, grow and notice me when I do that”. Therefore, the bad performance of your immediate supervisor can be the reason you’d want to change your current job.

Do you belong to the category of employees that are facing – lack of recognition, attention, feedback and lack of communicating up the organization?

If you do, you belong to the vast majority of job changers: people who do not stand being underemployed or undervalued are people who most often change jobs and for a good reason.

Additionally, if your workplace blocks or limits the opportunities for advancement you would be inclined/want to change your current job soon as you feel you achieved and leaned the maximum you can.

Other reasons for a job change are: • More suited geography or better location. • Getting away from a failing company.

• Better fit with your skills, strengths and career aspirations – a career change.

For further information on how to handle the job interview question on changing jobs refer to –

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Why do you want to be a receptionist? 7 sample answers

Why you want to work as a receptionist is one thing. But why exactly at their place? This question is your opportunity to praise the hotel managers for a good work. Instead of just saying why you want to be a receptionist, you can elaborate on your answer. For example you can say that you love the way their hotel is organized and managed. Or ...

People travel for work, for fun, and sometimes for the sake of traveling. Meeting new places, seeing new faces, and sometimes simply forgetting the reality of life back home. When they travel, they have to sleep somewhere. In a hotel, hostel, any other sort of accommodation. And there she is–a smiling receptionist, a welcoming face, someone to check them in, show them around, and help them with their requests.

Receptionist is a wonderful job. And though it is poorly paid in most countries, many people still apply. In fact hundreds of interviews for a job of a receptionist take place in big and small hotels all around the world, every single day. And many of them start with the following question: Why do you want to become a receptionist.

It’s not an easy one to answer, since it is not a job of doctor, social worker, firefighter, manager. It’s not an occupation children dream of having once they are old enough to have a job. And yet they ask you to explain your choice… Actually you can refer to a variety of things–your skills and abilities (fitting for the job), your career plan (some position you’d like to have in the future and receptionist is a good start, or a hotel you hope to run), nature of the job itself. Or you can bet on brutal honesty, explaining why you cannot get anything better at the moment.

Let’s have a look at 7 sample answers to the question. In my list you will find some examples for each of the scenarios I just described.

7 sample answers to “Why do you want to be a receptionist?” interview question

  1. I just feel it is the right match for my skills and personality. I’ve been always good in listening to people, in understanding their needs. Others generally enjoy talking to me, and I am quick with paperwork and good around computers. What’s more, I love the environment of modern hotels, and it would be great to work in such a place. Everything considered, at this stage of my professional career, I consider a job of a receptionist a perfect choice.
  2. I want to be a receptionist so I can become a hotel manager one day in the future. It may sound ambitious, I know. But in most hotel chains this is how it works–you start from the bottom, from the reception desk. Because that’s the place where things are happening, where you meet people, deal with requests, understand the daily life of the hotel. I believe that once I prove my skills I will get a chance to progress in my career here. And if I don’t, I can always marry a millionaire and open my own hotel in the future…
  3. I just love the nature of the job. To stand at this beautiful desk, meeting travelers all day, smiling, helping them to get the paperwork done quickly so they can finally relax after a long journey. Being around other charismatic receptionists, and just enjoying the conversations you have all day long–including the few unpleasant conversations, with guests who aren’t satisfied. To me this seems like a perfect idea of something I should do to earn money, and that’s why I am applying for the job with you.
  1. I’ve been working at a reception desk for ten years already. It has become almost my daily routine really, and a lifestyle I cannot complain about. The place where I worked before had to close down, however, so I am looking for a new place to continue in my career of a receptionist, delivering excellent service to the guests daily, helping the hotel to maintain excellent reputation.
  2. Speaking honestly, I simply need any job right now. I’ve been struggling with money, and with my education and lack of experience, I cannot really hope for a miracle. However, I like the job description, and can envision myself working behind the receptionist desk. And I also know that many places here struggle with hiring receptionists, because the pay is low and one has to do night shifts and stuff. But I am totally all-right with that. If you give me a chance here, I promise I will try my best to become a great receptionist.
  3. I’ve always wanted to work in healthcare, but I wasn’t lucky enough to have money to study at the university, to pursue a degree in medicine. But I realized that I can still be an important part of a medical practice–working as a medical receptionist, for example. Sure, I won’t do surgery or save lives. But a receptionist is important in each medical practice, and I will play my part in helping the patients. That’s the reason why I decided to apply for this job with you. I hope you will give me a chance.
  4. To be honest, I just wanted to live in the mountains. I love Swiss Alps, being in the mountains, hiking, running, climbing. But this is a holiday destination and one cannot really afford to live here–unless they run a hotel, or work in one. I believe that a job of a receptionist in this small town is an ideal choice for me. It will allow me to stay in the mountains all the time, and I do not have to pay thousands just for a rent. I can stay here, work here, and in my free time roam the mountains…

Any reason is better than no reason

Hiring managers and hotel managers are not naive. They know how much receptionists earn, and that it isn’t an easy job, especially when one does night shifts and stuff. But at the end of the day, everyone needs a job. And not everyone can manage the hotel…

What I try to convey here is that they do not expect you to be brimming with excitement in the interviews. They know that if you did not have to work, you would not. What they expect, however, is to hear at least some reason why you consider receptionist a good job choice.

It can be your preference of this type of a working environment, some future unrealistic dream you have (running your own hotel one day), a clinging to a habit (you’ve always worked at a reception desk so why would you change it now), or even a simple wish to live and work in the mountains (in some nice holiday destination, something you could hardly afford otherwise)…

Praise their place if you get a chance

Why you want to work as a receptionist is one thing. But why exactly at their place? This question is your opportunity to praise the hotel managers for a good work. Instead of just saying why you want to be a receptionist, you can elaborate on your answer.

For example you can say that you love the way their hotel is organized and managed. Or that the place has an amazing vibe. Perhaps their location is just stunning, or you got mesmerized reading all five stars reviews they got online.

Do your homework. Learn something about the hotel, find something worthy of praise. Then you can refer to it in your answer, and earn some extra points in the eyes of the hotel managers…

Ready to answer this one? I hope so! Check also the following articles to get ready for your receptionist job interview:

Matthew Chulaw
Matthew has been working in international recruitment since 2008. He helps job seekers from all walks of life to pursue their career goals, and to prepare for their interviews. He is the founder of InterviewPenguin.com website.
Matthew Chulaw
Latest posts by Matthew Chulaw (see all)
Explaining the reason for leaving your current job ...

“Why do you want to leave your current job?" It's one of the most common interview questions, yet it often leaves candidates stumped. While it may seem like an opportunity to be dismissive against your current employer, this is highly unlikely to paint you in a good light.

Here’s the question, “Why do you want to leave your current job?" It's one of the most common interview questions, yet it often leaves candidates stumped. While it may seem like an opportunity to be dismissive against your current employer, this is highly unlikely to paint you in a good light. Planning a persuasive, positive response can go a long way to highlighting your suitability for the new role.

What does the interviewer want to find out?

As with many interview questions, it can be helpful to consider what the interviewer really wants to learn when asking why you want to leave your current job. To put it another way, they could be asking: "Why are you looking for a new role?" In this context, it has much more to do with the positives afforded by a new job, rather than any negativity you may feel about your current position.

Why it's important to avoid negativity

Just because your interviewer wants to get to know you, that doesn't mean they're your friend. Remember that you're not venting in the pub after a hard day in the office, you're trying to impress a hiring manager. Launching into a tirade about grievances with your boss or employer – broken promises, sleights on your ability, lack of respect – will only paint you as someone who likes to complain. Who's to say you won't be the same at another company?

Examples of positive reasons for leaving a job

Fortunately, there are plenty of reasons for leaving a job that can be explained in a manner that paints you in a positive light. Consider the following:

  • I want to learn more
  • I feel like I'm ready to take on more responsibility
  • I believe I've progressed as far as I can in my current role
  • I need a change of environment to motivate me
  • I want to develop a new skill that isn't required in my current job
  • I don't feel like my current role is challenging me anymore


It's sensible to prepare a couple of answers to this question because people often leave jobs through a combination of factors. Your interviewer may ask for additional reasons.

How to structure your answer

Answering this question gives you the opportunity to show off how much you know about your potential new employer and demonstrate your enthusiasm for the position. Give your reason for leaving, then explain how this makes the new job particularly appealing. 

For example:

My biggest reason for leaving is that I'm ready to take on more responsibility. I want to manage a team, but there are no leadership positions available at my current employer. I enjoy delivering training sessions and upskilling junior employees. It's something I do a lot in my current role, and I've received lots of positive feedback, but I could do this even more effectively if I had my own team. I know you're looking for someone to lead a small team of graduates and I'm really excited about the prospect of helping them to develop.

Need help negotiating your new salary? Download our Job Applicant Toolkit

What's next?

Are you starting your next role remotely? Read through our helpful advice article on how to fit into a new workplace when starting remotely to help ease your first day nerves. Alternatively, if you would like to speak to one of our specialist recruitment consultants please get in touch today.

How to Answer "Why Do You Want to Leave Your Current Job ...

16-07-2020 · This blog provides the probable answers to the job interview question "why do you want to leave your current job?"

16-07-2020

How to answer “why do you want to leave your current job?”
1. To learn more
2. To take on more responsibility
3. Willing to relocate
4. Desire to commute less to work
5. You are looking for new challenges
6. You want to take a break from frequent travel away from the city
7. Your contract will expire soon

How NOT to answer “why do you want to leave your current job?”
1. Avoid mentioning office politics as a reason
2. Avoid mentioning troubles with the boss
3. Assigning unrealistic deadlines/ targets
4. Avoid being negative altogether

In almost every job interview, recruiters have asked “Why do you want to leave your current job?”

This frequented job interview question is asked to assess whether you are a flight-risk or someone who will stick around and align yourself with the company’s mission.

How you answer this job interview question can make or break your chance at bagging the job.

Here are a few ways you can answer “Why do you want to leave your last job?”

How to answer “why do you want to leave your current job?”

1. To learn more

You can say that you have saturated the learning experience in the current company and want to learn more.

This will point out that you are willing to work hard, learn, and help the XYZ Company to grow more.

Sample answer

“I have been working with a great team in the company for the past 3 years. They have helped me a lot in learning the basics since I had joined as a fresher.

However, I feel like I have reached the optimum point of learning here, and would like to take a step ahead to learn the intricacies and more complex aspects of my field.

I have read and heard of the amazing talents that your company has recruited over time and it would be a privilege for me to learn from them.”

2. To take on more responsibility

To answer such a job interview question, you can point out that you are willing to take up more responsibilities.

This will show that you are ambitious and focused.

Sample answer

“I have had a great learning experience in this organization.

However, the reason for switching jobs is that I want to take up new responsibilities that the organization is being unable to provide me with.

I have read and heard a lot about XYZ Company and it would be a great opportunity for me to work here and learn with the new responsibilities that will be provided.”

3. Willing to relocate

Many professionals want to relocate to their home city/ town after staying away from their families for a long time.

So, for such people switching jobs becomes a requirement.

Sample answer

“ I have been working in Pune for almost 6 years now. I am looking to return to my hometown since my parents need attention and I need to take care of them.

Although my current organization is a great place to work in, it does not have a branch in my hometown where they could transfer me.

The job profile offered has great scope of learning for me and I am sure that I can also add value to the team.”

4. Desire to commute less to work

The extensive daily commute to work is a serious problem in India.

It not only takes away your time but also drains you before even reaching office, affecting your productivity and health naturally.

Sample answer

“The company where I am working currently is a great organization. I have no complaints about it.

The only reason why I am looking for a change is that the distance from work to my current organization is quite a lot and my health is getting affected.

Also, the job profile that you offered is a great opportunity for me to learn and challenge myself further, and being close to my place I will also be able to focus more on the work.

Also Read: 12 Ways to Make Commuting to Work Productive.

5. You are looking for new challenges

Every employee must know when he/she starts feeling less challenged at work. That is the best time to switch jobs to meet fresh challenges.

Sample answer

“Honestly, I had the opportunity to work with the most amazing team and colleagues possible.

Not only did they treat me like an equal despite being a fresher, but they also helped me learn and guided me whenever I required a little help.

But after working there for 3 years now, I am looking forward to a fresh set of challenges and the job profile offered by you seems perfect.

It would help me to push my limits and get out of my comfort zone and I am sure I will be able to add value to the team as well.”

6. You want to take a break from frequent travel away from the city

There are many job profiles where a lot of travelling is involved, both within and outside the country. It can be quite overbearing for some.

So, it is only natural to look for a job with lesser travel and you can also say the same when asked “why do you want to leave your current job?”

Sample answers

“Although travelling and meeting clients is a great experience, but I need to slow it down by a notch.

I have been travelling on and off every week with hardly a day to spend with my parents.

So, I would like to slow it down a little to bring balance to my work and personal life.

Or,

“ We have just started our family, but with frequent travel every week, it is becoming a little difficult to take care of them.

So, I am looking for a switch where a little less travelling will be involved and I can also be around my family.

The profile offered by your company is perfect and I know I will be able to add value to the team if given the opportunity.”

7. Your contract will expire soon

It is common for some companies to hire employees on a contractual basis. So, you can cite it for a reason to switch jobs for a more permanent one when answering.

Sample answer

“Working with my current organization has been a great experience.

However, I am looking for something more permanent and secured since my contract is soon to be expiring.

I believe I have the required skill set that is required for the job role you have offered.

I am sure that I can add value to the team and also learn in the process.”

How NOT to answer “why do you want to leave your current job?”

Whatever the situation had been, it is unwise to bad-mouth your previous company. Doing so will only leave a negative impact on your recruiter.

So, to avoid it, here are a few things you must never utter when asked “why do you want to leave your current job?”

1. Avoid mentioning office politics as a reason

It is a given that almost every organization has politics. However, leaving an organization because of it might render you as an escapist, incapable, or even worse a quitter.

Trust me, you wouldn’t want to give that impression to your current recruiter.

2. Avoid mentioning troubles with the boss

It is best to not mention your troubles with him/her.

There is a chance that your recruiter will not be able to trust you if you go around bad-mouthing your boss to the world.

3. Assigning unrealistic deadlines/ targets

Mentioning deadlines and targets as a reason to switch will be a silly mistake on your front. Your recruiter might think of you as a slacker if you do so.

4. Avoid being negative altogether

You should look deeper and find a point worth putting forward when asked, “Why do you want to leave your current job?” instead of citing issues like working with a bad boss, etc.

It is best to prioritize the positive aspects of switching jobs when asked in a job interview question.

Given that we now know what NOT to say, here are a few ways you can answer “why do you want to leave your current job?”

So, the most important takeaway is do NOT badmouth your current company in front of your recruiter and always give a positive answer while answering “Why do you want to leave your current job?”

Also Read:

10 Good Reasons To Change Jobs Every 3 To 5 Years

18-12-2016 · Every time you walk into a new company and learn a new job, you get stronger in a way you couldn't at your old job. 2. People who change jobs more often get good at …

18-12-2016

Humans are not only creatures of habit, but burrowing creatures as well.

It is fun to soar like eagles, but most of us want a cozy burrow to crawl into, too!

We crave security more than most of us will admit. We look for security in all the wrong places -- like the fact that we've held the same job for years.

There is less than no security in long-term employment these days. I say "less than no security" because your only opportunity to get better at job-hunting (or finding consulting work) is when you actually do it.

Watch on Forbes:

The longer you spend locked up inside any organization, the softer your muscles become. You will need those muscles down the road -- can you really afford to let them get soft and flabby?

You can rationalize any decision, including the decision to give your current employer another year of your life because it's too much trouble to job-hunt.

You can rationalize your decision to keep doing what you've been doing for several years already through any of these arguments, or a combination of them:

1. I'll keep my job for another year because I love the people I work with!

2. I'll keep my job because I'm going to learn something new at work in 2017.

3. I'll stay at my job another year because I have a lot going on in my personal life and a job search would be too much trouble.

4. I'll keep my job because it might be risky to change jobs.

Most people don't think much about their careers. They don't change jobs unless they get laid off. People fall asleep on their careers. They forget that if they don't drive the bus, no one else will!

Here are 10 good reasons to change jobs every three to five years not because you have to, but because you want to:

1. People who change jobs more often get very good at the internal consulting skills that all of us need in this new-millennium workplace. Every time you walk into a new company and learn a new job, you get stronger in a way you couldn't at your old job.

2. People who change jobs more often get good at spotting healthy vs. toxic workplaces -- and avoiding the toxic ones.

3. More frequent job changes give you more powerful Dragon-Slaying Stories for the inevitable day when you'll be job-hunting again.

4. When you keep the same job for years on end (or even different jobs in the same organization) the network of people you know well outside the company frays and falls apart.

5. When you job-hunt more often, you become very good at branding yourself. You know what the market wants because you are in the market more frequently!

6. When you fall asleep on your career and focus all your professional energy on doing a good job for one employer, your focus turns to internal politics. Nobody outside your building cares about whether your stock is up or down on your company's internal index. You don't have time to care about that, either! Job-hunting every few years keeps you attuned to the world outside your cubicle walls.

7. When you job-hunt every three to five years, you know your market value.

8. When you move from company to company every few years, you get used to picking up new protocols, procedures, strategies and practices quickly. You learn to meet new people and work with them productively without a lot of ramp-up time. All of these are invaluable talents!

9. When you get stuck in place at one job, you fall out of practice interviewing -- and that's a very bad fate to befall anyone.

10. When you change jobs more often, you realize that there are a lot of people in the world and not all of them need to approve of you. That's okay. You don't need the whole world to love you. You only need to find the people who get you -- and thus deserve your talents!

It's a new day.

Every one of us is an entrepreneur, even if we work for one client full-time and get paid through its Payroll department.

Our careers are ours to run and nobody else will ever run them as well as we can.

Does your job really deserve another year of your life and countless more barrels of your precious mojo? That is a good question to ponder as the end of 2016 approaches!

6 Signs It's Time to Change Jobs (And What to Do About It)

24-08-2020 · Finding a fulfilling career can be a long, incremental journey. Few people enter the workforce knowing exactly what they want to do. In fact, by age 50, the average person has held 12 different jobs in an effort to find the “right fit.”. For many, this requires changing careers completely.

24-08-2020

Finding a fulfilling career can be a long, incremental journey. Few people enter the workforce knowing exactly what they want to do. In fact, by age 50, the average person has held 12 different jobs in an effort to find the “right fit.” For many, this requires changing careers completely. In 2016 alone, roughly 6.2 million workers made the leap, leaving their current roles for work in an entirely different field.

So if you’re considering a career change, you’re not alone. Taking action on these thoughts, however, can be daunting. For some, it can mean deserting a stable job to head down an uncharted path. For others, switching job functions mid-career may mean a lateral move, which can feel like a step backward—but it doesn’t have to be.

Each stage in your career provides an opportunity to learn more about yourself: your talents, interests, challenges, and workplace values. Career choices you may perceive as “missteps” often prove to be the most informative and transformational on the journey to a fulfilling career.

What’s more, the notion of career fit is a two-way street. Most employers would prefer that you feel enthusiastic, engaged, and fulfilled in your role, because happy employees are more productive employees. Understanding when it’s time to move on from your current role to pursue other passions can be a win-win for everyone.

If you’re reading this, chances are you feel the career path you’re on might not be right for you. Take this opportunity to examine your feelings toward your current role. If you can relate to the descriptions below, keep reading to discover what you can do to get out of your rut and into the career you’ve always desired.

Signs It’s Time for A Career Change

Sign #1: You’re apathetic and complacent.

As each day passes, you feel increasingly disconnected from your original reasons for entering the field. Mentally, you’ve checked out; you’re underperforming, your deadlines are slipping, and you just can’t muster the energy to fake enthusiasm about the company’s mission anymore. But this isn’t normally like you. What’s going on? The truth is, even at a job you’re passionate about, there are times when work is just going to feel like work. But if you can’t remember the last time you felt energized by a new idea or invigorated by your next project, it might be time to reevaluate your role.

Sign #2: You don’t feel like you’re making an impact.

Your job duties are the same day in and day out. Every day looks and feels identical–you’re simply performing on autopilot. You feel undervalued—like your time and talents are being wasted, and your greatest skills aren’t being put to use. Over time you’ve stopped actively seeking out new opportunities to contribute, demoralized. It’s time to find a new role that plays to your strengths, provides opportunities to develop new skills, and allows you to make meaningful contributions. Your career should boost your self-esteem, not diminish it.

Sign #3: You dread going to work.

Everyone has those days when you hit the snooze button one too many times, or it takes a little extra boost to get up and out to work. Maybe the project you’re working on just doesn’t excite you, or you’re anxious about a meeting with the boss. But this is different—this is every day. You live for the weekend, but despite your best efforts, the dread of Monday creeps in by Saturday night.  If you find yourself this dissatisfied with your current role, it’s time to think about what other areas of work might better align with your passions.

Sign #4: Even your salary can’t make up for your dissatisfaction.

The pay might be good, but the work is mindless and dreadful. At one point you could justify staying because of the paycheck, but now, even that isn’t enough. You find yourself watching the second hand of the clock tick by during meetings. You’ve reached Tuesday after a long weekend and you’re already marking your calendar until the next vacation day. While you appreciate the stability your job provides, you’re beginning to feel like you’re wasting your potential. These are clear signs that someone could use a change.

Sign #5: Your job is affecting your personal life.

Work should be challenging, but not debilitating. If you’re chronically exhausted, losing sleep, suffering from headaches, or experiencing other physical symptoms, this may be your body’s way of telling you your career is not right for you. Being permanently stressed can also impact your relationships with others close to you. Have your friends and family commented on your irritability or constant complaining? If work is turning you into an unhappy or bitter person, start to explore activities that will make you feel like yourself again.

 Sign #6: You daydream about a new career.

You spend your lunch breaks thinking about what you’d do in “your next life” and relishing the thought of how you would deliver your two-weeks’ notice. You find yourself browsing job boards instead of work emails, and you’re starting to become jealous of your friend’s careers, wondering how they landed such “perfect” jobs. You cringe when people ask you what it is you do because you wish it were something different. You’ve thought about leaving, you’ve even brought the idea up to friends in passing conversation. Would you leave your job “if you could?” If so, it’s time to go.

So, What Now?

What’s the next step if you can relate a little too well with these statements? Start making a plan to find a job that embraces your passions, because happiness is a key component of job performance and career advancement. Follow these steps to push yourself off of autopilot and make the change.

Step 1: Get specific about what’s not working.

First, take time to understand what exactly is causing you so much distress in your job. Does your dissatisfaction stem from external factors, such as your co-workers, boss, organizational culture, or even the commute? If so, would switching teams or leaving the company remedy your unhappiness, or do you still have that same sense of dread thinking about the work you’ll be doing, regardless of a change in scenery? If your discontent is related to the functional responsibilities inherent to the job itself, a more drastic change may be in order.

Step 2: Identify what you like about your current role.

Think back to when you first started in your current role. What were your motivations? Was it the day-to-day responsibilities? The promise of career growth? Then, examine the parts of your job you still find enjoyable and seek to understand why they interest you. Is it the creativity your role involves? The strategic thinking? Number crunching? Do you love the constant change…or maybe you crave stability?  Keep these themes in mind when looking toward your next role. By assessing your current likes and dislikes, you’ll have a better grasp on areas to seek out or avoid in your next career move.

Step 3: Consider your core values.

In any job, it’s important to find a good cultural fit. Examine your values and understand what type of company culture will complement your personality. Do you value autonomy, community, innovation? Would you be uncomfortable working somewhere where maintaining the status quo is encouraged? Or maybe it’s important to you that you’re working toward a benevolent cause.

Whatever your values, when taking this type of self-inventory, it’s important to be honest with yourself. Think about those friends’ jobs you covet. Are you actually interested in their role, or is it really the freedom and empowering culture you crave? Find out what makes you feel alive, even if it’s not what you (or others) think you “should” be doing. It may be that your values have changed since you first started working—and that’s ok. Just be clear on your priorities today.

Step 4: Assess your strengths and skill gaps.

If it were not for money, time, location, or whatever other reason, what would you be doing? Now is the time to figure out how to do just that. While a complete one-eighty isn’t feasible overnight, examine how your current role and your ideal role overlap. Think about your transferable skills, related experience, and network connections that can help you make the most credible transition, particularly if your current and dream jobs are worlds apart.

It’s also wise to chart out the gaps in your skills and experience that may get in the way. You may need to get creative: start a side gig, engage in part-time internships, or even return to school. Carving out a career that’s rewarding and pays the bills can take time, so be patient, and develop your plan.

Step 5: Develop and execute your plan.

After a thorough self-assessment, map out your goals, identifying short-term milestones along the way, and give yourself reasonable timelines. Perfect and polish your personal brand to boost your career search. And along the way, focus on expanding your network and reaching out to old contacts, and continually developing your skills.

Most of all, don’t be scared or disheartened by the search for your new career. Check in with yourself on a regular basis to make sure that your current role is aligned with your long-term goals. Know when to walk away, and when to move on. It’s never too late to start again in order to do what you love, every day.

Looking for More?

Explore our career advice archives for tips and strategies to help advance professionally.

EXPLORE RELATED ARTICLES

Job Interview Question: Why Are You Leaving Your Current ...

28-08-2019 · Being upfront—not pushy—about the importance of work-life integration is a great comeback to questions about why you’re leaving your current job. “Again, be careful—you don’t want to seem like you’re only applying because the company offers great work-life balance. Talk about how you’re impressed with the company’s approach to work-life balance and employee support, and that …

28-08-2019

A job interview can be a nerve-wracking experience, but it doesn’t have to be. As a job seeker, you can minimize your jitters by being prepared for the kinds of questions you might be asked. One of the most tough interview questions is when employers want to know, “Why are you leaving your current job?”

Don’t let that question stymie you. Employers asking this question are trying to uncover your motivation for finding a new job, and in particular, why you want leave your current role and work for them.

They’re also likely trying to assess if you’re an employee who will stick with the company and align with its mission. The cost of losing employees and hiring and training new ones is high, and companies want to feel like you’re applying to their job for the right reasons.

Be prepared to answer this question with confidence to boost your chances of getting hired.

check mark icon How to answer, “Why are you leaving your current job?”

You’re looking for greater work flexibility

The “why are you leaving your current job” question can open the door for you to talk about any past success working remotely, your technical know-how in operating from your home office, and your steadfast dedication to flexible work.

Brie Reynolds, FlexJobs’ senior career specialist and career coach advised, “Be careful with this one, though. You don’t want a prospective employer to think you’re only in it for the flexibility. Talk about how flexible work helps you be more productive and creative, or specifically how it’s helped your work in the past. And don’t speak badly about your less-than-flexible current or past employers.”

You’re looking for new challenges

Use the opportunity to talk about your professional skills and how you’re looking for fresh challenges in your career that make the most of your abilities. Avoid describing your current job as “dead-end,” which may come across as bad-mouthing your current employer.

You’re seeking to advance your career

Put a long-term spin on your answer by explaining that your overall career goals include achieving a specific job level or title in your profession. Follow up by saying that, in your experience, your current job doesn’t allow for the kind of advancement you’re seeking.

“A key to this response is connecting your career advancement with helping to advance the company at the same time. You’re looking for a place where you can grow with the company, not just the next step in your rise to the top,” said Reynolds.

You want to take on more responsibility

Put yourself in a good light by presenting yourself as a highly responsible job candidate who’s willing and capable of taking on even more. This forward-thinking approach signals a maturity and level-headedness that could be appealing to a potential employer.

You believe the prospective employer’s job opening is a great fit for your skills and experience

Get specific and offer a litany of reasons why you’re tailor-made for the job. Here’s where you can elaborate on the skills that have gotten you this far (to the interview stage) in the hiring process. Talk about the specific requirements of the position and how your background makes you a good fit.

You’re seeking better work-life balance

Employers are increasingly sensitive to the demands of millennials, working parents, caregivers, and others who want a healthier work-life blend.

Being upfront—not pushy—about the importance of work-life integration is a great comeback to questions about why you’re leaving your current job.

“Again, be careful—you don’t want to seem like you’re only applying because the company offers great work-life balance. Talk about how you’re impressed with the company’s approach to work-life balance and employee support, and that you’re also excited about the job opportunity itself,” warned Reynolds.

You’re looking to move your career in a different direction

Circle back to your resume and all the accomplishments spotlighted there, and then mention that you’re ready for a career pivot that will allow you to try new things. Focusing on your achievements can help.

“This is a great answer because you can talk about what you’ve achieved already, what you’d ideally love to work on in this new role, and how you can see yourself making an impact and using your skills in a new way,” said Reynolds.

You’re looking for an opportunity where you can make a difference

It’s OK to talk about frustrations in your current job that make you feel you’re unable to make the contributions you’d like to make in your career.

Talk about the specific impacts the employer’s organization has made to the profession (or in general), and discuss how you’d like to be a part of that effort in the future.

You weren’t looking to change jobs, but came across their posting and think it would be a great fit for you

Make it seem like kismet—that the job opening found you as much as you found it. This is a great answer that has the advantage of portraying you as content enough in your current job, but ready to leap for a great job opportunity when it arises.

x icon What not to say when asked, “Why are you leaving your current job?”

Sometimes certain things are better left unsaid. While you may have other reasons for leaving your job, you need to show discretion in what you share with a potential employer. Keep it professional and avoid the statements below.

I don’t get along with my boss

Not getting along with your boss or coworkers happens. Sometimes personalities don’t click, or sometimes you have a truly bad boss.

But telling this to your interviewer will only lead to them to wonder what’s wrong with you and if you won’t get along with your new boss. Talking negatively about your boss or company won’t reflect well on you. Skip this statement, even if it’s true.

I’m leaving before they fire me

Sometimes employers will allow an employee to resign instead of being fired. Or maybe you know you’re being let go for one reason or another.

No matter what it is, avoid using negative terms like “fired,” especially if it hasn’t actually happened to you yet. Talk instead about wanting to explore a new job and why you’re a great fit for the role at hand.

They don’t pay me enough

Being underpaid is a real concern. But it’s not necessary for your potential new boss to know this information.

If you’re seeking a better pay rate with a new role, focus on proving your worth and experience during the interview. When it comes time to negotiate, you’ll be in a better spot to get the salary you deserve.

I’m bored

While being at any job for long enough may cause you to tire of the everyday tasks, there are more diplomatic ways of saying this.

If you’re uninspired by your work, consider saying something like “I’m looking to grow my knowledge and experience in a new area.”

consulting icon Thinking about leaving your current job?

No matter your reason for leaving a job and seeking out a new one, FlexJobs has you covered. We have flexible jobs in over 50 career categories to help you find the perfect fit.

               Start Your Search for Flexible Work >>>      

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7 Reasons to Change Jobs, Even If You Don't Want to

16-05-2019 · If you're still on the fence about making a career switch, here are the experts' best reasons why you should give it some thought. Here are seven reasons to change jobs, even if you don't want to.

16-05-2019

Statistics have long suggested that working professionals will have up to seven careers in their lifetime.

However, this claim should be taken with a grain of salt — there's not much substantial research backing that figure, and it becomes less and less relevant in our current job-hopping work climate.

The reality, according to several career experts, is not to anticipate a lifetime of seven long-term careers. It's to plan to change your job regularly every few years, even if you like what you do and feel comfortable.

Change is difficult, but the benefits pay off in ways you might never imagined possible, both professionally and personally.

If you're still on the fence about making a career switch, here are the experts' best reasons why you should give it some thought. Here are seven reasons to change jobs, even if you don't want to.

You're coasting — and it's becoming a problem

When we find comfort in anything, be it a job, relationship, or academia, there tends to be a period of time where individuals use that moment to coast.

Avery Roth, a career change coach, has seen many working professionals find their comfort zone and stay in it. She said the longer professionals coast, the more they have to lose.

"Coasting keeps you playing small and avoiding the fulfillment of your potential," Roth told Business Insider. "While that may not seem immediately threatening, there will come a time when comfort with your job turns into boredom."

Roth warns that the longer you stay put, the more energy is required to spur you into action in pursuit of self-growth. Her advice is simple: Act now by changing careers to avoid pain later.

Damian Birkel, founder of job-searching organization Professionals in Transition, echoed Roth's sentiments about coasting leading to boredom. He also noted that your coasting may not be going unnoticed. Birkel said your boss and coworkers may already know what is happening simply by observation.

You're actually losing money staying in the same job

coworker meeting
Hero Images/Getty Images Staying with a company for more than two years is detrimental to your salary and worth, Samantha Spica, a communications manager for the online careers site Fairygodboss, said.

"You start with a base salary and your annual raise is based off of a percentage of that number," Spica told Business Insider. "There's a limit to how high your manager can increase your salary."

Spica said that by switching jobs, you can ask for a higher starting salary. And Birkel said that your new job should pay substantially more than your current salary.

The advantage that those in the process of changing jobs have is that they are able to negotiate from a place of strength. If the salary doesn't work out, professionals may decline the offer and keep looking while retaining their existing role.

2019 is the best time to change jobs

If you're looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, it is already here in 2019.

Marc Cenedella, CEO of the careers site Ladders, said that 2019 has brought the strongest hiring economy in history.

"Companies are strapped for talent," Cenedella said. "They are willing to consider people who are outside of the box. Job-seeking candidates are looking at a time when companies will consider you for roles they normally wouldn't."

Don't feel an urgent need for change? Look for a new job anyway

Christian Eilers, a career expert at online resume builder Zety, believes the best time to change jobs is not when you feel an urgent need for a change.

Often when one feels pressured to find a new job, Eilers said, they will be more likely to accept mediocre offers and lower their requirements to get out of an existing position.

"Many candidates sleep through this moment," Eilers said. "They stop advancing in their positions. Eventually, they find themselves in a place where they urgently need a new job."

Rather than accept a role less than your worth, Eilers urges professionals to switch to roles that challenge them. This is, ultimately, an investment in your future.

"People who quickly learn new skills and gain experience from various places and situations are more easily adapted to the professions of the future," Eilers said. "Settling down for a longer time without challenges and stimulation makes you stop learning and aiming for more."

You may be secretly 'gratitude shaming' yourself

According to career coach Lisa Lewis, "gratitude shaming" is when you beat yourself up about not appreciating what you already have. It also minimizes your deep-seated desire for more. You may have an internal monologue that begs you to be happy where you are and what you have, even at the cost of wanting more.

"When you weaponize gratitude against yourself, it sends your brain the message that your ambition, hunger for growth, and desire to contribute on a bigger scale isn't valid," Lewis told Business Insider.

Rather than gratitude shame, Lewis advises understanding which of your four categories of core workplace needs that are not being fulfilled. This includes asking yourself:

  • Does this role use my portfolio of strengths?
  • Does it align with my areas of interest?
  • Does the culture of the organization match my personality?
  • Does this role enable the lifestyle I want?

"When one of the four needs isn't being met, it's a great moment to explore what other jobs are out there," Lewis said. "Your gut will tell you if you're in a season where you're craving a bigger challenge and change. Don't ignore that feeling."

This is your chance to pivot into becoming a thought leader

marketing manager office coworker
Emir Memedovski/Getty Images Are there certain professionals you admire and want to be like one day? That day may never come if you stagnate in the same job.

Alissa Carpenter, owner of career and leadership development company Everything's Not OK and That's OK, believes you should start trying to seek out the thought leaders you admire.

"It will be easier to get face time with someone you admire if you're both attending the same networking event or company function," Carpenter said. "You may even have an opportunity for a skip-level meeting or coffee chat for a one-on-one conversation."

It's time to do what makes you happy

For over six years, life purpose and career coach Gracie Miller has helped people change jobs even if they weren't sure they were ready for it. Miller finds that her clients do somewhat like their jobs, but feel like something is missing. They often find they don't use a lot of their skills, are no longer interested in the work, and wish they could help people and find deeper fulfillment.

What these clients come to terms with is the realization that they wish they had found careers that paid for their bills and lit them up inside sooner. Miller discovers that it's not always about wanting to change jobs for the sake of changing jobs. It's the uncertainty that something better exists or that it does exist but you may not get it.

"It's worth the risk to go for long-term happiness," Miller said. "You have to act on the fact that deep down you know you could be more fulfilled."

The trick, Miller said, is to do some self-discovery and research. Rather than look at the same terms in your current role, seek out fields of interest to find careers that might be a better fit. The happiness will ultimately go further than impacting your own sense of self.

"You will be happier for it, and your family, friends, and coworkers will be happier to be around you," she said.

10 Steps to a Successful Career Change

10 Steps to a Successful Career Change. Review these tips for assessing your interests, exploring options, evaluating alternative career paths, and making the move to a new career. Evaluate your current job satisfaction. Keep a journal of your daily reactions to your job situation and look for recurring themes.

Hilary Allison/ The Balance

Interested in a new career? People seek to change careers for many different reasons. Your career goals or values may have changed; you may have discovered new interests that you would like to incorporate into your job, you may wish to make more money, or have more flexible hours, just to name a few.

Before you decide, it is important to take the time to evaluate your present situation, to explore career options, to decide if your career needs making over, and to choose a career that will be more satisfying for you.

There are many different reasons why people want to change careers. Of course, it's a personal decision with many factors involved. Joblist's Midlife Career Crisis survey reports on the top five reasons people change careers:

  • Better Pay: 47%
  • Too Stressful: 39%
  • Better Work-Life Balance: 37%
  • Wanted a New Challenge: 25%
  • No Longer Passionate About Field: 23%

The Joblist survey reports that most people were happier after they made the change:

  • Happier: 77%
  • More satisfied: 75%
  • More fulfilled: 69%
  • Less stressed: 65%

In addition, the people who change careers were making more money. Survey respondents who changed careers for better pay earned an additional ,800 annually compared with their previous positions.

Review these tips for assessing your interests, exploring options, evaluating alternative career paths, and making the move to a new career.

  1. Evaluate your current job satisfaction. Keep a journal of your daily reactions to your job situation and look for recurring themes. Which aspects of your current job do you like and dislike? Are your dissatisfactions related to the content of your work, your company culture or the people with whom you work? While you're doing this, there are some things you can do at your current job to help you prepare to move on when it's time for a change.
  2. Assess your interests, values, and skills. Review past successful roles, volunteer work, projects and jobs to identify preferred activities and skills. Determine whether your core values and skills are addressed through your current career. There are free online tools you can use to help assess career alternatives.
Consider alternative careers. Brainstorm ideas for career alternatives by researching career options, and discussing your core values and skills with friends, family, and networking contacts. If you’re having difficulty coming up with ideas, consider meeting with a career counselor for professional advice. Check out job options. Conduct a preliminary comparative evaluation of several fields to identify a few targets for in-depth research. You can find a wealth of information online simply by Googling the jobs that interest you. Get personal. Find out as much as much as you can about those fields and reach out to personal contacts in those sectors for informational interviews. A good source of contacts for informational interviewers is your college alumni career network. LinkedIn is another great resource for finding contacts in specific career fields of interest. Set up a job shadow (or two). Shadow professionals in fields of primary interest to observe work first hand. Spend anywhere from a few hours to a few days job shadowing people who have jobs that interest you. Your college career office is a good place to find alumni volunteers who are willing to host job shadowers. Here’s more information on job shadowing and how it works. Try it out. Identify volunteer and freelance activities related to your target field to test your interest e.g. if you are thinking of publishing as a career, try editing the PTA newsletter. If you're interested in working with animals, volunteer at your local shelter. Take a class. Investigate educational opportunities that would bridge your background to your new field. Consider taking an evening course at a local college or an online course. Spend some time at one day or weekend seminars. Contact professional groups in your target field for suggestions. Upgrade your skills. Look for ways to develop new skills in your current job which would pave the way for a change e.g. offer to write a grant proposal if grant writing is valued in your new field. If your company offers in-house training, sign up for as many classes as you can. There are ways you can position yourself for a career change without having to go back to school. Consider a new job in the same industry. Consider alternative roles within your current industry which would use the industry knowledge you already have e.g. If you are a store manager for a large retail chain and have grown tired of the evening and weekend hours, consider a move to corporate recruiting within the retail industry. Or if you are a programmer who doesn't want to program, consider technical sales or project management.

When you're ready to start applying for jobs in your new industry, be sure to write a cover letter that reflects your aspirations, as well a resume that is refocus based on your new goals. Here are tips for writing a powerful career change resume and a sample career change cover letter with writing advice.

How to explain the reasons for leaving your previous job ...

Bad reasons to give for leaving your job: The company turned out be disappointing. You didn’t like your job or your boss. Your boss did not keep his promises (of promotion or a raise) Your job was boring and you grew sick of it. You don’t want to work overtime. The targets set at work were not realistic and hard to achieve.

You are about to leave your old job, or are on the verge of accepting a new job offer. There is one question that you better be able to answer – why do you want to leave your job? The motivation behind leaving your job is something that both your current and your future bosses will want to fully understand.

When looking for a new job, I recommend that you first make a list of your reasons for leaving your old job and then arrange them in order of priority. This will help with clarifying the direction of your career, add logic and rationale to your explanation for leaving your job, and will prevent new questions being asked.

Generally speaking, people leave their jobs for professional reasons (looking for better employment, or for a company which is growing better) or personal ones (long commute, clash with studying, family reasons). Or it could also be for reasons you prefer to keep to yourself, such as that you hate your current job, the work atmosphere, or your superiors. Below is the list of common reasons for leaving your job that we often hear, and it includes both good and bad reasons to give at an interview. You have to keep the reason for leaving consistent during both the exit interview at your old workplace and the job interview at your new one. This way, your new employer will have no misgivings about you after performing a background check.

Rational, easy to understand and accept reasons for leaving your job:

  • You are looking for better career prospects, professional growth and work opportunities
  • You want a change in career direction
  • You are looking for new challenges at work
  • You were made redundant or the company closed down
  • Your company was restructuring
  • Your company underwent a merger or an acquisition
  • Your company’s growth prospects are poor
  • Your job duties have been reduced, or your job outsourced
  • You have to travel on business too often
  • You are to be sent to a faraway foreign location
  • You need to be able to take better care of your family
  • You want to study or go travelling for a prolonged period of time
  • You are employed for one project, or on a short-term contract

Bad reasons to give for leaving your job:

  • The company turned out be disappointing
  • You didn’t like your job or your boss
  • Your boss did not keep his promises (of promotion or a raise)
  • Your job was boring and you grew sick of it
  • You don’t want to work overtime
  • The targets set at work were not realistic and hard to achieve
  • Office politics
  • Lack of family support
  • You were fired
  • You left for legal reasons

I hope you found the interview tips helpful and please don’t hesitate to contact me if you require further advice.

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